6

votes

People who are too lazy to cook

Answered on November 25, 2014
Created December 16, 2011 at 6:12 PM

Do you think people who are "too lazy to cook" are this way because they don't have the energy because they are feeding themselves crap, or do you think if someone else started cooking healthy meals for them every day that they would gradually take an interest/be less lazy and cook for themselves due to feeling better overall?

To simplify my question, is SAD eating caused by SAD eating?

Sorry if this is confusing.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Dishes: enemy of exam season and eczema in my household!

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 18, 2011
at 11:52 PM

Wow@! the chef needs a raise

77ef7eaba743037c022c7fd28d5f99e1

(380)

on December 18, 2011
at 02:41 AM

The little knobby end on the zucchini, and the different skin texture. That's all I got. :) Did try kohlrabi for the first time last year and liked it, albeit as part of a veggie stir-fry.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 18, 2011
at 02:00 AM

Good for you! So, you now know the difference between a cuke and a zuccini? Next you'll tell me you like kohlrabi! :-))

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 12:50 AM

Yeah, I am the opposite too, in the winter I just put everything in the oven at the same time, then eat roasted meats and veg for the rest of the week. Super easy. In the summer I guess it's easier to get inspired and fancy with seasonal ingredients, lots of creative salads and quickly grilled, higher price meats for me. Takes up more time in the summer though, can't stand to turn the oven on so I have to be more creative!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 18, 2011
at 12:14 AM

Sounds to me like you're doing just fine!

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 12:14 AM

I come from a rural area, and people always think that means my peers and I must know how to cook. While it's true that our farming/fishing lives are steeped in food tradition, not a lot of kids my age were willing to learn from their parents/grandparents. It is also very biased to teaching daughters the recipes of families, because mothers don't think their sons will pass them on. It's too bad, lots of culture is going to be lost. I love to cook, however, and embrace the food culture I grew up in.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on December 17, 2011
at 10:19 PM

Hells yeah! Enabling him all the way down three pants sizes and into some seriously buff-looking muscle tone. :)

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 17, 2011
at 07:15 PM

...enabler!....

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 17, 2011
at 07:11 PM

sigh, I would just fill it up with even more zucchini

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on December 17, 2011
at 04:58 PM

Food processors and Madelin choppers are for cutting vegetables.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 17, 2011
at 03:57 PM

Yes. I make room for a freezer! I don't think folks know just how cheap and useful chest freezers are. I have ours next to the laundry machines and fold laundry on top. Meanwhile for pennies a day it stores a crapload of food. My goal is to actually empty the side-by-side freezer of all but ice cubes, those "blue things" and steam in bag veg that we go through very fast around here.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on December 17, 2011
at 01:40 PM

I think all these competitive cooking shows and gourmet cooking magazines make cooking look way too complicated, and intimidate people. It's actually pretty simple. ditch the cookbooks and jsut experiment, it can be a lot of fun. (You have to be prepared for some mistakes along the way, but that's how you learn)

0bd9775b305d2a602d496649982bc614

(252)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:03 AM

+1 for a funny question.

0bd9775b305d2a602d496649982bc614

(252)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:02 AM

When I was eating SAD I cooked more than now. Is it Ironic to you Lutfisk?

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 17, 2011
at 01:27 AM

wow, you have room in the freezer?

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 16, 2011
at 11:18 PM

Winter months are easier for me actually. Soups and stews freeze great, and heat up for a hearty meal in minutes -- even if one doesn't like to microwave.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on December 16, 2011
at 10:50 PM

Oh my gosh... sauerkraut in the crockpot? I feel so dumb... my crockpot stopped working and I threw the whole thing out. I could have used the pot for ferments. DOH!!!

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on December 16, 2011
at 10:48 PM

I remember my grandmother being horrified that my cousin taught kids how to make cake from a box in her home economics class. The fact that my cousin didn't realize that wasn't real baking makes me scared for our kids. (not that cake is real food but I'm just illustrating a point.)

