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seasalt or regular salt

Commented on January 06, 2014
Created January 01, 2014 at 4:00 PM

what is better for your healt? seasalt or regular salt?

last i've seen a video from yuri elkaim about sodium. he gives regular salt an

bad name and suggested to use seasalt.

is there a difference (besides the price:S)

thanks

A048b66e08306d405986b6c04bf5e8e4

on January 06, 2014
at 11:11 PM

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/table-salt-vs-sea-salt.html

161750c67d1c0a39309fa8fa06ce1d35

(0)

on January 01, 2014
at 09:12 PM

Precisely. Larger grains, such as kosher salt or ice cream salt (or large-grained sea salts that are compressed and then crushed), taste less salty than tiny granules such as standard table salt or ground sea salt. Alton Brown actually has a fantastic explanation of why this happens in one of his shows. It has to do something with surface area and the ability to fill the "salt receptors" on the tongue.

161750c67d1c0a39309fa8fa06ce1d35

(0)

on January 01, 2014
at 09:08 PM

What "processing" do you think you can actually do to a rock? Yes. Salt is a rock. A simple mineral. Salt comes in two forms. Rock salt, which is broken up and crushed and is most of the salt that you eat, or evaporation salt, where desalinization happens by way of solar evaporation. In other words, salty water is pumped onto a flat and the sun evaporates the water out, leaving the salt behind. Both forms of salt are identical, including the sea salt you claim is so much better. Processed the exact same, too.

I'd like to see any proof of your statements, because I can't find any.

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7 Answers

0
543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 02, 2014
at 01:22 AM

if you just want salt, then i would say choose a white salt that is free of any additives (flow agents or fillers etc).

'canning and pickling' salts are usually free of these things (check label).

personally i avoid the 'fancy' coloured salts (macrobiotic/celtic/pink/black etc), if the salt is coloured, it is worth finding out why before buying...& then deciding if you want it.

my salt of choice at the moment is a white fine sea salt (100% sea salt, no flow agents or additives etc).

0
3fc95bca9e723edfbbb72b172798ab49

(1354)

on January 01, 2014
at 07:25 PM

Well, as mentioned already, a number of people claim trace mineral benefits. Whether or not that is actually significant can be debated. However, sea salt just tastes better.

Ever try to use Morton salt to line the rim of a shot glass for tequila? I have. I wanted to down more cheap tequila just to get the salt out of my mouth. My hypothesis is that it's the difference in shape and surface area of individual grains that causes the difference in taste.

161750c67d1c0a39309fa8fa06ce1d35

(0)

on January 01, 2014
at 09:12 PM

Precisely. Larger grains, such as kosher salt or ice cream salt (or large-grained sea salts that are compressed and then crushed), taste less salty than tiny granules such as standard table salt or ground sea salt. Alton Brown actually has a fantastic explanation of why this happens in one of his shows. It has to do something with surface area and the ability to fill the "salt receptors" on the tongue.

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on January 01, 2014
at 07:12 PM

Salt mined from ten's of thousands of years ago vs. salt harvested from the sea with recent chemical and nuclear additions, which would I choose? In the USA you can get real salt.

0
A048b66e08306d405986b6c04bf5e8e4

on January 01, 2014
at 06:58 PM

Regular salt has been highly processed and milled and has all the trace minerals stripped out and promotes an acidic body state, whereas sea salt is perfectly natural and is loaded with trace minerals.

161750c67d1c0a39309fa8fa06ce1d35

(0)

on January 01, 2014
at 09:08 PM

What "processing" do you think you can actually do to a rock? Yes. Salt is a rock. A simple mineral. Salt comes in two forms. Rock salt, which is broken up and crushed and is most of the salt that you eat, or evaporation salt, where desalinization happens by way of solar evaporation. In other words, salty water is pumped onto a flat and the sun evaporates the water out, leaving the salt behind. Both forms of salt are identical, including the sea salt you claim is so much better. Processed the exact same, too.

I'd like to see any proof of your statements, because I can't find any.

0
161750c67d1c0a39309fa8fa06ce1d35

on January 01, 2014
at 06:26 PM

Salt is pretty much salt, no matter where it comes from in the world. There's not much you can change about sodium chloride (salt), though sometimes there they be infinitesimally small amounts of minerals that come along with. I haven't touched standard iodized table salt in quite some time and opt for kosher salt instead. It tastes great (milder than normal table salt) and it's hard to over-salt things.

I feel that there's the added benefit of buying local (US) instead of supporting the travel of basic minerals around the world, which as you might expect expends many, many tons of fuel coming from Himalaya, Peru, Poland, Australia, etc... just so it can have a fancy label and high price tag.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 01, 2014
at 04:59 PM

There's not a significant difference between the two. The extra mineral content from seawater is rather small - less than 10%. A gram of salt may contain ~30 mg of magnesium, but that's the only significant extra mineral it might contain.

Sea salt does not contain significant amounts of iodide, and often is not supplemented with iodine as table salts typically are, so you can end up with iodine deficiency by not consuming iodized salts - table, sea or otherwise.

0
A3e839a7f2cee0ca0bf577fefc7b89ea

on January 01, 2014
at 04:57 PM

I would recommend this readhttp://products.mercola.com/himalayan-salt/

I get reasonably priced sea salt and Himalayan salt from my local trader joes.

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