5

votes

Are you as upset as I am about the crap people feed their kids?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 22, 2012 at 11:14 PM

Everytime I go grocery shopping, I see all the parents buying their kids Cereals, Granola Bars, Juice, Candy etc Basically all the processed crap that people claim is healthy. It just makes me sad to see all these kids eating this crap day in and day out. And when I try to help most people they think the paleo diet is just crazy or all that meat will kill them.

78fcdeee6ac4ee7d071bbac56b9e359f

(1025)

on February 10, 2013
at 03:42 AM

+1, yes, yes a million times yes. Until more value is put on "domestic work" (taking care of one's own family), a majority of people will not be able to afford the extra monetary cost or cost in time that preparing whole foods requires. Especially true for single parents. If it makes you upset to see what children are eating, volunteer to cook a meal at their house.

936235d66c729f133b855d7ff8996a90

(47)

on February 09, 2013
at 10:50 PM

+1 to RK rant. Especially in someone else's kitchen! I'm thinking of getting my sister a pressure cooker, that is pretty much how I bother to cook just for one! Do your kids like bone broth? I haven't tried that yet on them. I think coconut rice and banana is pretty paleo & kids do need the carbs, they love it.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on May 24, 2012
at 12:27 AM

Where on earth is she that someone is using a belt on the child?!

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on March 21, 2012
at 01:55 PM

Agreed a

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on March 21, 2012
at 01:00 AM

I suppose then you just have to love and cherish her, regardless, since she is your wife. At the very very least, she should be praised for nursing for a year. It's brutal sometimes, and most women quit LONG before that, paleo or non-paleo!

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on March 20, 2012
at 08:21 PM

My wife and I both work and I already do all the shopping and cooking (and virtually every other household chore) so, yes, my wife deserves the blame! It bothers me that so many people blame husbands for blaming their wives, leaving no room for a valid complaint :P She just doesn't eat what I cook and that's the problem. I can control what appears on my daughter's plate but I can't control what she learns from watching her mom eat or what she grabs from her plate.

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on March 20, 2012
at 06:41 PM

Hey, for what it's worth, your wife breastfed for a YEAR, and that's AWESOME and way above average. I only went for 13 months before my daughter quit on me. A year should really be applauded, and if your wife isn't on board, why don't you take over shopping and cooking for her? It bothers me that so many people blame their spouse (often their wife) for what their kids eat. Even if she stays at home, you can still make breakfast and load up the crockpot with dinner before you leave for work!

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on March 20, 2012
at 05:08 PM

Love the "bowel of cereal" slip! Or did you find it more fitting to spell it that way?

C8c230c940ab575bb199cc9ef6d693dc

(85)

on March 20, 2012
at 01:38 PM

Yep. My cousin's kid is a terror. So bad that babysitters quit because she's embarrassing them when they're out. It's sad. But when I suggest changing her diet, I'm looked at like I'm speaking a foreign language.

Fb10cf8e5dbac271762e13721181d5dc

(453)

on February 24, 2012
at 09:15 PM

Yes, this. Diet's never the culprit these days though... people see the brain as something completely separate from the body and the go-to resolutions are often pharmaceuticals because behavioural and emotional issues are too often seen as something that Just Happens and we Just Have to Cope. Too bad, because from what I've seen thus far, so many problems can just go away, or at least become 100x more manageable, with the right way of eating, instead of creating a chemical dependence that MIGHT not be necessary :[ Then again, I suppose some don't... but it's SO worth a try IMO!

D465d14cf5ef9da8436caf6435a5af67

(65)

on February 23, 2012
at 05:58 PM

+1, right, and as a carnivore, I don't like to share my fatty meat.

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on February 23, 2012
at 04:16 PM

ulcova, I'm sure every parent welcomes a stranger's advice on how to raise their own kids.

91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

(2081)

on February 23, 2012
at 03:33 PM

Thank you for this! I, too, fed my kids the SAD when they were growing up, and I feel tremendous guilt about it. My poor 17-year-old, the only chick left in the nest, is now the recipient of me attempting to assuage my conscience - but he's a really good sport about it.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:56 PM

why dont you start intervening then, in the name of the community, ulcova? let me know how that goes for you.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:54 PM

exactly. very well said. thank you.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:39 PM

I'm pretty sure The Happening (Aka Trips Festival) took place in January 1966 at Longshoreman's Hall in San Francisco. I wasn't there but it interests me. The world took a left turn and hasn't been the same since. You can see Gene Anthony's photo record at wolfgangsvault.com.