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on December 16, 2011
at 09:20 PM

Agree that the winter months make it harder. Totally.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 16, 2011
at 08:36 PM

@thhq, me too! I find it relaxing, but the kid has a serious allergy to washing dishes.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 16, 2011
at 08:04 PM

If you have kids, in addition to the hours working and commuting, add the driving them around to various activities (nobody just goes out to play anymore). In our case, softball practices, games, tournaments and pitching lessons; drama and choral rehearsals and performances; and other school and church activities. It is a never ending cascade of how do we get who, where and when. We do cook, but it is not always possible.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 16, 2011
at 07:57 PM

Strangely my meal does not seem complete until I've washed dishes by hand. The dishwasher is making a nice drying rack these days.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 16, 2011
at 07:50 PM

My mom taught me to make all the stuff and I haven't stopped. SAD food inspired me to make more of same, and better than any restaurant in this town. It's not hard work for me to be eating the best crab, on a bed of cabbage, with some black pepper and grated mizithra. Nothing SAD about that.

8634d4988ced45a68e2a79e69cc01835

(1617)

on December 16, 2011
at 07:48 PM

I haven't eaten SAD in 16+ years. And I wasn't raised on it either. I am, however, too lazy to cook. I feel great, but I hate cooking. After working all day, then working out, cooking is LAST on my list of wants. My husband does like to cook, however, so I get tasty paleo food that way! Otherwise I live off Paleo Fast Food: nuts, canned fish/jerky/deli meat/fruit/raw veggies. I love healthful food, I just hate cooking.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 16, 2011
at 07:44 PM

With a name like lutfisk it's all good.

C7e3ba0ed51a6195ae022822a8f056ac

(673)

on December 16, 2011
at 07:26 PM

Dishes...my old arch nemesis.

Medium avatar

(2301)

on December 16, 2011
at 07:01 PM

I think a lot of people picture cooking as this huge elaborate thing where you have to roll out delicate crusts, chop vegetables, open bottles of wine, sautee, blah blah blah blah every time you want to eat, but how hard is it really to turn on a burner and throw a steak in a pan? That's the part that is baffling to me.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 16, 2011
at 06:28 PM

Oh, I get this one. How can you possibly cook when there is no clean dish, no counter space, and the crock pot is already filled with sauerkraut?

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13 Answers

16
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on December 16, 2011
at 06:34 PM

That is certainly part of the equation, but here in the United States, there are other things that also play a HUGE role in the "too lazy to cook" syndrome.

I think that, for some people, what may be interpreted as "too lazy to cook" is really a whole lot of other stuff that makes life complicated.

  1. People in the current generation often have never seen foods that don't come out of a box, bag, or can. Many of them have never purchased food anywhere but a big-box grocery store.

  2. The media spends an awful lot of time telling us we SHOULD be too tired to put a decent meal together -- and convincing us that "fast" food is really fast. (I got past this idea after calculating that I could put a simple curry on the table in 15 minutes -- and it took longer than that to get through the drive-thru at McDonalds!!!)

  3. Most of us work long hours, and then have to commute on top of it, so we may get on the roads by 6am, work for 9+ hrs, and then spend another hour or more getting home... by the time we've dealt with all of that, our brains are fried and we don't want to have to think about what to make for dinner. Decision Fatigue

  4. A lot of us are single, and find that recipe books are geared to making a lot more food than we're interested in -- and we, as a culture, have learned to despise "leftovers"... so it never occurs to us to cook 4 portions and put 3 in the freezer for another meal.

  5. We've bought in to the delusion that microwaves are "faster" than cooking on the stovetop, and more convenient -- but we acknowledge that they're not very good for cooking things from "real" foods, so then we're at an impasse. We don't want to use the -stove- because we perceive that it is slow... but we know the food won't taste good if we use the microwave (and really, for fresh food, takes just as long or longer than stovetop cooking!).

  6. The vast amount of conflicting nutritional advice out there just makes people throw up their hands and say "Hell, I'll never get it right anyway, so why even bother!!!"

