2

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Vitamin-D for a cave-dweller?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 08, 2012 at 7:07 PM

I don't get much sun on my skin and won't use artificial bulbs. Also, I'd rather not use a supplement. I'm looking for exceptional food sources of vitamin-D, such as 50-100% in a single serving. (Cod liver oil, although it may qualify as a food source, is excluded.) My diet contains much true vitamin A and beta-carotene, which could exacerbate my potential vitamin-D deficiency. I have read that salmon and sardines are exceptional, but I wonder to what extent the vitamin-D survives the cooking process even when cooked just until done over lower cooking temperature. Is vitamin D relatively heat-sensitive or -resistant? I have considered eating a dozen raw egg yolks per day, but would rather not.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:58 AM

Unfortunately, not everyone can get sufficient D with that amount of exposure, even if light-skinned. Age, latitude, pollution level will all affect the amount of D produced. Best to test & see what your level is.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:55 AM

Zaitz, What you really need to know (imo) is what your blood level is. If you truly are almost never in the sun then it is very low, Im sure. You will be surprised how much Vit D it takes to get it to a good level, let alone optimal (60-80). Can you really not get out in the sun? Sun is more important for D than any food or supplement but if you cannot get out then I really wonder how you will be able to get your D to a good level.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:54 AM

Zaitz, What you really need to know (imo) is what your blood level is. If you truly are almost never in the sun then it is very low, Im sure. You will be surprised how much Vit D it takes to get it to a good level, let alone optimal (60-80). Can you really not get out in the sun? That is so importan

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on August 08, 2012
at 11:25 PM

Does solar exposure offer anything other than bad skin and vitaminD (which can be gotten from fish, egg yolk, etc.)?

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 08, 2012
at 09:20 PM

Its all just a waste of time IMO - until you know your blood level. Can you really not get out in the sun? That is so important.

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on August 08, 2012
at 09:16 PM

I want to learn more about the true value of certain foods, so I can maximize my nutrition while minimizing calories.

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on August 08, 2012
at 09:03 PM

concerning supplementation, if I started, then I wouldn't know where to stop.

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4 Answers

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5
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on August 09, 2012
at 03:03 AM

Personally, I would not want to eat as much fish as I would need in order maintain a good blood level of D3. The risk of mercury toxicity is too high in this day & age, IMO.

For example, I personally need 6,000 IUs/day from sun and/or supplements to maintain a blood level of 60 ng/ml.

*The levels are not very high for food sources: Fatty fish species, such as:

Catfish, 85 g (3 oz) provides 425 IU (5 IU/g)

Salmon, cooked, 100 g (3.5 oz) provides 360 IU (3.6 IU/g)

Mackerel, cooked, 100 g (3.5 oz), 345 IU (3.45 IU/g)

Sardines, canned in oil, drained, 50 g (1.75 oz), 250 IU (5 IU/g)

Tuna, canned in oil, 100 g (3.5 oz), 235 IU (2.35 IU/g)

Eel, cooked, 100 g (3.5 oz), 200 IU (2.00 IU/g) A whole egg provides 20 IU if egg weighs 60 g (0.333 IU/g)

Beef liver, cooked, 100 g (3.5 oz), provides 15 IU (0.15 IU/g)

Fish liver oils, such as cod liver oil, 1 Tbs. (15 ml) provides 1360 IU (90.6 IU/ml)*

D3 supplements are cheap, & most are naturally-based (Carlson's Solar D Gems are made from sheep's lanolin & cod liver oil.)

Ideal blood level for someone in excellent health is 50-60 ng/ml. If you have an inflammatory condition or autoimmune disease, then 60-80 ng/ml is a good range.

3
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on August 08, 2012
at 08:01 PM

May I ask what your reasoning is for not supplementing? (Especially considering that the USRDA has already been determined to be insufficient for health -- it is meant to prevent diseases like rickets -- not to provide optimal health). I found supplementation with vitamin D in MCTs to be highly beneficial when I can't get sun, despite consumption of salmon, scallops, and herring in substantial quantity.

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on August 08, 2012
at 09:16 PM

I want to learn more about the true value of certain foods, so I can maximize my nutrition while minimizing calories.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 08, 2012
at 09:20 PM

Its all just a waste of time IMO - until you know your blood level. Can you really not get out in the sun? That is so important.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:54 AM

Zaitz, What you really need to know (imo) is what your blood level is. If you truly are almost never in the sun then it is very low, Im sure. You will be surprised how much Vit D it takes to get it to a good level, let alone optimal (60-80). Can you really not get out in the sun? That is so importan

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on August 08, 2012
at 09:03 PM

concerning supplementation, if I started, then I wouldn't know where to stop.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:55 AM

Zaitz, What you really need to know (imo) is what your blood level is. If you truly are almost never in the sun then it is very low, Im sure. You will be surprised how much Vit D it takes to get it to a good level, let alone optimal (60-80). Can you really not get out in the sun? Sun is more important for D than any food or supplement but if you cannot get out then I really wonder how you will be able to get your D to a good level.

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on August 08, 2012
at 11:25 PM

Does solar exposure offer anything other than bad skin and vitaminD (which can be gotten from fish, egg yolk, etc.)?

2
F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on August 08, 2012
at 11:04 PM

Eat canned fish that has the bones and skin. There's more vitamin D in there than the skinless, boneless kind. Canned fish has the advantage of having edible bones, so you get more calcium than fresh fish. If you are light skinned and live in the US, 15-20 minutes of mid-day sun on your face and arms is all you need to get enough vitamin D from the sun. So if you can get outside you won't have to spend a whole lot of time squinting into that strange yellow thing in the sky.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:58 AM

Unfortunately, not everyone can get sufficient D with that amount of exposure, even if light-skinned. Age, latitude, pollution level will all affect the amount of D produced. Best to test & see what your level is.

2
4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

on August 08, 2012
at 07:18 PM

Herring, mollusks, Salmon, trout, mackeral, sardines...

This website might help you: http://www.vitamindcouncil.org

Do you know what your blood level is so that you can track your progress.

Good luck with this

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