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Loss of Taste and Smell

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 23, 2012 at 3:36 AM

A couple of years ago I lost my sense of taste and smell--they are interconnected--for no apparent reason other than possibly "old age" (I am 66 now). I have been following the Perfect Health Diet for about six months and it has helped improve a number of minor health issues--digestion, skin, circulation--but there has been no improvement in my ability to smell or taste.

Perhaps this is one of those conditions that lie beyond the ability of diet/nutrition to improve. My mother experienced the same thing at around the same age and it never came back for her so there may be a hereditary or genetic cause at the root of this problem in my case.

Prior to adopting the Perfect Health Diet I was on low-fat lacto-vegetarian diet for a long time, and was generally healthy, but eliminating gluten, dairy, legumes, seed oils, excess fructose and adding healthy meats, seafood, eggs, coconut products has made a big difference in my health over the past six months.

Thanks in no small measure to all the great information I have gathered from this site I believe I am on the right dietary path for me. Many thanks to everyone who has contributed.

My question is twofold:

Has anyone else lost their ability to taste and smell and have you found anything that helped improve it?

B7df53ac4261d1b1945cbcaa4a1c95ee

(5)

on October 23, 2012
at 08:56 PM

Thanks to all for the replies. If you have to lose one of your senses, taste & smell is probably the least impairing.

B7df53ac4261d1b1945cbcaa4a1c95ee

(5)

on October 23, 2012
at 11:23 AM

No, and I do not take any medications.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 23, 2012
at 05:19 AM

Have you taken antibiotics recently?

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 23, 2012
at 05:18 AM

Had you taken antibiotics recently?

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5 Answers

1
4f07dd40330ade839e68169190be8eb6

(145)

on October 23, 2012
at 05:06 AM

My Doctor did a test on me to see if I was zinc deficient. It involved drinking some tasty liquid of his own concoction. I should have been able to taste it, but the fact that I couldn't led him to believe that I was Zinc deficient. Zinc may be the answer you are looking for....

0
2f0bef2f551a38a956b19bd7a2d8b06a

on December 18, 2012
at 08:41 PM

My mother was anorexic for a long time and often complained of this. It came back once she re-fed herself. Maybe you're not taking in enough calories or, specifically, zinc, as others suggested.

B7df53ac4261d1b1945cbcaa4a1c95ee

(5)

on October 23, 2012
at 08:56 PM

Thanks to all for the replies. If you have to lose one of your senses, taste & smell is probably the least impairing.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 23, 2012
at 03:56 PM

Zinc nasal sprays were sold a few years back and those were notorious for causing loss of smell/taste. Happen to use one? Makes me think that overdoing zinc might have similar consequences.

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 23, 2012
at 02:57 PM

There is a genetic condition that leads to loss of smell (and perhaps taste) later in life (after 50). Its called p63 induced anosmia. The working hypothesis is that for people who do not have the p63 gene, aged stem cells are less able to regenerate, and thus lose their ability to cover for the p63 gene deficiency. There is some (read low funding) research into using stem cell techniques for neurodegenerative illnesses to treat p63 induced anosmia.

It does not appear to have a relationship to dietary choices.

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