7

votes

Is "live blood analysis" real science?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 17, 2011 at 2:49 AM

I saw it in the latest WAPF journal and it seemed kind of suspicious. http://www.westonaprice.org/cardiovascular-disease/how-does-pork-prepared-in-various-ways-affect-the-blood

Even Andrew Weil, a wooish dude, seems to think it's quackery.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 08:13 PM

Additionally, I was trained at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington D.C. in histotechnology, immunohistochemistry, hybridization histochemistry, and grossing pathology, and have 6 years of experience in anatomical pathology as well at vet path.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 05:01 PM

BTW... this technique has been in use since the 70's.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 01:51 PM

Thoughtful response. Most of us prep vegetables for consumption, why can't meat apply as well.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 10:53 AM

Here is something for entertainment purposes, 2 pathologists and 1 supervisor I had ate absolutely no pork.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 17, 2011
at 03:02 AM

Thanks for all the links; it doesn't look particularly reliable.

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4 Answers

6
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 17, 2011
at 02:54 AM

I've been Googling it:

Here is a good blog post on it. Seems about as valid as the Oracle of Delphi.

Quackwatch, biased source I know.

Korean study that found it meant nothing.

Live blood analysis scam

It seems like woo to me. The fact they tested each food on only one person makes it pretty invalid anyway.

Sally Fallon will publish anything if it's written by the PhD.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 17, 2011
at 03:02 AM

Thanks for all the links; it doesn't look particularly reliable.

5
B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 10:50 AM

Update: I put together a sort audio clip describing this technique and how it is used in everyday pathology: http://edwardjedmonds.com/save/LBA.mp3

--

Didn't read the full article but this is a common quick diagnosis technique in pathology, a more common "body fluid" technique would be needle aspirations e.g. detecting a Fibroadenoma where the patient can be diagnosed in the same room after we spray the sample onto the slide and do a QD stain. Later we confirm the pathology with an H&E stain.

With live blood analysis you've got to know what your looking at if you want to see specific pathology. But coagulation is a real effect that is easy to see without staining.

The rule is basically this for some of the claims, if the pathology exists and is real, than it can be detected some of it with staining others without. So you spray some blood on the slide and you see red blood cells, yes they do exist and we know what that looks like and how they behave. For instance if you look and see some dried Goji berry looking things then that's a good sign you have some anemia.

However, if somebody sprays some blood on a slide and says you need to exercise more or take a calcium supplement or asks if you recently suffered a loss in the family then yes that is bogus.

Some pathology can be detected pretty quickly with staining and we can go from sample to staining within a matter of minutes. Other's can take an hour of staining before the slides are readable. Some requires no staining. However, everything is always confirmed later with the applicable stain.

Besides that Melissa everybody knows pork makes you feel like crap :) N=2

Additionally:

There is another quick diagnosis technique that is used during surgery where the surgeon will sent us a specimen while the patient is still open for what we call a "frozen section". We basically embed the tissue in a resin and then slice micron thin sections onto a glass slide, stain it and the pathologist lets the surgeon know whether or not margins have been cleared for whatever pathology they are trying to remove.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 08:13 PM

Additionally, I was trained at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington D.C. in histotechnology, immunohistochemistry, hybridization histochemistry, and grossing pathology, and have 6 years of experience in anatomical pathology as well at vet path.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 10:53 AM

Here is something for entertainment purposes, 2 pathologists and 1 supervisor I had ate absolutely no pork.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 05:01 PM

BTW... this technique has been in use since the 70's.

5
Medium avatar

on October 17, 2011
at 02:53 AM

Even if most of the time it's bad science, if you carefully control a study and see aberrations with the consumption of a particular food or food prepared a particular way, it seems worthwhile to try to pin down the cause(s) of it. If, when all is said and done, the take-home message is "you should probably marinate your pork chops" then it's not like we've been led astray in some harmful way. Probably'll taste better anyway.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 01:51 PM

Thoughtful response. Most of us prep vegetables for consumption, why can't meat apply as well.

1
Medium avatar

on October 17, 2011
at 04:21 PM

The burden of proof as to efficacy lies with the purveyor of any new technology or methodology. Bad science and lousy medicine to assume validity barring contrary evidence.

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