3

votes

IOdine and sea salt

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 16, 2011 at 9:37 PM

I have done alot of research on sea salt and whether I should include it in the dietto the extent of experimenting with it, throwing in a certain amount here and there. REcently I have excluded it believing(given new info-mation I recieved on the net) that it causes the excretion of nutrients.I am concerned about dietary iodine however and iodized sea salt seems like the most viable source. DOes it elevate blood pressure(it seems to)? DOes it excrete nutrients(if so what ones)? How much should one take each day(the 'average'person)? ANy ideas... And yes, I am aware that there are other posts re: sea salt but they don't answer these question.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 18, 2011
at 08:57 PM

to be or not to be...Is there a good reason to include sea salt(iodized variety) if I consume 1/2 dozen per day?

44c0064c835001351885a6d349a2542f

(279)

on April 18, 2011
at 02:35 PM

you never know, it might save your life (or not)

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 18, 2011
at 05:28 AM

I use fleur de sel and maldon sea salt for my good fish and meat meals. One of the tastiest salts.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on April 17, 2011
at 08:59 PM

well you probably don't really need to use any, but if you're gonna use it then whatever you can obtain that isn't processed would be your best bet. As mentioned the kelp granules are great as well.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on April 17, 2011
at 05:42 PM

now there's a good topic for a question

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 05:00 PM

Thanks for the donatio, Donat!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 04:59 PM

Any ideas as to where this can be found(in say a big-city in Canada)? Online ordering is not an option for me. So, do you contend that salt doesn't cause secretion of nutrients? I believe I read this relating to industrial salt but my confusion prompted this post. I'll try the Himalayans iff no nutrients are lost on the trip.

742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on April 17, 2011
at 04:59 PM

I would caution against using himalayan salt. I heard somewhere that it contains large amounts of fluoride. I think celtic sea salt would be a better alternative.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 04:56 PM

who cares Dudley do-right...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 04:54 PM

Thanks for the advice. tend to overdo things...

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on April 17, 2011
at 07:48 AM

I prefer himalayan crystal salt over iodized salt. I believe it will contain a better amount of electrolytes. You don't have to go crazy with it, but I really like using it with mashed sweet potatoes, and I also add it to my water bottles when Im going out on bike rides.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on April 17, 2011
at 07:45 AM

http://www.amazon.com/Maine-Coast-Sea-Vegetables-Alternative/dp/B0007SMLUM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1303026334&sr=8-2

2c3a4e438d71775f45e98d1334b4e8d4

(495)

on April 17, 2011
at 05:36 AM

A quick Google whack says that some top iodine-rich Paleo-friendly foods include Asparagus, Cow's Milk, Eggs, Garlic, Mushrooms, Spinach, Strawberries, Summer squash, Swiss chard, Turnip greens, and Yogurt. If you're eating 6 eggs every day, aren't you getting enough iodine? I found this helpful: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=69

2c3a4e438d71775f45e98d1334b4e8d4

(495)

on April 17, 2011
at 05:28 AM

I like to make soup broth with kombu, or add wakame to soups. I have to special order any sea veg, since I don't have an asian grocery store in my region... and there's not a lot of wild seaweed growing here in Nebraska. Fortunately, dehydrated seaweed is relatively lightweight even in large quantities, so it's not too expensive to ship.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 02:39 AM

Thats interesting to note. How much iodized salt should I add to a diet where salt(industrialized version) only comes in the form of 1 can of tuna per day. Also, is it not true that salt(sea or otherwise) causes the excretion of nutrients?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 02:37 AM

I was eating the nori sheets(seaweed I take it) but found them pretty expensive. Also where I am currently there are no sources for these products. ANy advice for iodine sources other than se vegetables?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 02:36 AM

Its all relevant as far as iodine goes, since thats the issue for me here: what sea vegetables would you recommend other than kelp. For the next half year I will be living in the bush in Northwestern Ontario and there is not much in the way of vegetable matter in my hometown. I eat 1/2 dozen eggs per day(whole eggs) and 1 can of tuna s iodine sources but iodine I percieve to be lacking.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 02:34 AM

Just so you can find yourself: I HAD included it, then stopped. I am looking to increase iodine and don't have ready access to kelp/seaweed so I don't know what would be the best option otherwise. Any advice?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on April 17, 2011
at 01:50 AM

I bounce between nori sheets and sprinking kelp on veggies throughout the week.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on April 17, 2011
at 12:15 AM

i'm sorry, i am confusedf by your question. are you saying you do not currently use salt at all, and you are wondering if you should begin to, for to increase iodine intake? or are you asking something about rock salt vs sea salt? or iodized vs not? i'm lost.

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5 Answers

2
44c0064c835001351885a6d349a2542f

(279)

on April 17, 2011
at 07:49 AM

Importantly, and contrary what european (German) warning lables lead one to believe, the iodine content of different seaweeds seems to be radically different. Nori (porphyra) appears to contain relatively quite little.

"...iodine content, and found to range from 16 microg/g (+/-2) in nori (Porphyra tenera) to over 8165 +/- 373 microg/g in one sample of processed kelp granules (a salt substitute) made from Laminaria digitata (kelp/kombu) (Thyroid. 2004 Oct;14(10):836-41.)