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:35 PM

But children aren't given this right. They don't have a choice. And they suffer. And nowadays parents shouldn't be so almighty as they were decades ago. Children should be raised by the community, and the community should know better. Child abuse and domestic abuse is fortunately not considered "family business" anymore.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:33 PM

+1 for too much @loon. Too much junk food.

C2ad96801ec1e22d2bf62475b6e52751

(1416)

on February 23, 2012
at 01:36 AM

Michelle Obama for OP on line one.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:40 AM

+1. The last thing anyone needs is more food police, paleo or not.

E34fbfa1bca9ae970c9c7313bf9de9f8

(1436)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:37 AM

+1 - came here to say pretty much that.

94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

(1311)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:13 AM

Agreed - my stepdaughter has had thrush issues since she was a little girl and has major mood swings and tantrems - she still has these problems at 14 years old. No one will listen to my suggestion that she cuts out sugar (or everyone is too lazy)..? Instead she is allowed to eat what she wants as are her siblings which is the only non-Paleo shelf in my pantry (which I frown at).

7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on February 23, 2012
at 12:12 AM

Yes. I agree completely. Although I don't think the asker is stating anything should be mandated...I really like these responses so far. It is inspiring to me.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:12 AM

Eh, my advice is to just let it go. And meanwhile, this thread is pretty entertaining: http://paleohacks.com/questions/82462/does-anyone-else-sneak-a-look-at-other-peoples-shopping#axzz1n9v4wbxa.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:10 AM

+1. We sure don't wanna start sounding like the vegans.

94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

(1311)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:09 AM

Yes I agree - it is very sad and I feel awful for them!

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:08 AM

More steak for us meat eaters.

7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on February 23, 2012
at 12:07 AM

+1 Very nice...

Fb10cf8e5dbac271762e13721181d5dc

(453)

on February 22, 2012
at 11:45 PM

Simply deciding not to buy or keep those things in the house isn't too militant a decision IMO! When you're micromanaging everything they might occasionally eat in school or at a friend's house, then maybe you risk being overbearing, but I don't think the simple decision to not make junk food a regular thing at home is going to give them a complex. I know Sarah Fragoso does a gluten-free-pancake day once a month for her kids though, sounds like something like that might be an okay deal!

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 22, 2012
at 11:41 PM

Was there a question here, maybe edited out?

  • Ba5ca6a500e4f60d1f93c2520265f231

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28 Answers

36
0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

on February 23, 2012
at 12:05 AM

Not really -- it's none of my business what other people eat, or how they feed their children. I'm sure other people get upset looking at my basket full of red meat, grassy butter, eggs, 100% baking chocolate and leg of lamb and are sure I'm going to keel over and die any minute now. It's frankly a waste of my time and energy getting het up about what other people eat or think about what I eat.

I'm still of the opinion that no one diet is optimal for everyone anyway, Paleo is just what happens to work for me.

7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on February 23, 2012
at 12:07 AM

+1 Very nice...

E34fbfa1bca9ae970c9c7313bf9de9f8

(1436)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:37 AM

+1 - came here to say pretty much that.

D465d14cf5ef9da8436caf6435a5af67

(65)

on February 23, 2012
at 05:58 PM

+1, right, and as a carnivore, I don't like to share my fatty meat.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:54 PM

exactly. very well said. thank you.

24
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:13 AM

I don't care about what anyone else eats. I only get upset when people seem to care too much about what I eat.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:40 AM

+1. The last thing anyone needs is more food police, paleo or not.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:33 PM

+1 for too much @loon. Too much junk food.

14
F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:03 AM

What boggles my mind are the parents who have kids with behavioral issues and the fact that they haven't connected the dietary dots.

94a4a87e3d2e1e9160b6ed77678b4bea

(1311)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:13 AM

Agreed - my stepdaughter has had thrush issues since she was a little girl and has major mood swings and tantrems - she still has these problems at 14 years old. No one will listen to my suggestion that she cuts out sugar (or everyone is too lazy)..? Instead she is allowed to eat what she wants as are her siblings which is the only non-Paleo shelf in my pantry (which I frown at).

