3

votes

Sauerkraut mushrooms, is it ruined?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 18, 2012 at 5:48 PM

So, I have a fermenting crock, I made some sauerkraut on the 29th of Feb. Noticed a moldy smell, and checked it today. There were ruffley white fuzzy lichen looking things, so I went to throw it out. After taking off the mushrooms I removed the weights, and started pouring. When all the top liquid was off, I noticed the smell was good and not spoiled. Could it in any way be ok? It really looks and smells good.

Thanks

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:53 PM

I see, good, glad wasn't because wasn't a good product.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:51 PM

Yum on adding beets!!!

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:50 PM

Thanks, I would appreciate that. This was not a scum, more solid than that. Can you ask if they get lichen type things?

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:40 PM

We don't eat enough kraut that we need 10 pound batches of it, so I sold it to a friend who could use it.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:34 PM

Wow, that is great news Alex. What happened to your crock? :-(

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:52 AM

Sue, I used to have one of those, and what I did was cover the entire top with plastic wrap to keep the water in the trough from evaporating. Once a day, for the first week or so, I'd run my finger all along the rim to make sure the plastic was still stuck to the crock. One batch sat like that for 4 months in a cool room before I opened it, and the kraut was perfect.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 18, 2012
at 11:40 PM

I actually have a fermenting crock with the water trench, I am thinking I let that water get too low in the trough.....even I can mess up the flawless fermenting....sigh.....

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 18, 2012
at 11:37 PM

Thanks for this link.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on March 18, 2012
at 08:56 PM

Haha, some of us need fancy airlock containers. I've tried and failed so many times to make sauerkraut using normal containers. It only works for me with the fancy airlock container.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on March 18, 2012
at 07:26 PM

Some people report being able to let theirs sit for a long time, but I find that mine gets mushy and gross if I let it sit more than about a week. Maybe it's the crazy warm winter we've been having. So if it smells good now, and if it has been about a week, I'd give it a try now rather than wait.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 18, 2012
at 06:54 PM

Ok, I'll let you know if I die....oh, should I let it sit a bit longer? Add more brine? Thanks

Medium avatar

(2301)

on March 18, 2012
at 06:52 PM

yes, do it for science.

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7 Answers

2
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on March 18, 2012
at 07:38 PM

I'd say that was just mold and/or yeast growing on the surface. In the anaerobic environment down in the brine, the sauerkraut is probably just fine. Undesirable aerobic organisms are why fermenting containers with air locks make fermentation so much easier. The first week of fermentation produces enough CO2 to completely purge the container of oxygen, and no yeasts/molds/fuzzies can grow.

And, you don't even need fancy air lock containers to do this. I make my kraut in ordinary canning jars with metal lids (making sure that the lids are new enough that the rubber seal is still soft.) My recipe is a half tablespoon salt per pound of shredded cabbage. I pack it into quart, wide-mouth jars, weigh the kraut down with little ceramic weights made for that purpose, and seal the jar tight (making sure that there is no stuff between the lid and jar.) Once a day, for the first week or so, I loosen the lid just enough for the built up gas pressure to escape with a hiss and then re-tighten the lid. After ten days to two weeks at room temp, I put the jars in the fridge to age for a month or more.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on March 18, 2012
at 08:56 PM

Haha, some of us need fancy airlock containers. I've tried and failed so many times to make sauerkraut using normal containers. It only works for me with the fancy airlock container.

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:52 AM

Sue, I used to have one of those, and what I did was cover the entire top with plastic wrap to keep the water in the trough from evaporating. Once a day, for the first week or so, I'd run my finger all along the rim to make sure the plastic was still stuck to the crock. One batch sat like that for 4 months in a cool room before I opened it, and the kraut was perfect.

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:40 PM

We don't eat enough kraut that we need 10 pound batches of it, so I sold it to a friend who could use it.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:34 PM

Wow, that is great news Alex. What happened to your crock? :-(

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:53 PM

I see, good, glad wasn't because wasn't a good product.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 18, 2012
at 11:40 PM

I actually have a fermenting crock with the water trench, I am thinking I let that water get too low in the trough.....even I can mess up the flawless fermenting....sigh.....

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on March 19, 2012
at 10:16 AM

I got one ruined batch once. I've since gotten a set of cheap airs lock from here: http://www.amazon.com/Piece-Plastic-Airlock-Sold-sets/dp/B000E60G2W/

I then punched a small hole in the lid of a wide mouth jar (had ghee in it before, all metal lid, so no BPA lining) and used gum to seal it.

I also found that using lots of salt between each layer of sliced cabbage, pack the jar all the way to the top, and then adding some water at the end, maybe half way up the jar helps kick start the fermentation.

Last batch, I also threw in some beets.

Be sure to fill water to the fill line of the air-lock as this is what keeps air out. As the bacteria ferment and produce CO2 and other gases, the gas bubbles up through the air lock water and escapes, keeping the internal pressure the same.

Doing it this way doesn't require a special expensive ceramic pot, nor weights, and is dirt cheap.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:51 PM

Yum on adding beets!!!

1
D8c04730b5d016a839b3c5b932bf59dd

on March 19, 2012
at 05:12 AM

My family has been making kraut in giant crocks in the basement for my entire life (slightly over half a century). I'm pretty sure the skim the top often (if not daily). I'll check.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:50 PM

Thanks, I would appreciate that. This was not a scum, more solid than that. Can you ask if they get lichen type things?

1
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on March 19, 2012
at 01:04 AM

Carefully remove the top layer, scrape off the mold and wipe the upper surface of the container. Then dump the kraut into a large ceramic bowl and pick through it to remove any more mold. Put the juice through the strainer and put everything back and smash it down again. It should be fine. The key to making non-fancy sauerkraut is to disturb the top EVERY SINGLE DAY, and try to keep it below 65 degrees. I have gotten wonderful kraut even with heavy top and side mold. The only time I have had to throw it away is when I failed to control the temperature.

1
Cba24b8f38b03d442bf6021cebb08e46

(88)

on March 18, 2012
at 07:30 PM

From what I have read, the top layer does develop a mold, but the rest should be fine... http://www.wildfermentation.com/resources.php?page=sauerkraut Step 8 they mention that the mold/scum is normal just discard when ready to consume

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 18, 2012
at 11:37 PM

Thanks for this link.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:02 AM

I do ferment and personally don't believe it's worth the risk eating contaminated food.

0
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on March 18, 2012
at 06:38 PM

If it smells good, I'd say take a small bite, making sure to spit it out if it tastes bad in any way, and then wait and see how you feel. If the next day you feel ok, try a larger bite. Do it for SCIENCE.

Medium avatar

(2301)

on March 18, 2012
at 06:52 PM

yes, do it for science.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on March 18, 2012
at 07:26 PM

Some people report being able to let theirs sit for a long time, but I find that mine gets mushy and gross if I let it sit more than about a week. Maybe it's the crazy warm winter we've been having. So if it smells good now, and if it has been about a week, I'd give it a try now rather than wait.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on March 18, 2012
at 06:54 PM

Ok, I'll let you know if I die....oh, should I let it sit a bit longer? Add more brine? Thanks

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