For me, these were HUGE things to discover about our own eating patterns. I started learning to cook on the weekends, in bulk, for the coming week. I got used to small, rotating menus. I did my own math, and figured out that the time that I was spending in "drive thru" lines was PLENTY of time to put together a really good meal at home.

IMO, most people just don't think things through. They're not lazy -- they just spend too much time listening to the TV tell them that they're too tired to cook, and too much time stressing over work and money -- and they forget that, without good nutrition, that amazing body they have won't do what they need it to do to get them through all the stress.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 12:14 AM

I come from a rural area, and people always think that means my peers and I must know how to cook. While it's true that our farming/fishing lives are steeped in food tradition, not a lot of kids my age were willing to learn from their parents/grandparents. It is also very biased to teaching daughters the recipes of families, because mothers don't think their sons will pass them on. It's too bad, lots of culture is going to be lost. I love to cook, however, and embrace the food culture I grew up in.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on December 16, 2011
at 10:48 PM

I remember my grandmother being horrified that my cousin taught kids how to make cake from a box in her home economics class. The fact that my cousin didn't realize that wasn't real baking makes me scared for our kids. (not that cake is real food but I'm just illustrating a point.)

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 16, 2011
at 08:04 PM

If you have kids, in addition to the hours working and commuting, add the driving them around to various activities (nobody just goes out to play anymore). In our case, softball practices, games, tournaments and pitching lessons; drama and choral rehearsals and performances; and other school and church activities. It is a never ending cascade of how do we get who, where and when. We do cook, but it is not always possible.

7
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 16, 2011
at 06:24 PM

My "too lazy to cook" grandson actually likes cooking--what he's too lazy to do is dishes. :-))

We both strongly prefer home-cooked foods.

In my SAD days, I was frequently too sick to cook. As the illness was caused by SAD, that's where the reinforcing loop kicked in.

Now the loop turns the other way and the only limiting factor is my desire to lose the other half of my excess fat.

C7e3ba0ed51a6195ae022822a8f056ac

(673)

on December 16, 2011
at 07:26 PM

Dishes...my old arch nemesis.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 16, 2011
at 08:36 PM

@thhq, me too! I find it relaxing, but the kid has a serious allergy to washing dishes.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Dishes: enemy of exam season and eczema in my household!

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 16, 2011
at 07:57 PM

Strangely my meal does not seem complete until I've washed dishes by hand. The dishwasher is making a nice drying rack these days.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 16, 2011
at 06:28 PM

Oh, I get this one. How can you possibly cook when there is no clean dish, no counter space, and the crock pot is already filled with sauerkraut?

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on December 16, 2011
at 10:50 PM

Oh my gosh... sauerkraut in the crockpot? I feel so dumb... my crockpot stopped working and I threw the whole thing out. I could have used the pot for ferments. DOH!!!

5
Medium avatar

on December 16, 2011
at 06:50 PM

What does "too lazy too cook" look like, in terms of practice?

I have zero interest in cooking as an art. I do not go to cooking stores except to get the occasional kitchen implement. I don't own a cookbook and can't remember the time I used a recipe. Being "lazy" doesn't come into the picture. My interest in cooking extends to preparation of food so I can eat it. I don't resent the process, nor do I look forward to it, other than as a way to expedite eating when hunger is getting loud.

I "cook" most of my own meals, which mostly means I bring raw fish, poultry and beef into the proper state of readiness to consume. Sometimes oven, sometimes microwave. I would dare anyone who tastes my microwaved salmon steaks to tell me they did not think I used some elegant "poaching" method. I know how to use a microwave to great effect, mostly at very low temperatures with commensurately longer cooking times.

I also go to restaurants whose menus are friendly to my tastes.

So if you're looking to correlate lack of interest in cooking per se as synonymous with laziness, nope. I am sure many people who eat out a lot and eat SAD food a lot when they do, are people who would, and do, eat SAD food at home, too. But simply eating out often does not have to correlate with SAD. It often does, but not necessarily. In fact, when I find myself eating out often, I find myself eating out often well: that is, eating real, whole, nutritious foods, at restaurants I know and trust.