Fb10cf8e5dbac271762e13721181d5dc

(453)

on February 24, 2012
at 09:15 PM

Yes, this. Diet's never the culprit these days though... people see the brain as something completely separate from the body and the go-to resolutions are often pharmaceuticals because behavioural and emotional issues are too often seen as something that Just Happens and we Just Have to Cope. Too bad, because from what I've seen thus far, so many problems can just go away, or at least become 100x more manageable, with the right way of eating, instead of creating a chemical dependence that MIGHT not be necessary :[ Then again, I suppose some don't... but it's SO worth a try IMO!

C8c230c940ab575bb199cc9ef6d693dc

(85)

on March 20, 2012
at 01:38 PM

Yep. My cousin's kid is a terror. So bad that babysitters quit because she's embarrassing them when they're out. It's sad. But when I suggest changing her diet, I'm looked at like I'm speaking a foreign language.

14
Af3e3615beba642bcafd0f21d64d74f7

on February 22, 2012
at 11:55 PM

No, because when the Zombie Apocalypse is caused by wheat, and The Happening is happening, we will survive; those folks won't. LOL

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:08 AM

More steak for us meat eaters.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:39 PM

I'm pretty sure The Happening (Aka Trips Festival) took place in January 1966 at Longshoreman's Hall in San Francisco. I wasn't there but it interests me. The world took a left turn and hasn't been the same since. You can see Gene Anthony's photo record at wolfgangsvault.com.

12
6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on February 23, 2012
at 12:43 AM

I respect the rights of others to eat whatever they want. Not everyone wants to eat a paleo diet and that's okay with me. I can't be responsible for what other people eat.

I'm sure many of us have eaten our fair share of candy, soda, and breakfast cereal before going paleo, so I can't fault others for what they eat.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:56 PM

why dont you start intervening then, in the name of the community, ulcova? let me know how that goes for you.

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on February 23, 2012
at 04:16 PM

ulcova, I'm sure every parent welcomes a stranger's advice on how to raise their own kids.

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:35 PM

But children aren't given this right. They don't have a choice. And they suffer. And nowadays parents shouldn't be so almighty as they were decades ago. Children should be raised by the community, and the community should know better. Child abuse and domestic abuse is fortunately not considered "family business" anymore.

11
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:09 AM

I tend to believe that everyone is allowed to raise their children as they see fit, and for me to say otherwise because I found something that worked for me is zealotry.

So no, it doesn't bother me at all. It's sad, but the best you can do is be healthy and fit and work to change common wisdom... because no one has the right to tell you what you can feed your family.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:10 AM

+1. We sure don't wanna start sounding like the vegans.

7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on February 23, 2012
at 12:12 AM

Yes. I agree completely. Although I don't think the asker is stating anything should be mandated...I really like these responses so far. It is inspiring to me.

9
0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on February 23, 2012
at 05:06 AM

I'm only upset by what my ex feeds MY kids.

I stuff them with as many nutrient-dense foods as I can when they are at my house, though. I must say they have adjusted better than I initially thought they would to my new "food rules" (dad ain't buying bread, pizza, soda, candy, etc. anymore, so don't ask!), and it has been fun for me watching them discover real food.

6
D6304567ada7ac5e8c6f4e5902270831

on February 23, 2012
at 03:17 AM

I sometimes feel saddened that parents might not have the right information in hand and so with the right (or wrong) set of genetic preconditions they could be making very bad decisions (without ever knowing that) for their kids. It's hard for me personally though to try to impose my beliefs on other parents since after all we're all just a part of a grand experiment that has not yet come to any definite conclusion.

I know my own parents loved me deeply. They also thought a bowel of cereal with bananas and a glass of orange juice was the perfect breakfast. Or a whole wheat English muffin, a bagel with strawberry jam, a bowel of fruit ... that's a healthy breakfast right? </sarcasm> Of course the things my parents fed me hurt my health tremendously. But of course my parents loved me so much and only did what they knew best to do. I have to remember my own parents love and their mistakes when I see other parents acting similarly.

