2

votes

Anyone switch from sea salt to Morton's Iodized salt and feeling better?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 06, 2012 at 2:33 PM

It occurred to me that since I stopped taking my multi-vitamin, and since I've been using sea salt for years, I might not be getting enough iodine.

Right now, I'm dairy free, but do eat salmon once/week. (no sea veggies).

So, I decided to switch back to Morton's iodized salt.

Just curious, has anyone else switched to Morton's iodized salt for the IODINE? If so, notice any difference?

Thanks, Mike

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on September 09, 2012
at 09:40 PM

Whoa, epic! Mad props.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 22, 2012
at 03:03 AM

Wow! Awesome post!

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on May 10, 2012
at 06:33 PM

I would be extactic as well.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 07, 2012
at 01:47 PM

wish I knew, I'm always in need of rehydration salt solutions these days, skin tells it all! I can't seem to stay hydrated....

2a0f1afde303eadc422d015fc22f7512

(1118)

on May 07, 2012
at 04:03 AM

apparently iodine deficiency is pretty common in the paleo community. Good stuff I've learned from Chris Kresser.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 07, 2012
at 02:43 AM

celtic sea salt will probably include a tiny amount of natural iodine listed as a trace mineral under the typical analysis. eg. http://curezone.com/foods/salt/Celtic_Sea_Salt_Analysis.asp or http://www.saltoftheearth.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4:typical-analysis&catid=1:analysis-and-uses&Itemid=12

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 07, 2012
at 02:42 AM

celtic sea salt will probably include some natural iodine listed as a trace mineral under the typical analysis. eg. http://curezone.com/foods/salt/Celtic_Sea_Salt_Analysis.asp or http://www.saltoftheearth.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4:typical-analysis&catid=1:analysis-and-uses&Itemid=12

27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:52 PM

@CaveMan_Mike -- I have the same question. I like Celtic Sea Salt but wish they offered an iodized version. I notice other sea salt brands offer iodized and non-iodized version.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:14 PM

@Ingenol, you're confusing molecular iodine (I2), which sublimates at room temperature, with potassium iodide (KI), which is a stable solid salt at room temperature ( http://www.wolframalpha.com/entities/chemicals/potassium_iodide/0m/y3/3v/ ). Morton's iodized salt contains potassium iodide, not molecular iodine.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 06, 2012
at 05:39 PM

What's up with ur dehydration? I would have guesses it's the sodium (avail in both ) which would have been relevant to dehydration .

45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on May 06, 2012
at 05:16 PM

They add it so they can say they did. Remember, it's not necessary to prove that any nutrients listed are accessible to or useable by the human body in that form. They're just there.

C74581a453f1379b7a617461e2940281

(38)

on May 06, 2012
at 04:41 PM

wow, I was using sea salt too, and changed over to iodized salt, and wasn't sure if that was the reason why I felt more energized? I eat tons of veggies everyday, lots of cabbage and spinach, I'm not a nutritionalist by far, just reading these hacks every day, and learning! I've lost 40 lbs in 7 mo. I just finally broke away from 200 lb mark, I'm extactic to say I'm weighing in at 198!!!

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 06, 2012
at 04:34 PM

goitrogens: never heard of them. Thanks. I found this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goitrogens Interestingly, since going paleo, I started eating raw strawberries and raw spinach in my smoothies. I later switched to cooked spinach in my smoothies with the idea of making nutrients more bio-available.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 06, 2012
at 03:18 PM

Omg if that's true, why do they even bother to add it?

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

13 Answers

3
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on May 07, 2012
at 02:29 AM

There are people with receptor and other problems of the thyroid that have NORMAL TSH but borderline or abnormal one or more of the following tests so you must have these checked:

Total T4 (TT4) AND Free T4 (FT4)

Resin T3 Uptake (T3U/T7/T3RU) AND Free T3 (FT3)

Reverse T3 (rT3)

Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPOAb) AND Thryoglobulin Antibodies (TGB Ab)

Thyroid-Stimulating Immunoglobins (TSI) AND TSH stimulating Antibodies (TSAb)

If you have negative to all the thyroid antibodies hen I would supplement with iodine and selenium. You can do 150 mcg (micrograms) of selenium daily but iodine slowly increase. For example week 1 take daily 150 mcg (micrograms) of kelp (iodine), week 2 take 300 mcg daily, week 3 take daily 450 mcg, week 4 take daily 600 mcg. Most people without any antibodies to thyroid function (no sign of Hashimoto's autoimmune thyroid) will do well with 600 mcg to 1 gram (1000 micrograms) of kelp a day.

