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Looking for leads on wild fruit & vegetable seeds

Answered on January 20, 2014
Created January 20, 2014 at 1:52 PM

So I'm starting a garden and I'd like to grow organic fruits and vegetables that are not as high in sugar as what you'll find at the grocery store. I've read wild fruits and vegetables have a much better nutrition profile than even organic stuff you'll find at Whole Foods, which always tastes too sweet. Googling around I'm not finding that much.. does anyone have any suggestions for where I should look?

Specifically I have this article in mind!!

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/monkeys-banned-from-eating-bananas-at-devon-zoo-9058856.html

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on January 20, 2014
at 03:35 PM

Wow, pink mini-bananas! http://www.rareseeds.com/pink-banana/ "These bananas were not only beautiful, they were delicious. The taste was half-way between a banana and a plantain and less sweet than many Brazilian bananas. The texture was firm, even though they were completely ripe - there was no mushiness at all."

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on January 20, 2014
at 03:06 PM

Very cool, it's one of my goals to get a garden going in the next few years. I have a few friends that are doing well with vertical tower gardens in their backyards, but, I'm also really digging the idea of a big crazy indoor setup with neon-pink lighting. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84zh7XL15n8

These guys are usually helpful when I have dumb gardening questions -- http://www.reddit.com/r/gardening

F92f0b6a3fe3d45a489e020076904f2f

(50)

on January 20, 2014
at 03:00 PM

Thanks for the info! I also just ran into this very interesting site:

http://www.seedman.com/fruit.htm

I'm definitely starting off with easy-to-grow plants that are newbie friendly

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4 Answers

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on January 20, 2014
at 06:58 PM

do not forget to specify the type of soil, approximate pH, and other relevant info.

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on January 20, 2014
at 04:12 PM

I forgot, you can get the above at, for example, Raintree Nursery. But define your agricultural zone, so we can help you better. Nettles is an ancestral wild food which I grow in corners that are too shady. I eat them in May, and dry them for winter tea (as luck may have it, I am sipping nettles tea right now). Very nutritious, and a staple in ancestral diets in the British islands.

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on January 20, 2014
at 04:06 PM

One is aronia, an understory tree that is dominant here, and which has been developed in the former Soviet Union. I guarantee that one will not taste sweet (I have it, and I let the squirrels eat it). The berries have the highest antioxidant content of any tested food.

Seaberry will give you the whole paleo experience. The berries are 1% Vit. C by dry weight, and deep orange with lots of carotenoids and omega-7 fats which are rare. Tarter than tart, though kids and me like it. It will render you completely raw at harvest time as it has cactus-type spines. You need one male and several females.

If I were you, however, I would grow functional foods that enrich a paleo diet. Cardoon, radicchio to support the liver, beet, turnip, carrot, parsnip, squash to have the best possible carbohydrates, radicchio roots to get inulin. Jicama and sweet potatoes if you are in the South. It is not helping to have a garden, if then you grow inflammatory solanaceae. If you need more info ask again, I have two gardens and an orchard.

0
Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on January 20, 2014
at 02:52 PM

Heirloom organic is going to be the keyword.

A naturally un-sweet fruit is often going to be a naturally bad-tasting fruit. You might want to look more for easy to grow varieties for your zone rather than for wild fruit varieties with low-GI scores. Bananas aren't particularly easy to pull off in the home garden. Maybe check out blackberries / strawberries (iirc, the seascape variety is a good one.) Swiss chard is easy to grow from seed, as are most squashes / peppers. Tomatoes are fun to grow.

There are a some modern hybridized plants with unique properties, but they're not so paleolithic. (the columnar apples, corn on deck, and pomato hybrids are interesting.)

I've gone with gurney's in the past, but in reading more, I might suggest another company instead. Maybe check out rareseeds.com. "Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Co. sells only Open-Pollinated, Pure, Natural, and Non-GMO seeds."

F92f0b6a3fe3d45a489e020076904f2f

(50)

on January 20, 2014
at 03:00 PM

Thanks for the info! I also just ran into this very interesting site:

http://www.seedman.com/fruit.htm

I'm definitely starting off with easy-to-grow plants that are newbie friendly

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