1

votes

Low-glycemic safe starch options?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 22, 2012 at 3:40 PM

I've been looking for good starchy carbohydrates that don't spike insulin, since fruit seems to make me moody. I thought pumpkin might be a good idea, but it's not starchy at all (5 grams of carbs in 100g of pumpkin, and I'm not prepared to eat 1kg pumpkin daily).

Any ideas?

A4587cfef29863db612c43f89c202cc1

(2053)

on January 23, 2012
at 12:55 AM

+1 for making me think of Ralph Wiggum and for a good answer.

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on January 22, 2012
at 10:35 PM

Thank you Paul! I've been happily adding some starches back into my diet lately and feeling good.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 22, 2012
at 08:49 PM

I used to not mind the New England boiled dinners but this is WAY better. Actually had a chef (who was a dinner guest) praise them!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 22, 2012
at 07:10 PM

That sounds GOOD! I've been eyeing turnips lately but didn't love them as a child in New England boiled dinners. I bet they'd be good this way though.

9e20abb05f3f6e3cc4bb107f8980aecd

(5939)

on January 22, 2012
at 07:08 PM

Thank you, Rogue Nutritionist. Korion, starch by itself would have a glycemic index near that of pure glucose, since it is easily digested. What lowers the glycemic index of starch-containing foods are the other things that accompany the starch -- fiber, water, indigestible matter, acids/electrolytes, fat, protein. So if you want low glycemic index, just design your "food" yourself by adding fat, protein, vegetables for fiber, and acids to your high-glycemic starch. Then it will become a low glycemic starch.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 22, 2012
at 06:47 PM

I tell my friends I consider my "kefir kids" my new pets; I used to have a fish tank and it's about the same thing--you feed them every day. BUT, I didn't get to drink a glass or two of aquarium water every day. :-))

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on January 22, 2012
at 05:41 PM

Funny you mention it, I just saw it for the first time in a health store yesterday :) I bought one. Thanks!

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on January 22, 2012
at 05:39 PM

Yeah, I always assumed pumpkin was very low because of it's low glycemic load. Thanks for pointing that out!

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on January 22, 2012
at 05:38 PM

I bought water kefir, Nance, based on your advice and Dragonfly's advice :). Very curious about how it's gonna turn out, I might be as big of a fan of kefir as you one day :) Definitely gonna try it out!

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on January 22, 2012
at 04:43 PM

I'm looking for starchy carbs that don't cause insulin spikes like potatoes tend to do. I don't sleep very well lately. Fruit helps, but makes me moody. Potatoes help, but annoy my skin. I will try potatoes once more, to be sure. I may even try out white potatoes, though I haven't eaten any nightshades for ages now.

  • B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

    asked by

    (8938)
  • Views
    18.4K
  • Last Activity
    1278D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

9 Answers

5
Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on January 22, 2012
at 04:31 PM

Paul Jaminet talks here about starches as part of a meal having lower GI because of the other foods eaten (fats, fiber, etc.) http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=4937

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on January 22, 2012
at 10:35 PM

Thank you Paul! I've been happily adding some starches back into my diet lately and feeling good.

9e20abb05f3f6e3cc4bb107f8980aecd

(5939)

on January 22, 2012
at 07:08 PM

Thank you, Rogue Nutritionist. Korion, starch by itself would have a glycemic index near that of pure glucose, since it is easily digested. What lowers the glycemic index of starch-containing foods are the other things that accompany the starch -- fiber, water, indigestible matter, acids/electrolytes, fat, protein. So if you want low glycemic index, just design your "food" yourself by adding fat, protein, vegetables for fiber, and acids to your high-glycemic starch. Then it will become a low glycemic starch.

4
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 22, 2012
at 07:05 PM

Carrots and turnips mashed together with gobs of butter, a dash of sea salt/fresh ground pepper/nutmeg.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 22, 2012
at 07:10 PM

That sounds GOOD! I've been eyeing turnips lately but didn't love them as a child in New England boiled dinners. I bet they'd be good this way though.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 22, 2012
at 08:49 PM

I used to not mind the New England boiled dinners but this is WAY better. Actually had a chef (who was a dinner guest) praise them!