To avoid getting upset with other parents I also remind myself that I can't really say with utmost certainty that the variables in my diet that I suspect improved my health in recent years are really the cause of the improvements I experienced. My strongest conjecture today (based on a few external data points and my experience) is that I have suffered from a "carbohydrate intolerance" throughout my life (since after following a diet that mostly excluded CHO I became much to my surprise asymptomatic of several serious health conditions), but that is after all just a conjecture; there are so many confounders in any such (N=1) experiment: D3? Gluten exclusion? B Vitamins? DHA? ...

I think it is appropriate though to just share with other parents (through social media posts or when asked in person) the types of food I eat, the types of food I prepare for my family, and why I personally believe my family's chosen way of eating affects our health in very positive ways. It's then up to them to decide if they think that's right for their family or not. Some might take a near nihilist approach towards their kids' nutrition and think drinking 2-3 orange sodas a day etc is just fine ... I think we know the likely end to that story and it is rather tragic ... but in many mays to me less tragic than not respecting another family's autonomy.

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on March 20, 2012
at 05:08 PM

Love the "bowel of cereal" slip! Or did you find it more fitting to spell it that way?

6
D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:43 AM

I was one of those parents. I'm not upset so much. Every time I see others feeding their kids that way I get upset at myself at how long it took me to see the error of my way. I'm content living the example right now, maybe someone will ask me about why and I can tell them then.

91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

(2081)

on February 23, 2012
at 03:33 PM

Thank you for this! I, too, fed my kids the SAD when they were growing up, and I feel tremendous guilt about it. My poor 17-year-old, the only chick left in the nest, is now the recipient of me attempting to assuage my conscience - but he's a really good sport about it.

5
De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:00 AM

What makes me sadder is that I was one of those kids eating that junk and that's probably partly to blame for my current health issues. I can't do much with my daughter either because my wife isn't on board and my daughter is exposed to too much junk food elsewhere (daycare, playdates, etc). I just try to minimize the damage, by buying low sugar rice based cereals and providing copious quantities of fruits so she's less tempted to eat the cereal grains. Not much we can do about dairy since my wife stopped breastfeeding at 1 and she still needs the nutrients.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on March 20, 2012
at 08:21 PM

My wife and I both work and I already do all the shopping and cooking (and virtually every other household chore) so, yes, my wife deserves the blame! It bothers me that so many people blame husbands for blaming their wives, leaving no room for a valid complaint :P She just doesn't eat what I cook and that's the problem. I can control what appears on my daughter's plate but I can't control what she learns from watching her mom eat or what she grabs from her plate.

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on March 21, 2012
at 01:00 AM

I suppose then you just have to love and cherish her, regardless, since she is your wife. At the very very least, she should be praised for nursing for a year. It's brutal sometimes, and most women quit LONG before that, paleo or non-paleo!

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on March 20, 2012
at 06:41 PM

Hey, for what it's worth, your wife breastfed for a YEAR, and that's AWESOME and way above average. I only went for 13 months before my daughter quit on me. A year should really be applauded, and if your wife isn't on board, why don't you take over shopping and cooking for her? It bothers me that so many people blame their spouse (often their wife) for what their kids eat. Even if she stays at home, you can still make breakfast and load up the crockpot with dinner before you leave for work!

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on March 21, 2012
at 01:55 PM

Agreed a

3
32652cb696b75182cb121009ee4edea3

(5802)

on February 09, 2013
at 10:15 PM

I've just glanced through this thread, and it seems kind of weird that no one has said: FEEDING KIDS IS FREAKIN' HARD!! And no, I don't mean pickiness. They are pretty adaptable. I mean it is exhausting and time consuming. I have 4 kids. We all eat paleo (me-100%, kids-about 80%), so that means I am cooking meals for 6 people, from scratch, 3 meals a day. Plus snacks. There are weeks that I do nothing but plan food, buy food, prep food, cook food, clean up food, sweep floors, and wash dishes. It can be mind-numbing. I couldn't do it if I didn't absolutely believe it was the best choice for my family.

