0

votes

Safety of aluminum foil for blacking out windows?

Commented on November 14, 2013
Created November 13, 2013 at 4:44 PM

I am going to install complete light blocking on the windows of my bedroom, but I am conflicted about the safety of polyesters. I want to go the super safe route and get a material that doesn't evaporate or shed bits at all, or that is non-toxic. I read about Robb Wolf's recommendation for aluminum foil to black out windows. Would anyone know if aluminum foil tends to evaporate when it gets hot from sunlight? I read that aluminum in the body is *bad news bears.* I guess another alternative is a faux-leather material, but I don't know what that's made of. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 14, 2013
at 01:04 PM

How about the appeal to common sense? Duh.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 14, 2013
at 05:27 AM

Appealing to authority doesn't impress me :-/.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 14, 2013
at 05:27 AM

Very cool, thanks for the informative replies.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 14, 2013
at 03:53 AM

Volatilized plasticizers like phthalates from faux leather are a more legitimate health concern than volatilized aluminum from foil.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 14, 2013
at 03:46 AM

I think you're being paranoid over imagined dangers. Worry about real dangers, like carcinogens from overcooked bacon fat. Or avoid the cortisol and just eat the bacon without worrying about it at all. Then go outside for a long walk.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 14, 2013
at 02:49 AM

Well, keep up the irrational chemophobia then. It doesn't take a PhD chemist to apply some basic common sense to answer your question (even though I am a PhD chemist).

3fc95bca9e723edfbbb72b172798ab49

(1354)

on November 13, 2013
at 11:57 PM

Aluminum is a rather ductile material, which is one of the reasons why it is so commercially popular. When stressed it will much sooner bend and contort than shear and "shed" (think what would happen if you tried to bend taffy and a cracker. Aluminum is the taffy - eventually tearing if enough force is applied, but not really "shedding" everywhere like the cracker would).

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 13, 2013
at 11:31 PM

Oh, no, my neighbors are growers. =)

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 13, 2013
at 11:30 PM

I don't use aluminum foil to cook myself, so I cannot be convinced on this with an argument by analogy.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 13, 2013
at 11:29 PM

Thanks for that. I am wondering whether there is any chance of the aluminum falling off as dust rather than melting? Say, if I repeatedly fold the aluminum foil?

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

best answer

0
3fc95bca9e723edfbbb72b172798ab49

(1354)

on November 13, 2013
at 10:59 PM

Aluminum:

Melting Point - 660.32C

Boiling Point - 2519C

Heat of Fusion - 10.71 kJ x mol^-1

Heat of Vaporization - 294.0 kJ x mol^-1

However, the outer layer of the sheet will quickly oxidize into aluminum oxide which...

Melting Point - 2072C

Boiling Point - 2977C

...is even more stable at high temperatures.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 13, 2013
at 11:29 PM

Thanks for that. I am wondering whether there is any chance of the aluminum falling off as dust rather than melting? Say, if I repeatedly fold the aluminum foil?

3fc95bca9e723edfbbb72b172798ab49

(1354)

on November 13, 2013
at 11:57 PM

Aluminum is a rather ductile material, which is one of the reasons why it is so commercially popular. When stressed it will much sooner bend and contort than shear and "shed" (think what would happen if you tried to bend taffy and a cracker. Aluminum is the taffy - eventually tearing if enough force is applied, but not really "shedding" everywhere like the cracker would).

0
Fa14fbe0ac345e586fb407dbed9eda04

on November 14, 2013
at 12:13 AM

Faux leather is made of the same plastics everything else is made out of.

As for aluminum, the FDA approved value is 0.2 mg per liter of liquid(that's in liquid), so I'm assuming as long as you aren't exposed to more than say...

50 mg/year, you should be alright.

And as already stated, aluminum won't turn into tiny dust particles you can easily inhale(unless you work in production, or are making thermite, but in both cases you wear protection, and should always do so), so breathing aluminum in will be kinda hard.

edit: I read the wrong column. The aluminum contents is for water flavor, and the FDA has determined that aluminum used as an additive is generally safe.

But yeah, I still think you should try to keep exposure to below 50mg/year

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 14, 2013
at 03:53 AM

Volatilized plasticizers like phthalates from faux leather are a more legitimate health concern than volatilized aluminum from foil.

0
3fc95bca9e723edfbbb72b172798ab49

(1354)

on November 13, 2013
at 10:55 PM

Aluminum:

Melting point 933.47 K, 660.32 °C, 1220.58 °F Boiling point 2792 K, 2519 °C, 4566 °F Heat of fusion 10.71 kJ·mol−1 Heat of vaporization 294.0 kJ·mol−1

However, the outer layer of the sheet will quickly oxidize into aluminum oxide which...

Melting point

2,072 °C (3,762 °F; 2,345 K)[2]

Boiling point

2,977 °C (5,391 °F; 3,250 K)[3]

...is even more stable at higher temperatures.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 13, 2013
at 06:12 PM

Common sense? If you can cook on the stove or in the oven with it, it's not going to melt in a slightly above room temperature window.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 13, 2013
at 11:30 PM

I don't use aluminum foil to cook myself, so I cannot be convinced on this with an argument by analogy.

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on November 13, 2013
at 05:01 PM

It will be fun when the neighbors spot the foil and call the DEA and report a growing lab in your house. LOL

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 13, 2013
at 11:31 PM

Oh, no, my neighbors are growers. =)

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!