3
D5a4ff096a452a84a772efa0e6bc626e

(2486)

on January 22, 2012
at 04:36 PM

You're looking for starchy (i.e. Glucose-dominant) carbs that don't cause an insulin reaction to the glucose? I think that's unpossible, but I'd love to be corrected if someone else knows of such a mythical creature. Different carbs will spike your personal insulin different amounts, and combining carbs with fat will blunt the insulin response, but those are individual variants best determined with repeated testing with a glucose meter.

Fructose doesn't spike insulin as it is immediately shuttled to the liver. I avoid fructose, but agave syrup is known to be exceedingly high in fructose as compared to glucose...however, it seems you have the same reactions to fruit that I do, and perhaps you would be best served avoiding high-fructose foods as well. Um...sugar? It's 50/50 and that seems to work for a few out there.

I'd experiment with all colors of potato, tapioca, rice, cassava and meal combos to see if you can find a few combos that don't spike your insulin out of range; they're all going to cause some sort of insulin reaction, though, since that's what your body should do in response to glucose-

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on January 22, 2012
at 04:43 PM

I'm looking for starchy carbs that don't cause insulin spikes like potatoes tend to do. I don't sleep very well lately. Fruit helps, but makes me moody. Potatoes help, but annoy my skin. I will try potatoes once more, to be sure. I may even try out white potatoes, though I haven't eaten any nightshades for ages now.

A4587cfef29863db612c43f89c202cc1

(2053)

on January 23, 2012
at 12:55 AM

+1 for making me think of Ralph Wiggum and for a good answer.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on January 22, 2012
at 05:39 PM

Yeah, I always assumed pumpkin was very low because of it's low glycemic load. Thanks for pointing that out!

2
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 22, 2012
at 08:19 PM

If you make mashed sweet potatoes with butter there will be very little blood sugar spike.

Boiling sweet potatoes (as you do when mashing) has a glycemic index that is about half of baking them. Then adding the butter will lower it even more.

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnume/2011/584832/

2
20cc903ebccaeb1e652da3a596e8dfb4

(1038)

on January 22, 2012
at 06:02 PM

Carrots and Butternut Squash!

2
1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on January 22, 2012
at 05:26 PM

kabocha squash FTW!!!!!!!!!!!!!

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on January 22, 2012
at 05:41 PM

Funny you mention it, I just saw it for the first time in a health store yesterday :) I bought one. Thanks!

1
559a1bf85bfe38a0fbbf56377c7278b4

on January 22, 2012
at 11:27 PM

Everybody has their own different insulin reaction to different foods, so it is difficult to generalise - the safest thing is to try foods and test your own reaction to them with a blood glucose meter.

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 22, 2012
at 04:56 PM

Hey, Korion! I have to tell you my favorite by far is rutabagas.

  • First, they keep well.
  • Second, I like the color.
  • Third, I like the texture cooked--not mushy ever!
  • Fourth, I like the flavor even better than potatoes. I just do.

The only bad thing about rutabagas is that my grandkid likes 'em too and if I don't put a lot in the stew I don't get any.

Rutabagas are rated as medium on the GI index, the same as pumpkin, but for me I have no response to the rutabagas when I add them to my stews. Pumpkin or sweet potatoes, on the other hand, do cause a small bump although not outrageous in my case.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on January 22, 2012
at 05:38 PM

I bought water kefir, Nance, based on your advice and Dragonfly's advice :). Very curious about how it's gonna turn out, I might be as big of a fan of kefir as you one day :) Definitely gonna try it out!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 22, 2012
at 06:47 PM

I tell my friends I consider my "kefir kids" my new pets; I used to have a fish tank and it's about the same thing--you feed them every day. BUT, I didn't get to drink a glass or two of aquarium water every day. :-))

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!