Even with their nutrient dense foods, my kids are still hungry ALL THE TIME! They are kids. They move and play nonstop. Do I cave occasionally and let them eat junk? Absolutely. I do have to maintain my sanity. We have pizza on Friday nights. We get milkshakes sometimes. They love peanut butter on saltines for a snack. They get to eat Halloween candy. And I am pretty hard core on the nutrition - these are occasional splurges. But some days it is SO HARD to not just throw a box of cheezits at them so they will eat and be quiet! lol

And then there's the cost. I can drive through Wendy's after 4 pm and get 4 kids meals for $1.99 each. Less than $10. Or I can buy a pack of chicken breasts and some fresh vegetables (none of it even grassfed or organic) and spend at least $10, probably more. And then have to cook it. And that's a cheap meal. A grassfed roast is usually $20+, and feeds my family for 1 dinner, plus maybe a little leftover for a few people at lunch. Rice and beans would be a LOT cheaper.... Breakfast: $5 for a half dozen pastured eggs (one meal) or $2 for a box of poptarts that lasts several days?

So all that to say, I can totally understand why a parent who works long hours, isn't educated about nutrition, struggles financially, isn't a very good cook, etc, just does what's easy. Sometimes you are just trying to get through the day. The real question should be, HOW can we make HEALTHY easier? Cheaper? (I don't mean "cheap" - you pay for quality - just not the drastic difference). HOW can we make it more convenient?

Rant over. :)

78fcdeee6ac4ee7d071bbac56b9e359f

(1025)

on February 10, 2013
at 03:42 AM

+1, yes, yes a million times yes. Until more value is put on "domestic work" (taking care of one's own family), a majority of people will not be able to afford the extra monetary cost or cost in time that preparing whole foods requires. Especially true for single parents. If it makes you upset to see what children are eating, volunteer to cook a meal at their house.

3
B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on February 23, 2012
at 10:02 AM

what upsets me is that a mcdonald's hamburger is less expensive than an apple in many places because our governments subsidize crops that make this possible. unless you called your local representative and said that you do not support soy/wheat subsidies, you are putting junk food in these shopping carts; be upset with yourself. the problem will not change until we all stand up to stop it.

3
35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:04 AM

Nope. Other people make all kinds of decisions about their kids that are different from the decisions I make about my kid. Ain't no skin off my back what they do, as long as they're not running around getting all upset about what I do.

3
F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on February 23, 2012
at 12:32 AM

Completely agree, I find it really upsetting - especially as there is nothing you can do! If you tried to educate the parent, well, it's just not worth it. It's most heartbreaking when they actually think the whole-grain, vitamin enriched, equivilent of 2-servings of fruit junk they're feeding their child is actually healthy!

I've seen so many cancer charities selling junk food (lots of it aimed at children) recently and it couldn't make me more annoyed! How can people not realise this is not a good thing?!

3
26166d2f27a57dea221a1417acbdfc2c

(168)

on February 22, 2012
at 11:25 PM

It makes me sad as well, and I'm one of the parents doing it, I had no idea how crap "healthy snacks" were, especially cereals, yuck. It's hard to find a balance though as they are kids and I don't want to become too heavy on the diet front or make a big deal about it, or make them left out not being "allowed" loads of stuff. I do wish it was more common knowledge how much rubbish is in supposedly healthy food and drinks.

Fb10cf8e5dbac271762e13721181d5dc

(453)

on February 22, 2012
at 11:45 PM

Simply deciding not to buy or keep those things in the house isn't too militant a decision IMO! When you're micromanaging everything they might occasionally eat in school or at a friend's house, then maybe you risk being overbearing, but I don't think the simple decision to not make junk food a regular thing at home is going to give them a complex. I know Sarah Fragoso does a gluten-free-pancake day once a month for her kids though, sounds like something like that might be an okay deal!

2
D290734f36a9ae03e3f60e0fa088d7ed

(1304)

on February 23, 2012
at 01:41 PM

On the one hand, people have the right to do whatever they want and eat whatever diet they think is appropriate. As much as I would like to rule the world they are allowed to feed that diet to their kids.

On the other hand, you can't say that what they feed themselves and their kids has no effect on other people. Through the health insurance market I wind up subsidizing the health issues caused by the SAD. Unfortunately, my rising premiums are directly correlated with SAD issues such as Type 2 diabetes. It's sad that more and more children are diabetic as a result of foods their parents give them. It's wrong to allow your kids to get so sick, and I don't like subsidizing your kids' extra visits to the doctor. For that reason, while everyone is entitled to feed their kids the diet of their choice, if a friend or acquaintance has an obese or diabetic 8-year old I reserve the right to butt in where I am not welcome and offer unsolicited dietary advice.