You should work with a functional/holistic practitioner who supports Paleo and can track and order the bloodwork/hormone panels. Do not try to do this yourself. You need help, but understand the science behind it.

Also read 2 books: Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests Are Normal: A Revolutionary Breakthrough In Understanding Hashimoto's Disease and Hypothyroidism by Dr. Datis Kharrazian, DHSc, DC, MS, MNeuroSci, FAACP, DACBN, DABCN, DIBAK, CNS - chiropractic doctor

AND

Iodine: Why you need it, Why you can't live without it by Dr. David Brownstein, MD Chris Kresser, a licensed acupuncturist, (also Paleo) has written a lot on thyroid/iodine, among many other topics on blogposts. He works with clients in his office and through Skype/phone.

I have to believe iodine and selenium is fairly important especially if consuming goitrogens and fermented vegetables. My husband and I were consuming about 1-2 pounds of COOKED goitrogenic vegetables per day with no supplemental iodine or selenium. We were using sea salt which doesn't have much iodine. We started to develop symptoms like fatigue, feeling cold, cold hands etc. These symptoms happened in both low carb and higher carb contexts, although higher carbohydrate may mask thyroid symptoms - this was mentioned multiple times at Paleo FX in Austin.

Within days of slow adding kelp supplementation (building from 150 mcg to currently 600 mcg over a month) and 150-200 mcg of selenium daily we notice a big difference in energy and not feeling cold. We have also limited our goitrogens by eliminating fermented vegetables since we do fine with raw dairy for probiotics.

We thought cooking and eating lots of saturated fat would take care of the goitrogens, but apparently that wasn't enough for us. So I compiled this list to help those trying to limit goitrogens or have had a similar experience.

Non-Goitrogenic Produce Avocado - improves thyroid function

Banana, Plaintain

Berries (except strawberries), Cherries, Citrus (lemon, lime, grapefruit, orange, etc.), Melons

Apricots, Dragonfruit, Starfruit, Grapes, Guava, Kiwi, Lychee, Mango, Apple, Pineapple, Pomegranate

Nightshades - Peppers (sweet/bell and hot), Eggplant, Tomatoes, Potatoes

Squashes - Cabeza, Zuccinni, Yellow, Butternut, Pumpkin, Bittermelon (Corolla) technically fruit

Peas, Green Beans, Carrots

Okra

Asparagas, Artichoke

Lettuce, Celery, Cucumber

Herbs - Oregano, Basil, Thyme, Parsley, Cilantro, Parsley

Mushrooms

Onions, Leeks, garlic, shallots, chives

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goitrogen Goitrogens are substances that suppress the thyroid gland by interfering with iodine uptake, which can, as a result, cause an enlargement of the thyroid, i.e., a goitre.

Fermented Vegetables in brine (salt water) NOT vinegar have high Goitrogens since the bacteria convert more to that form as in Sauerkraut, Kimchi, Pickle, etc. Certain raw foods (cooking inactivates some of the goitrogens, except in the cases of soy and millet) have been identified as goitrogenic. These goitrogenic foods include: Cassava (Tapioca), Sweet Potatoes, Rutabagas, Radishes (inc. Daikon), Turnips

Soybeans (and soybean products such as tofu, soybean oil, soy flour, soy lecithin) (High)

Pine nuts, Peanuts, Flaxseeds, Lima Beans

Millet (High)

Strawberries, Pears, Peaches (low)

Bamboo shoots

Spinach

Vegetables in the genus Brassica (cruciferous)

Bok choy, Choy sum, Mizuna Tatsoi,

Broccoli, Broccolini, Broccoflower, Kai-lan (Chinese broccoli), Rapini, Cauliflower

Brussels sprouts, Cabbage, Chinese cabbage

Canola (Rapeseed), Yu Choy,

Collard greens, Mustard Greens, Kale

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Mustard (low)

Despite being generally a stimulant, caffeine (examples: coffee, tea, cola, chocolate) acts on thyroid function as a suppressant. Indeed some studies on rats suggest that excess caffeine in conjunction with a lack of iodine may promote the formation of thyroid cancers.

