2

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Making your own Lox(cured salmon)

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 19, 2012 at 5:02 AM

Anyone do this before? I'm a little hesitant to use the granulated sugar needed to make Lox however I'm not sure if there is any alternative. I was thinking maybe honey or some sort of syrup however I am in doubt if this will actually work. Anyways, just thought I'd ask to see if anyone has any input on this matter.

Thanks!

7d2014a54ad017aac21eaa829b2f42c6

(10)

on January 20, 2012
at 07:23 PM

So I guess that syrup is out of the question then. I love the texture of Lox however if I can only get that with granulated sugar then I may just have to do that in small amounts. Also, thanks for the heads up raydawg, was not aware of that.

7d2014a54ad017aac21eaa829b2f42c6

(10)

on January 20, 2012
at 07:20 PM

This is more along the lines of what I was thinking of trying as I don't have a smoker(I also read that it is easy to mess up smoking fish because of the strict maximum temperature requirement, which I'm sure I'd manage to mess up lol). Still a little hesitant about the sugar, maybe I'll just have to bite the bullet and use some sugar in small amounts and see how it tastes!

7d2014a54ad017aac21eaa829b2f42c6

(10)

on January 20, 2012
at 07:19 PM

Thanks for that, will try out the brown paper idea :)

7d2014a54ad017aac21eaa829b2f42c6

(10)

on January 20, 2012
at 07:15 PM

Sadly I don't have a smoker, but erything up until putting the salmon into the smoker I think I could manage ;)

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on January 19, 2012
at 05:37 PM

voted up this question simply because I would love to make my own!

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 19, 2012
at 11:45 AM

Please stay away from agave, it's equivalent to high fructose corn syrup. Don't be fooled by the marketing fluff. "Agave nectar consists primarily of fructose and glucose. One source gives 92% fructose and 8% glucose; another gives 56% fructose and 20% glucose. These differences, it is presumed, reflect variation from one vendor of agave nectar to another.[6][7]" -- from wikipedia

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4 Answers

1
Medium avatar

(4878)

on January 19, 2012
at 08:15 PM

I tried this recipe from Gnoll's blog and it was great: Gravlax

7d2014a54ad017aac21eaa829b2f42c6

(10)

on January 20, 2012
at 07:20 PM

This is more along the lines of what I was thinking of trying as I don't have a smoker(I also read that it is easy to mess up smoking fish because of the strict maximum temperature requirement, which I'm sure I'd manage to mess up lol). Still a little hesitant about the sugar, maybe I'll just have to bite the bullet and use some sugar in small amounts and see how it tastes!

1
3fe2bf1367970868757ddf7ed7c62531

(817)

on January 19, 2012
at 07:01 PM

Here in Norway we have tons of lox. We call it r??ktlaks. They just use salt and some spices (i have read cinnamon (:P), capers, garlic ect - could be fun to try out once you masted a plain version)for more flavor. You can just nix the sugar.

I read some Norwegian recipes, from what I get you salt them very well (coat them) and leave them to sit for 24 hours -In a fridge is ok. Next rinse with cold water - get all the salt off. Then you put in a 80F oven/fire for 14 hours on a wire rack. Obviously a burning fire helps here to give it that smoked taste. Douse the fire with small amounts of water to help generate smoke.

Also, a tip I read was to wrap the lox in brown paper, not plastic.

7d2014a54ad017aac21eaa829b2f42c6

(10)

on January 20, 2012
at 07:19 PM

Thanks for that, will try out the brown paper idea :)

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 19, 2012
at 11:47 AM

7d2014a54ad017aac21eaa829b2f42c6

(10)

on January 20, 2012
at 07:15 PM

Sadly I don't have a smoker, but erything up until putting the salmon into the smoker I think I could manage ;)

1
D5a4ff096a452a84a772efa0e6bc626e

(2486)

on January 19, 2012
at 05:11 AM

I've done it and it is divine! However, I've only used actual sugar, although the result doesn't taste sugary to me. If you eat regular bacon, I'd just make normal lox with sugar- it's a comparable amount of sugar spread over the side of salmon. If you're super-strict, consider using palm sugar instead (agave or honey will not give you the same textural results, I bet)

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 19, 2012
at 11:45 AM

Please stay away from agave, it's equivalent to high fructose corn syrup. Don't be fooled by the marketing fluff. "Agave nectar consists primarily of fructose and glucose. One source gives 92% fructose and 8% glucose; another gives 56% fructose and 20% glucose. These differences, it is presumed, reflect variation from one vendor of agave nectar to another.[6][7]" -- from wikipedia

7d2014a54ad017aac21eaa829b2f42c6

(10)

on January 20, 2012
at 07:23 PM

So I guess that syrup is out of the question then. I love the texture of Lox however if I can only get that with granulated sugar then I may just have to do that in small amounts. Also, thanks for the heads up raydawg, was not aware of that.

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