On a cautionary note, it is certainly possible that a big study could come out tomorrow proving that a paleolithic diet is extremely unhealthy. It's unlikely, but dietary science seems rather fluid and every day new benefits and drawbacks of a particular nutrient are discovered. We should be careful in assuming we have a monopoly on dietary wisdom.

2
Ace430e8b57ff082604df932c04c49da

on February 23, 2012
at 01:18 PM

I think it's more the brainwashing that gets me. The colorful wonderbread truck, iron kids bread, Ronald McDonald, Trix are for kids, etc. Despite what healthy choices parents are willing to suggest or provide for their kids, the campaigns of fun & tasty pervade these kids minds on a daily basis. -Billy

2
F593aadd1b7c28bdffd510a2a3d1ce58

(190)

on February 23, 2012
at 04:35 AM

I just went through this with my sister and her son... he's getting in trouble every day at school and she'd rather let them medicate him and spank him with a belt daily than change his diet. Bottom line is I had to let go because it's her kid not mine. So it's none of my business what other people do and I don't offer advice unless I'm asked for it. I can only control myself!

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on May 24, 2012
at 12:27 AM

Where on earth is she that someone is using a belt on the child?!

1
90c2bfe21424da87d37500ed528fbc77

on February 23, 2012
at 12:07 PM

I used to work at a daycare (3-4 year olds) and I would be horrified by what some of the parents sent their kids in with. It made me feel bad to even serve it to the kids, but I didn't have a choice. It broke my heart to have to give a child a donut and a slushee at 8am, or feed a baby McDonald's, but they weren't my kids and I had to feed them what their parents packed.

The best I could do was model healthy habits for the kids and encourage them to make good choices, like eating their fruits and veggies. I would always pack healthy, paleo lunches for myself to at least set a good example. One little girl in particular starting asking her mom to pack her eggs because they had protein :)

1
16d5d61046d3b3db6d24483fa0b79cc8

on February 23, 2012
at 11:42 AM

On one level it doesn't bother me b/c who am I to say how someone should raise their kids. But on another level it does get to me where I just wanna be like, c'mon really? A shopping cart of soda and ice cream and chips but no water, fruit or vegetables? Idk. The only time it really got to me was when I was a waiter at a local diner. This was waaaaaaay before I had any clue what Paleo was, but these 2 giants came in with their maybe 6 year old son and the kid was huge too. They had pancakes with ice cream, the father also had this huge pasta meal...also as much coke as humanly possible, then at the end the father orders a round of ice cream sundaes with the works for every one. The kid told his dad he wasn't hungry and the father lashed out at him and told him to shut up, he puts the food on the table and that his son would have to eat all teh food that gets put on there. It was the one time I just wanted to be like, you're fucking crazy. Never ever forgot that.

0
936235d66c729f133b855d7ff8996a90

(47)

on February 09, 2013
at 09:49 PM

I take my sisters kids to maccas quite regularly. Their diet sucks anyway and they think its Christmas! (That's advertising for you). I'm not a food fascist but they cannot have coke with me, and only one additive freeish sugar drink. They have to learn to make better choices while eating standard Aussie fare. I'm currently encouraging the boy to eat bacon. "my dad knows fats bad because he's a personal trainer." Can't argue with that! :) The girls already will eat anything. I hope BIL will discover paleo soon.

936235d66c729f133b855d7ff8996a90

(47)

on February 09, 2013
at 10:50 PM

+1 to RK rant. Especially in someone else's kitchen! I'm thinking of getting my sister a pressure cooker, that is pretty much how I bother to cook just for one! Do your kids like bone broth? I haven't tried that yet on them. I think coconut rice and banana is pretty paleo & kids do need the carbs, they love it.

0
Fd7b128cf714044a86d8bd822c7a8992

(4292)

on March 20, 2012
at 05:19 PM

Am I upset? yes.