Masterjohn recommends no more then 5 servings of goitrogens/week and Kresser no more then 3-6 servings/week for anyone with thyroid issues. Paul Jaminet, Chris Masterjohn, and Chris Kresser have written well on this.

http://www.westonaprice.org/basics/bearers-of-the-cross Fermentation makes soy goitrogens worse! http://blog.cholesterol-and-health.com/2010/10/fermentation-does-not-neutrailize.html

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 22, 2012
at 03:03 AM

Wow! Awesome post!

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on September 09, 2012
at 09:40 PM

Whoa, epic! Mad props.

3
2fd566cefde2de38e75e1bc13a966e16

on May 06, 2012
at 03:16 PM

Be aware that iodized salt rapidly loses iodine, which sublimes at room temperature. You might do well to supplement with a kelp- or seaweed-based product. Iodine tablets are extremely cheap.

http://chem-eng.utoronto.ca/~diosady/sltstblty.html

45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on May 06, 2012
at 05:16 PM

They add it so they can say they did. Remember, it's not necessary to prove that any nutrients listed are accessible to or useable by the human body in that form. They're just there.

27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:52 PM

@CaveMan_Mike -- I have the same question. I like Celtic Sea Salt but wish they offered an iodized version. I notice other sea salt brands offer iodized and non-iodized version.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 07, 2012
at 02:42 AM

celtic sea salt will probably include some natural iodine listed as a trace mineral under the typical analysis. eg. http://curezone.com/foods/salt/Celtic_Sea_Salt_Analysis.asp or http://www.saltoftheearth.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4:typical-analysis&catid=1:analysis-and-uses&Itemid=12

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 07, 2012
at 02:43 AM

celtic sea salt will probably include a tiny amount of natural iodine listed as a trace mineral under the typical analysis. eg. http://curezone.com/foods/salt/Celtic_Sea_Salt_Analysis.asp or http://www.saltoftheearth.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4:typical-analysis&catid=1:analysis-and-uses&Itemid=12

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 06, 2012
at 03:18 PM

Omg if that's true, why do they even bother to add it?

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:14 PM

@Ingenol, you're confusing molecular iodine (I2), which sublimates at room temperature, with potassium iodide (KI), which is a stable solid salt at room temperature ( http://www.wolframalpha.com/entities/chemicals/potassium_iodide/0m/y3/3v/ ). Morton's iodized salt contains potassium iodide, not molecular iodine.

2
F007c2666acead0ba77367cccf2f9b12

on May 06, 2012
at 04:14 PM

i sprinkle kelp granules on everything instead of salt, since i know i won't eat it any other way regularly and i feel way better doing that. i've also heard kelp aids in not absorbing heavy metals and certain other compounds you don't want in your system so that's a plus too (if it's true - either way i've noticed an energy difference). =] i order from maine coast sea vegetables.

C74581a453f1379b7a617461e2940281

(38)

on May 06, 2012
at 04:41 PM

wow, I was using sea salt too, and changed over to iodized salt, and wasn't sure if that was the reason why I felt more energized? I eat tons of veggies everyday, lots of cabbage and spinach, I'm not a nutritionalist by far, just reading these hacks every day, and learning! I've lost 40 lbs in 7 mo. I just finally broke away from 200 lb mark, I'm extactic to say I'm weighing in at 198!!!

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on May 10, 2012
at 06:33 PM

I would be extactic as well.

2
F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on May 06, 2012
at 03:53 PM

I take a kelp supplement (225 mcg iodine) because I use sea salt.

I have no idea if it's beneficial or even necessary, but it makes me feel better.

1
742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on May 07, 2012
at 12:24 AM

Whenever I introduce iodized salt into my body I get heart palpitations, night sweats and a thumping head, so I stay away from that stuff.

1
45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on May 06, 2012
at 05:18 PM

I love Eden Shake. It tastes good and has several sea vegetables hiding in it.