As for new restaurants, well, there's usually some entree salad with a great protein option. I can't remember the last time I have felt stymied by a restaurant's menu; there's usually something to choose, even as when you have no idea why you ended up at that restaurant, alone or with friends. If I were ever to find myself at Denny's looking at one of their colorful photo menus, I would probably be tempted to consider the battle already lost. But another part of me, more wisely, would point to the pictures of the eggs and meat, and some of the things we call vegetables and fruit.)

Otherwise (or perhaps moreover): yes, of course: SAD eating is caused by SAD eating. "X = X."

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on December 17, 2011
at 01:40 PM

I think all these competitive cooking shows and gourmet cooking magazines make cooking look way too complicated, and intimidate people. It's actually pretty simple. ditch the cookbooks and jsut experiment, it can be a lot of fun. (You have to be prepared for some mistakes along the way, but that's how you learn)

Medium avatar

(2301)

on December 16, 2011
at 07:01 PM

I think a lot of people picture cooking as this huge elaborate thing where you have to roll out delicate crusts, chop vegetables, open bottles of wine, sautee, blah blah blah blah every time you want to eat, but how hard is it really to turn on a burner and throw a steak in a pan? That's the part that is baffling to me.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on December 17, 2011
at 04:58 PM

Food processors and Madelin choppers are for cutting vegetables.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 16, 2011
at 07:50 PM

My mom taught me to make all the stuff and I haven't stopped. SAD food inspired me to make more of same, and better than any restaurant in this town. It's not hard work for me to be eating the best crab, on a bed of cabbage, with some black pepper and grated mizithra. Nothing SAD about that.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 16, 2011
at 07:44 PM

With a name like lutfisk it's all good.

4
Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on December 16, 2011
at 09:19 PM

I've been feeding my husband this way since February, but strangely he's not showing any inclination to start doing it himself... ;)

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on December 17, 2011
at 10:19 PM

Hells yeah! Enabling him all the way down three pants sizes and into some seriously buff-looking muscle tone. :)

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 17, 2011
at 07:15 PM

...enabler!....

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 18, 2011
at 11:52 PM

Wow@! the chef needs a raise

2
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 16, 2011
at 10:26 PM

Reminds me of the Ant and the Cricket fable, except, instead of being victims of the cold, they're victims of fast food. Laziness=death.

1
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on December 18, 2011
at 05:16 AM

People who are too lazy to cook shouldn't eat.

1
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 01:03 AM

I am always under time restraints (life of a university student trying to make ends meet, get volunteer hours in, and ace the tests), but I cook all of our meals from scratch. I love cooking, always have, grew up surrounded by food culture. My grandparents always had a farm, we have a huge garden, our house is surrounded by berry bushes, my boyfriend comes from a family of commercial fisherman, I have worked for two years on an organic farm, and my dad grew up selling fish and beer to tourists on the docks. My mom taught me all of our family recipes, and it has always been important for me to carry on our food traditions.

It requires some tight planning though- I always sit down at the beginning of the week and make three lists. List 1, a meal plan. I pick everything that we need for breakfast, dinner, and snacks (lunch is leftovers, so I need to make enough to dinner for that). List 2, a grocery list split into sections (meat, produce, other). I usually further split it into market/dep (I live in Quebec). List 3, a prep list. SO important!!! After working in restaurants, you learn how nothing runs smoothly without a prep list, and that includes household cooking!! At the beginning of the week, I dedicate a few hours to chopping, peeling, cutting, steaming, baking, and mixing. I can jam three full dinners (in their proper dishes etc) at a time into my small fridge, and every other nook and cranny is filled with food processed as much as I can without disrupting the flavour or quality (some things just can't be cut ahead of time...). This makes it easy for me to throw already browned meat combined with everything else into the slow cooker in the morning, or to call ahead and give my boyfriend instructions for putting a casserole in the oven. It also prevents food waste, because you know exactly what's in your fridge, what needs to be used up by when, and what leftovers are available.