Is it my business to bother the parents or try to "convert" them? No. Everyone's diet is influenced by many factors (religion, allergies/intolerances, what they like and dislike the taste of, cultural trends, emotions, socioeconomic status, etc.) I've found a diet that works best FOR ME. It's presumptuous and rude to assume that a random stranger will thrive equally well on the exact same diet, and it's completely out of line to accost people in the grocery store to proselytize at them about their diet. I wouldn't want them doing it to me, either.

0
9adcb94646e19ebafce76084e6cc2e2a

(140)

on March 20, 2012
at 04:05 PM

Paleo/Primal is a way of life, but it's not a religion. There aren't any "Paleo Sins" that need atonement, for you or for others. The only thing you can really do is live by example and hope others will follow... kinda like religion.

0
C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on March 20, 2012
at 12:34 PM

My downstairs neighbor just had her 3rd baby. She smoked during the pregnancy and in the infants face soon after birth (stroller at store). I am sorry but I find it hard to just "mind my own business" or "not tell people how to raise their kids" etc. I smoked for 7 years... I know a thing or two about how nasty it is. Was the child harmed by one puff of smoke in the face ??? probably not. Was the child harmed by one mcdonalds cheeseburger probably not... But still I have much in difficulty when it comes to "look the other way" to harmful behavior like that.

0
778b36f4f699f202de135ef176fe9ab7

on February 23, 2012
at 05:33 PM

It makes me sad, but it is their choice as parents. What annoys me is when the parents who feed their kids food I deam to be crap are assigned snack day at school. Yesterday it was oreos for preschoolers at 10am. That is what kills me. My daughter, who is generally pretty smart about food, is fed oreos at 10am at SCHOOL. Can you say sugar crash in the afternoon, when she's at home with me? That is what gets me going. When those people make bad choices that affect me and my family. We have snack day on Monday. My daughter wants to bring apples and nut butter and white milk. I will gladly spend the (probably) $20 on a good snack, 1/2 the kids will throw it away, and the next parent will shell out a $5 bill and bring Chips Ahoy. It drives me crazy...

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 23, 2012
at 02:47 PM

Not really. I was taught from an early age to make my own, for better or worse, and usually worse. That's what kids miss out on most when they're given ready-to-eat stuff.

What bothers me is lack of sense in how much to eat. I don't think that certain foods turn us into zombie gluttons. We just don't have any sense about how to deal with superabundance.

0
A4587cfef29863db612c43f89c202cc1

on February 23, 2012
at 02:42 PM

Yes, it's sad and upsetting. Children are mistreated all over the world: bombed, starved, abused and in the western world - overfed junk food. I feel for them all, but I just don't have the emotional energy to get incredibly upset about it. Do that and you will wear yourself out.

0
4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 23, 2012
at 12:33 PM

Yes, it bothers me. I don't care one single bit what other adults eat or drink or smoke or inject, but I can get furious about what they feed their offspring. I grew up at a time and in a place where children were still considered property of their parents and there was no such thing as child abuse, except if you killed them. That has fortunately changed. But children depend on their parents for food and shelter. I know that most parents do their best and are mislead by big food and pharma, for themselves and their children. But I also think that any adult human being should have enough brain cells to at least for a split second think outside the box and follow instincts and decide that coke and fruit loops are as appropriate for children as vodka and cigarettes. I am also one who approves of government measures like in France to remove children from their homes if fed a vegan diet just like as if they were otherwise abused. I don't expect everyone to feed their children the absolute paleo approved super diet, there is a wide range, but many things that are given to kids nowadays as "food" remind me of decades ago when Nestle sent tons of baby formula to African mothers in a campaign that it was better and more nutritious than their breast milk, don't remember all the details but I do remember that Nestle was boycotted for years in Europe (where I lived). I should add that I don't have any children or grandchildren so it's easy for me to say, but I was a child once depending on my caregivers and remember it well.

I should also add that when I was growing up breakfast cereal was a bowl of organic oatmeal, meat was free range, eggs were as well and fresh daily, artificial ingredients were unheard of, fruit was local and eaten when in season, food in general was little processed and packaged, dairy was a big thing there and then, but raw and fresh daily picked up at the farm, and yogurt was home-made. That changed radically only a few years later but the cereal aisles in American grocery stores to this day seem very alien to me. And how someone can consider that food and not a drug. When I went paleo I only found back to my roots but without the oatmeal.

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