2

votes

WHo has a good sauerkraut recipe? or a kimchi recipe?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 08, 2011 at 5:42 AM

Please share you sauerkraut recipe: I wanna make my first own sauerkraut. What kind of pot do ihave to use? And what is the right hygene? Can i clean the post with vinegar and soap?

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on February 13, 2013
at 02:15 PM

Haha... why does the butcher scare you?

E242ecf1fecbac866894059f5304b4c6

(318)

on December 06, 2011
at 06:36 AM

that was pasted verbatim, if you need help figuring out any ingredients, let me know

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on September 09, 2011
at 07:07 AM

I would be very interested to see your wife's aunt's recipe if you can get around to posting it. Thanks

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on September 08, 2011
at 05:06 PM

We used the same method at my last job as well as stone crocks - they're both awesome. We actually made ours and drilled the hole for the airlock, worked great. Have fun!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 08, 2011
at 04:42 PM

wow. amazingly awesome:)

Medium avatar

(12379)

on September 08, 2011
at 02:54 PM

Oh that looks like such a great buy!! Please if you can remember, let us know how well it works once you get it upa nd running!

3f11b5fda91063846bba45daac3541bd

(1186)

on September 08, 2011
at 01:38 PM

I follow this kind of recipe but just make a couple quart jars worth at a time and don't submerge the kraut with anything, just screw the lid on tight and keep pushing it under the liquid once a day with my fingers. works every time.

C4134ed417dbc0a6b79ab2cee32632d3

(1801)

on September 08, 2011
at 10:00 AM

I've made my own, but I never seem to make it very well... Perhaps I just need to practice...

  • 77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

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8 Answers

2
34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on September 08, 2011
at 06:40 AM

I don't have any experience yet... but I did just literally recieve my new "picklemeister" in the mail today. who-has-a-good-sauerkraut-recipe?-or-a-kimchi-recipe?

It comes with some pretty simple recipes, cabbage, sea-salt, and maybe a little extra brine to cover. Let it sit for five or so days at room temperature and thats about it. I chose it because the airlock on the top is supposed to keep unwanted yeast growth to a minimum.

Here. is the site I ordered it from, they also sell other sauerkraut crocks as well.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 08, 2011
at 04:42 PM

wow. amazingly awesome:)

Medium avatar

(12379)

on September 08, 2011
at 02:54 PM

Oh that looks like such a great buy!! Please if you can remember, let us know how well it works once you get it upa nd running!

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on September 08, 2011
at 05:06 PM

We used the same method at my last job as well as stone crocks - they're both awesome. We actually made ours and drilled the hole for the airlock, worked great. Have fun!

1
E242ecf1fecbac866894059f5304b4c6

(318)

on December 06, 2011
at 06:36 AM

A very simple kimchi recipe from my very korean aunt:

"Ingredients:

3lbs Napa cabbage, cut in 3" lengths, 2 cups water (lukewarm), 1/3 cup salt

For kimchi sauce:

8oz (1lb) radish-shredded (optional), 1 tbsp garlic(minced), 1/2 cup hot chili power, 2 tbsp concentrated liquid from brined shrimp (one I've used) 1 tbsp concentrated liquid from brined anchovy (use 3tbsp, since you are not using liquid from brined shrimp), 1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds (optional) For me-I would still add some water to mix.

Directions:

Dissolve the salt in lukewarm water and sprinkle over cabbage. Cover (optional) and let stand 7 hours. Rinse the cabbage 3 times in cold water and let drain in a colander.

Combine the kimchi sauce ingredients and mix thoroughly into the cabbage. Put the seasoned cabbage in a container, cover and let stand at room temperature for 12 hours OR refrigerate

Please note the measurement are for 3lbs Napa cabbage. Adjust accordingly to pound of your cabbage. "

E242ecf1fecbac866894059f5304b4c6

(318)

on December 06, 2011
at 06:36 AM

that was pasted verbatim, if you need help figuring out any ingredients, let me know

1
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on September 08, 2011
at 06:56 AM

Here is a link to Sandor Kratz' "Wild Fermentation" sauerkraut.

It works really well. I put a tablespoon of carraway seeds and 12 juniper berries in, and usually a grated carrot or two.

http://www.wildfermentation.com/resources.php?page=sauerkraut

It seems pretty foolproof!

3f11b5fda91063846bba45daac3541bd

(1186)

on September 08, 2011
at 01:38 PM

I follow this kind of recipe but just make a couple quart jars worth at a time and don't submerge the kraut with anything, just screw the lid on tight and keep pushing it under the liquid once a day with my fingers. works every time.