These kind of practical skills were something I got from my mother, who got them from Home Economics when she went to high school (she came from a below-poverty level family with little food tradition- they mostly ate rabbits my grandma shot with brown bread and molasses, occasionally eggs the children would steal). I think these skills should be put back into Home Economics class, which in my area is mandatory for kids in grade 7/8. Sure, it's good to know how to sew a pillow case, but it is probably more useful to have the skills to feed yourself and your future family properly! Though another useful skill from home economics: we all had to sew diapers, both genders. It was neat, our first exposure to child care, and sustainable diapers!

Did anyone else have to take home economics as kids?? I was pretty sure it's an anomaly that it was mandatory at our school, but I could be wrong.

1
9ab26cee462bb3deee7835f9f7618850

on December 18, 2011
at 12:10 AM

I'm not ashamed at all to say that I'm too lazy to cook.

In fact, it makes me eat ultra-low food reward without really trying to.

For example, here's some of the foods I eat:

  • potatoes (sweet and white) microwave cooked
  • eggs cooked in the microwave
  • salmon steam cooked on the stove-top
  • microwaved rice
  • fruit
  • raw veggies

Come to think of it, that's pretty much all I eat. It's not for everyone, but it works for me!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 18, 2011
at 12:14 AM

Sounds to me like you're doing just fine!

1
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 16, 2011
at 11:16 PM

I know for myself, it was more a matter of habit than anything else. Hubby and I are both finicky, not in the usual sense, but we both can be in the mood for beef, fish, chicken, whatever at 4 o'clock, and not in the mood anymore one hour later. So it became an easy thing to eat a lot of take-out and pre-prepared stuff we kept in the freezer.

What I know is that what we make is infinitely tastier and more healthy for us, so I've slowly been making extras when we cook and freezing stuff so it can be thawed and enjoyed. We're not perfect about this, but much much better these days.

1
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 16, 2011
at 06:20 PM

I understand perfectly! I do think that SAD leads to more SAD. Especially in the winter months, it is all too easy to let lethargy set in, and fall back on canned soups and take-out pizza. But, I also think that many aren't really lazy, it is just that they either can't cook or they aren't confident. If you don't know how to cook easily, every recipe can be an ordeal. I have found it to be much harder to cook paleo. When I cooked vegetarian, I had plenty of staples on hand all the time. Now, I find myself home often, and with no meat, having to run out to get something. I had already gotten past of the drudgery of making absolutely everything from scratch. For people who are still used to CW tastes and seasonings, this part can be tough.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 12:50 AM

Yeah, I am the opposite too, in the winter I just put everything in the oven at the same time, then eat roasted meats and veg for the rest of the week. Super easy. In the summer I guess it's easier to get inspired and fancy with seasonal ingredients, lots of creative salads and quickly grilled, higher price meats for me. Takes up more time in the summer though, can't stand to turn the oven on so I have to be more creative!

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 17, 2011
at 07:11 PM

sigh, I would just fill it up with even more zucchini

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on December 16, 2011
at 09:20 PM

Agree that the winter months make it harder. Totally.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 17, 2011
at 01:27 AM

wow, you have room in the freezer?

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 16, 2011
at 11:18 PM

Winter months are easier for me actually. Soups and stews freeze great, and heat up for a hearty meal in minutes -- even if one doesn't like to microwave.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 17, 2011
at 03:57 PM

Yes. I make room for a freezer! I don't think folks know just how cheap and useful chest freezers are. I have ours next to the laundry machines and fold laundry on top. Meanwhile for pennies a day it stores a crapload of food. My goal is to actually empty the side-by-side freezer of all but ice cubes, those "blue things" and steam in bag veg that we go through very fast around here.

0
1194b5b3d277aa3b83429c134b1eb977

on November 25, 2014
at 08:47 PM

i am a self-pronounced and proud to be LAZY cook. :D

 

i just hate cooking. back when i was in culinary arts, they used to say "you can have it healthy, tasty, cheap, quick, but never all four." SAD dieters often leave healthy out to dry.