1
2a0f1afde303eadc422d015fc22f7512

(1118)

on May 06, 2012
at 02:46 PM

I switched to sea salt but have made a conscious effort to eat seaweed regularly as well as fish. The iodine is very important. If you're eating a lot of veggies you're probably eating a lot of goitrogens which can interfere with thyroid function, one of the reasons iodine (which balances this) is very important. You must use iodized salt or get plenty of sea veggies and seafood.

2a0f1afde303eadc422d015fc22f7512

(1118)

on May 07, 2012
at 04:03 AM

apparently iodine deficiency is pretty common in the paleo community. Good stuff I've learned from Chris Kresser.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 06, 2012
at 04:34 PM

goitrogens: never heard of them. Thanks. I found this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goitrogens Interestingly, since going paleo, I started eating raw strawberries and raw spinach in my smoothies. I later switched to cooked spinach in my smoothies with the idea of making nutrients more bio-available.

0
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 09, 2012
at 01:16 PM

150mcg is all you need a day. Actually thats more than what you need in likely (The average required amount is 100mcgs. They add 20% to cover all people - safety margin, and then add another 20% to account for giotergens)

Meats have 10-30mcg per 100 grams (chicken being about 28). Eggs have 26mcg+ EACH EGG. Cheese has about 90mcg per 100 grams. All dairy is pretty high. Veges are the same as meats at about 10-30mcgs. Like eggs, coconuts and cranberries are extra-ordinarily high.

If you find for some reason your "too low in iodine" eating a whole foods diet, it seems likely to me, that either

a) your diet isnt broad enough to included above foods like eggs, coconuts, cranberries or dairy/cheese. In fact eating lots of veg and meats, you only really need a moderate occasional amount of some higher iodine food, like seafood, cheese, dairy, cranberries, a couple of eggs, coconut flesh etc.

b) your borderline hypothyroid. If you find you need way more than 150mcg a day, thats probably the case. And you might want to do something more clever about it, that mess with your thyroids function, which can depress it, or overstimulate it. (Like, up your carbs a little, or see a doctor)

Iodised salt has 400 mcg per teaspoon. Thats about three times your daily requirement, excluding any foods you eat.

Seaweed can have thousands of micrograms.

If your really want to up your iodine, IMO: try a five egg breakfast, coconut butter, or some cranberry juice. With the iodine present in basically everything (ie your other meals), that will easily push you over the probably overly high for most people rda.

"Whenever I introduce iodized salt into my body I get heart palpitations, night sweats and a thumping head, so I stay away from that stuff."

Thats what I got. I went majorly hyperthyroid by eating too much iodine. My heartrate was high, with heat aversion and a whole bag load of horrible anxiety (well a better word is complete dread). Clearly, to me, iodised salt is a terrible idea. Theres plenty of iodine is whole land based foods, and either way, suddenly upping your iodine intake ie messing your incredibly sensitive thyroid, is most likely a terrible move.

0
Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on September 09, 2012
at 01:29 AM

I recommend Dulse flakes:

anyone-switch-from-sea-salt-to-morton's-iodized-salt-and-feeling-better?

0
C127b33eff5761c2d4fbc14cfacfe9bf

on September 08, 2012
at 07:04 PM

Kelp and other natural food additives are a good way to go instead of taking a tablet purely for the sake of adding in one element.

0
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 06, 2012
at 05:28 PM

Yes, I have issues with dehydration so switching back to iodized salt was/is beneficial to me. I still use sea salt but regular salt is needed in my diet the majority of time.

I also have low BP as well.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 06, 2012
at 05:39 PM

What's up with ur dehydration? I would have guesses it's the sodium (avail in both ) which would have been relevant to dehydration .

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 07, 2012
at 01:47 PM

wish I knew, I'm always in need of rehydration salt solutions these days, skin tells it all! I can't seem to stay hydrated....

0
5cd8441bd01fc10816085bfc092477c4

(925)

on May 06, 2012
at 03:11 PM

Iodine is really important. If you are not eating processed foods that contain a lot of salt (which I am sure you are not), it is important to put a little iodized salt in your food every day. You don't need much to be healthy

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!