3

votes

Have you used a Negative Ion Generator?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 15, 2010 at 1:20 PM

This morning i was reading Dr. Briffa's site and in his article regarding Seasonal Affective Disorder he mentioned research regarding a negative ion generator's effects in easing the problem. I had never heard of them. Did a bit of googling and i have to admit im kind of thinking of grabbing one.

Ive never felt i had Seasonal Affective Disorder before but after spending so much time outdoors this summer, getting all that sun and good air, living pretty caveman, im kind of wary of going in to NY's long darkish winter. So i thought i'd see if anyone has some experience with this.

PS: knowing that we all came out of Africa in the not too distant past I feel that none of us are probably very well suited to long, dark winters. However, while very short in the real scope of things, bunches of us have now been living in these longdarkwintery places for some generations and i wonder about coping mechanisms that we may have developed. All just food for thought. Thanks.

4efc4d54643ac2aa70327d47764e9d07

(120)

on September 29, 2012
at 12:40 PM

The levels of negative ions emitted by salt lamps are barely measurable: http://www.negativeionsinformation.org/saltcrystallamps.html

D9ad0d8ec9efab9a38349bf7caf305ad

(20)

on November 15, 2010
at 06:36 PM

Negative ions have too short a lifetime for them to have any effect whatsoever. They are snake oil. Quackery. Like magnets for joint pain. I bet you the average person on this site or any who advocate the health benefits of negative ions have absolutely no idea what they are, how they are formed and how long they last. Nor can they suggest a plausible mechanism by which they help you. Everything about them is based on testimonials. And everyone knows the scientific value of testimonials.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on November 12, 2010
at 06:26 PM

At bill: I'm very wary of space doctor stuff like this generally too but I just thought some one here might have something interesting to say. I mean, some could use your quote to deride a wonderful book like Lights Out too.

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on November 11, 2010
at 10:26 PM

I also have both. At the very least the salt lamp is a nice addition to my living room with a glowing light. I live in Western Washington and I don't really feel depressed (it must be working), but I am a big FAN of the Sun and I don't get enough here.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 11, 2010
at 09:42 PM

That doesn't really address the question. Also, does this imply that you've done more research than just a google search? If so, kindly relay your experience/research :)

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on October 29, 2010
at 07:32 PM

Deidre- double thanks. This reminded me to add it my cart. Would you still consider getting an additional UV light now?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 15, 2010
at 10:58 PM

@deidre: thanks so much for the amazon link! once again paleohacks community comes through with the quickness. I read a few reviews on there and its in my cart already. really, thanks a lot.

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4 Answers

1
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on October 15, 2010
at 03:05 PM

My friend has seasonal affective disorder (the other SAD!). He got a sunlamp and uses it to read with. He reads daily so it works out well for him. He said it has helped tons with his SAD. I suspect the only ones well adapted to low sunlight are those who have really light skin and their ancestors came from low sunlight areas. But even they will need to try to get some sunlight time once in a while and even they might benefit from a little bit of extra dietary D during winter months.

0
D9ad0d8ec9efab9a38349bf7caf305ad

on November 11, 2010
at 09:10 PM

Negative Ion Generators? Gah! Quackery! Please people, do more research than just a google search.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on November 12, 2010
at 06:26 PM

At bill: I'm very wary of space doctor stuff like this generally too but I just thought some one here might have something interesting to say. I mean, some could use your quote to deride a wonderful book like Lights Out too.

D9ad0d8ec9efab9a38349bf7caf305ad

(20)

on November 15, 2010
at 06:36 PM

Negative ions have too short a lifetime for them to have any effect whatsoever. They are snake oil. Quackery. Like magnets for joint pain. I bet you the average person on this site or any who advocate the health benefits of negative ions have absolutely no idea what they are, how they are formed and how long they last. Nor can they suggest a plausible mechanism by which they help you. Everything about them is based on testimonials. And everyone knows the scientific value of testimonials.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 11, 2010
at 09:42 PM

That doesn't really address the question. Also, does this imply that you've done more research than just a google search? If so, kindly relay your experience/research :)

0
D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

on October 15, 2010
at 06:37 PM

Yes, I use them, and also a salt lamp. A salt lamp does not need cleaning as the negative ion generators do, (as grime falls out of the air onto them and the surrounding area). The salt lamp is especially pleasant to have on, especially near the computer. I got mine on sale at a local health food store. They are often sold at craft fairs. I have wondered if one could make one by drilling a hole in a block of salt and putting in a night-light assembly.

I apologize that I don't have any references bookmarked about the negative ion generators or the salt lamps.

I leave the negative ion generators on twenty-four hours per day, and only use the salt lamp when I am home and awake.

I might be imagining it, but the salt lamp does seem to calm something around the area of the computer, and in the room. The salt lamps are attractive, too. I live in a humid climate, and need to be careful to use it in the summer, too, or humidity builds up on it, and water drops run down the lamp onto the table.

Hope this helps a bit.

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on November 11, 2010
at 10:26 PM

I also have both. At the very least the salt lamp is a nice addition to my living room with a glowing light. I live in Western Washington and I don't really feel depressed (it must be working), but I am a big FAN of the Sun and I don't get enough here.

4efc4d54643ac2aa70327d47764e9d07

(120)

on September 29, 2012
at 12:40 PM

The levels of negative ions emitted by salt lamps are barely measurable: http://www.negativeionsinformation.org/saltcrystallamps.html

0
0c0c5c65612425e497b7231c21516943

(1354)

on October 15, 2010
at 01:42 PM

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000W8Y7FY/ref=wms_ohs_product

I have the above and I love it. It helps me with the transition. I like to sit with it in the dark AM hours and have my coffee and watch the news. I now wonder whether a UV light would have been better to help get Vitamin D levels up, which also reportedly helps with Seasonal Affective Disorder. My Vitamin D levels just came back low ;(

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 15, 2010
at 10:58 PM

@deidre: thanks so much for the amazon link! once again paleohacks community comes through with the quickness. I read a few reviews on there and its in my cart already. really, thanks a lot.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on October 29, 2010
at 07:32 PM

Deidre- double thanks. This reminded me to add it my cart. Would you still consider getting an additional UV light now?

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