"The dried lavers contained lesser amounts of dietary iodine ( approximately 4-6 mg/100 g of dry weight) relative to other seaweeds, suggesting that excessive intake of the dried lavers is unlikely to result in harmful intake of dietary iodine."(J Agric Food Chem. 1999 Jun;47(6):2341-3.)

"Table 4. Mineral composition of seaweeds compared to whole foods

Iodine (mg/100 g wet weight)*

Ascophyllum nodosum 18.2 Laminaria digitata 70.0

Porphyra umbilicalis 1.3 Palmaria palmata 10.2

Whole food (mg/100 g weight)???

Whole milk 15.0 Cheddar cheese 39.0 Sirloin steak 6.0

Spinach 2.0 Bananas 8.0 Brazil nut 20.0" (Nutrition Reviews, Vol. 65, No. 12)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 18, 2011
at 08:57 PM

to be or not to be...Is there a good reason to include sea salt(iodized variety) if I consume 1/2 dozen per day?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 05:00 PM

Thanks for the donatio, Donat!

44c0064c835001351885a6d349a2542f

(279)

on April 18, 2011
at 02:35 PM

you never know, it might save your life (or not)

2
8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5

(2433)

on April 16, 2011
at 11:22 PM

Kelp granules are the way to roll if you want to increase iodine intake.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on April 17, 2011
at 07:45 AM

http://www.amazon.com/Maine-Coast-Sea-Vegetables-Alternative/dp/B0007SMLUM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1303026334&sr=8-2

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on April 17, 2011
at 01:50 AM

I bounce between nori sheets and sprinking kelp on veggies throughout the week.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 02:37 AM

I was eating the nori sheets(seaweed I take it) but found them pretty expensive. Also where I am currently there are no sources for these products. ANy advice for iodine sources other than se vegetables?

2
2c3a4e438d71775f45e98d1334b4e8d4

(495)

on April 16, 2011
at 10:00 PM

This is kinda sidestepping the question, but... If you are wanting to increase your dietary iodine without eating salt, have you considered adding sea vegetables to your diet, or taking kelp supplements?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 04:54 PM

Thanks for the advice. tend to overdo things...

2c3a4e438d71775f45e98d1334b4e8d4

(495)

on April 17, 2011
at 05:28 AM

I like to make soup broth with kombu, or add wakame to soups. I have to special order any sea veg, since I don't have an asian grocery store in my region... and there's not a lot of wild seaweed growing here in Nebraska. Fortunately, dehydrated seaweed is relatively lightweight even in large quantities, so it's not too expensive to ship.

2c3a4e438d71775f45e98d1334b4e8d4

(495)

on April 17, 2011
at 05:36 AM

A quick Google whack says that some top iodine-rich Paleo-friendly foods include Asparagus, Cow's Milk, Eggs, Garlic, Mushrooms, Spinach, Strawberries, Summer squash, Swiss chard, Turnip greens, and Yogurt. If you're eating 6 eggs every day, aren't you getting enough iodine? I found this helpful: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=69

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 02:36 AM

Its all relevant as far as iodine goes, since thats the issue for me here: what sea vegetables would you recommend other than kelp. For the next half year I will be living in the bush in Northwestern Ontario and there is not much in the way of vegetable matter in my hometown. I eat 1/2 dozen eggs per day(whole eggs) and 1 can of tuna s iodine sources but iodine I percieve to be lacking.

1
2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on April 17, 2011
at 10:09 AM

personally, I would take it all with a pinch of salt

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 04:56 PM

who cares Dudley do-right...

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on April 17, 2011
at 05:42 PM

now there's a good topic for a question

1
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on April 17, 2011
at 01:07 AM

Gary Taubes explains in Good Calories, Bad Calories (p146) that cutting our average intake of salt in HALF (which is quite hard to do) will drop blood pressure by 4 to 5 mmHg in hypertensives and only 2 mm Hg in the rest of people. If we have hypertension our blood pressure is already at least 20 mm Hg higher than normal.

Cutting our salt intake in half and decreasing our BP by 2-5mm Hg is pretty much pointless.

In my experience Ive found himalayan crystal salt to be the best

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on April 17, 2011
at 08:59 PM

well you probably don't really need to use any, but if you're gonna use it then whatever you can obtain that isn't processed would be your best bet. As mentioned the kelp granules are great as well.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 18, 2011
at 05:28 AM

I use fleur de sel and maldon sea salt for my good fish and meat meals. One of the tastiest salts.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 04:59 PM

Any ideas as to where this can be found(in say a big-city in Canada)? Online ordering is not an option for me. So, do you contend that salt doesn't cause secretion of nutrients? I believe I read this relating to industrial salt but my confusion prompted this post. I'll try the Himalayans iff no nutrients are lost on the trip.

742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on April 17, 2011
at 04:59 PM

I would caution against using himalayan salt. I heard somewhere that it contains large amounts of fluoride. I think celtic sea salt would be a better alternative.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 02:39 AM

Thats interesting to note. How much iodized salt should I add to a diet where salt(industrialized version) only comes in the form of 1 can of tuna per day. Also, is it not true that salt(sea or otherwise) causes the excretion of nutrients?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on April 17, 2011
at 07:48 AM

I prefer himalayan crystal salt over iodized salt. I believe it will contain a better amount of electrolytes. You don't have to go crazy with it, but I really like using it with mashed sweet potatoes, and I also add it to my water bottles when Im going out on bike rides.

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