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OT-ish... anyone in San Francisco, do you grow your own food? What would be some vegetables/fruits for beginners in this climate?

Answered on February 13, 2014
Created February 12, 2014 at 2:18 AM

I just moved here, used to East Bay sunshine, so not sure what kind of crops might be good when it seems to be cloudy and (relatively) cold here.

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(10611)

on February 12, 2014
at 12:33 PM

Bay area lemons are pretty thick-skinned and usually ornamentals for show, but you could do a lot of flavoring with the rinds.

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4 Answers

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Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 12, 2014
at 12:30 PM

The Bay area is good squash growing country. Look down the coast to Salinas for more ideas - every kind of lettuce, broccoli, artichokes, strawberries, raspberries, and that's just a start. If you have lots of space anyway.

I lived 700 miles north in a colder climate, but discovered that I could easily grow rosemary and sage to bushel size in a planter box. Not only did these grow well in cool, not-so-sunny conditions, they weren't attractive to garden pests like rabbits, deer and slugs. Nothing topped my grilling fish or meat as well as sprigs of that rosemary.

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F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on February 12, 2014
at 05:14 AM

I was in SF last week and much to my surprise I saw a side yard garden in Hayes Valley (Hayes between Webster & BUchanan, lemons are missing on old Google satellite photo ) with a lemon tree and in their concrete 'front yard' additional container grown lemons.

I live in OC / SoCal and succefully grow all manner of fruits & veggies but my wife and son are probably going to uproot me and make me live in the SF Bay Area.

Having explored SF on foot a fair amount... my theory is "it's all about the 'micro-climate' that is driven by orientation of the plot / lot, local shade & sun exposure.

I would suggest broccoli, green beans & spinach. Might give onions a shot.

Updated:

https://gardenclub.homedepot.com/grow-a-vegetable-garden-in-the-shade/?cm_mmc=hd_email-_-L03_SL_TB2__-_-20140212_GC_FW2_BASE_OTHR_L03_WIN-_-Article_PlantShade&et_rid=524342

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 12, 2014
at 12:33 PM

Bay area lemons are pretty thick-skinned and usually ornamentals for show, but you could do a lot of flavoring with the rinds.

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on February 12, 2014
at 04:49 AM

I had good luck with zucchini, carrots, lettuce, strawberries (protect from birds) & arugula (took over the garden). Tomatoes were always a big fail, although Potrero Hill people I knew had great ones. Sadly no longer live in SF.

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56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on February 12, 2014
at 02:27 AM

I used to, many years ago, in the High Peninsula and subject to the fog. You can garden year round, of course. Right now you can grow lettuce and a number of greens and roots, basically anything green and root except the tropicals (sweet potato, amaranth, malabar spinach, etc.). You can plant peas now. In summer squash (summer and winter), beans (bush and pole), potato, beet, various cabbages. Stay away from solanaceae except potatoes, okra, melons, watermelon, and other heat loving things.

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