0
0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

on December 06, 2011
at 04:35 AM

Crossposting my kimchi recipe:

December Kimchi Fatale

1 Tbsp quality sea salt, grated coarse

1 head Napa cabbage, cut into bite-sized pieces

4 carrots, thick part grated, thin parts sliced

1 medium parsnip, peeled, thick part grated, thin part sliced

1 leek, thinly sliced

10 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

6 inches ginger, peeled and cubed

2 Tbsp Italian crushed red pepper, or twice as much Korean pepper flakes

1 3-inch fatali pepper, deseeded and minced

  • Wash and cut cabbage into bite-sized pieces. (Note, using larger chunks of cabbage is more 'traditional' according to my Korean friend. I've noticed no difference in results either way.) Sprinkle with salt, toss thoroughly and set aside.
  • Wash and cut carrots, parsnip and leek, set aside separately.
  • Peel and chop/mince the garlic, ginger, fatali pepper and mix with pepper flakes. NOTE: be careful with the fatali - deseed it under running cold water and do it away from your face. Even taking these precautions I breathed in some fatali fumes and I think my brain and throat are still bleeding.
  • Mix all ingredients together thoroughly to make sure there's even distribution of the spicy elements. Pack into glass jars and lid loosely.
  • Let sit in a cool dark place for a few days to a week -- I recommend six or seven days in winter. Fermentation will happen faster in warmer temperatures. Periodically pack the kimchi back down into the developing brine to ensure even fermentation.
  • Kimchi is generally considered 'done' when the cabbage is translucent. Refrigerate and enjoy!

0
8d1ce78fe7071f2f60fd59365bf21cfc

(580)

on September 09, 2011
at 06:38 PM

This is not quite exactly a recipe. I love kimchi, but there's only maybe 1 or 2 restaurants that serve Kimchi in Helsinki. Good quality kimchi isn't available at any grocery store (actually haven't run into even bad ones). There's one brand with organic and raw sauerkraut, which I eat once or twice a week. It's delicous, and one day (after having seen a habanero-spiced sauerkraut-product on a US organic food website), I decided to put on some Pain is Good Habanero Garlic Salsa on the kraut, and it-was-amazing. I'm not saying it's kimchi, amd I think actually a pretty random combo, and it sort of reminds me of kimchi (hot and cabbage together).

Any chiliheads here? I suggest you give this a try.

0
Medium avatar

(19469)

on September 08, 2011
at 09:17 PM

I made some Kimchi a while back but think that it would have been better had I used the traditional Napa cabbage instead of green cabbage and some red Thai fish paste probably would have kicked the flavor up as well.

It was easy and a good first try though...Easy Kimchi

0
C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

on September 08, 2011
at 09:12 PM

We've got a crock that we bought at a kitchen store and fill it about halfway with a shredded cabbage/kosher salt mixture. My husband then beats the s#*t out of it with whatever implement seems the most appropriate. Then we put a saucer in the crock that almost comes to the width of it (the saucer is to keep the cabbage down). We weight the saucer down with a mason jar filled with water, cover the whole top with a dish towel and then let it sit on the counter. We haven't made it for 2 seasons (so sad) but if memory serves, it'd sit for about 10 days. You have to keep checking it to make sure the cabbage is all submerged in a brine at all times (this prevents the nasties), and to also scoop the scum off the top.

It's really nice with red cabbage. We call it Ruby Kraut after NYC's vegan restaurant Angelika Kitchen's menu item. (Ah yes, those foolish vegan days...)

If you find you don't get enough brine from just the cabbage and salt, you can mix a little salt & water to add a bit extra. Go easy, though. The cabbage will release water as it ferments and, as delicious sauerkraut juice is, you don't want to drown it!

FWIW, the crock is the style that many people buy to keep utensils in nowadays, just bigger. It's probably about 14-16" tall and about 9" in diameter. We got it at Sur la Table but I didn't see one on their website.

0
Bdede2dbc411f2533a7e6f13674ade51

(804)

on September 08, 2011
at 10:04 AM

Mmmm, sauerkraut! Surprisingly, I have a tough time finding good kraut in the area I live in Bavaria. Well, there is some decent stuff at a butcher across the way, but they scare me. I've been wanting to try to make my own for some time. I think cabbage is on the list now for the winter indoor garden we are preparing!

My wife's aunt makes incredible sauerkraut. I'll try to get the recipe tonight and post it up.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on September 09, 2011
at 07:07 AM

I would be very interested to see your wife's aunt's recipe if you can get around to posting it. Thanks

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on February 13, 2013
at 02:15 PM

Haha... why does the butcher scare you?

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