I know i just said i hate cooking, i loved it till i went to cooking school. lol. so i spent 4 years in the kitchen cooking paleo meals that follow my four rules.

1 it must have less then 5 ingredients. (not including spices, because i make blends) 

2  takes  less then 1 hour to cook from grocery bag to clean dishes put away.

3 can be stored for more then a month.

4 still tasty when reheated.

 

i literally don't spend more then 1 hour a day in the kitchen. but i still eat perfect paleo.

I HATE COOKING! I WILL DO ALMOST ANYTHING TO AVOID IT! (thanks for letting me vent)

 

as a note: unless i'm testing a new recipe against my rules, i generally don't have a zillion spices on my shelf. my spices can fit into a shoebox. thats because i abhore recipes with 20 differnt spices to be added. so when a recipe passes the test, i premix the needed spices and then scoop out the calculated amount needed each time i cook the meal. i currently have a salt pepper blend, curry, chili seasoning, all purpose roast/soup blend, fruit sauce / pie blend. one small jar that contain baggies of left over spices from making my blends so i can avoid waste.

 

i have a few recipes that have more then 5 ingredients , but the cook time and cost savings make up for it.

how i shop effects the time it takes to go from grocery bag to clean dishes. i "shop" two or three times a week. thats when i take my walks. it's therapy for me to amuse myself at the farmers market and grocery stores produce isle. or hike into the woods for wild eats. or go urban foraging. apple tree on 6th street, blackberries next to wal-mart, prickly pear behind the graveyard, etc.

 

imo SAD dieters who are"too lazy" to cook often don't know how to cook or believe it takes too much time. believe me if you follow most recipes (which are often designed to be glamorous, not practical) it will take too much time. or at least an unneccesary amount of time. cooking with any amount of efficiency accuracy using most recipes today takes math and chemistry knowledge. i promise i'm not being a prig. i'm serious. take any at-home-cook and stick them in a restraunt line cook position or a sauce cook position and watch what happens. i'm sure it could be catagorized as cruel and inhumane torture. take any modern cook book off the shelf and compare it to an old well known cookbook. (1930's or earlier) and you will notice the differance i promise. older recipes were often far more simple and straight forward.

 

I passed culnary arts with a 97% 2.0 gpa. then i promptly went home and stuck a frozen pizza in the oven. good riddance!

 

thanks for letting me vent.

:P

 

 

0
77ef7eaba743037c022c7fd28d5f99e1

(380)

on December 18, 2011
at 01:52 AM

I'm sure the answer varies, but I think for a lot of people it's [time constraints like work, gym, kids] + [lack of skills] = not much cooking going on. For me, it took the push from realizing how much better I felt and functioned eating paleo (which meant mostly home-cooked meals) to learn how to cook something other than frozen pasta and dry, tough-ass chicken breasts on a George Foreman.

Unhealthy eating habits do seem to be a self-perpetuating cycle. Sadly for most people that are in the no-cooking fast-food mode, it takes some kind of wake-up call like health problems for them to cut the shit and start cooking and thinking about what they eat. Unless they suddenly decide they enjoy cooking, some kind of compelling need has to spur them along. Saving money could be a reason, but that could take them in a bad food quality direction.

As someone who used to not even be able to tell the difference between a zucchini and a cucumber, the fact that I've been a go-to cook in certain family and friend situations recently is a bizarre development.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 18, 2011
at 02:00 AM

Good for you! So, you now know the difference between a cuke and a zuccini? Next you'll tell me you like kohlrabi! :-))

77ef7eaba743037c022c7fd28d5f99e1

(380)

on December 18, 2011
at 02:41 AM

The little knobby end on the zucchini, and the different skin texture. That's all I got. :) Did try kohlrabi for the first time last year and liked it, albeit as part of a veggie stir-fry.

0
293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on December 16, 2011
at 08:54 PM

i dont even like the SAD but my chronic pain (from genetic factors) forced me to eat SAD for a long time.

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