1

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Vibram toe pain

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 13, 2011 at 12:06 AM

So after reading about vibram KSOs i started running differently and after about three 4km runs with my different running style i bought a pair. The first run felt amazing except for the fact that near the end i started to feel a pain at the base of my right second toe. I thought nothing of it, just the pains of getting used to a drastically different running shoe. But after a week on my second time out at the same distance the pain reappeared about halfway through. I managed to finish my route but the pain was about a seven out of ten. its winter so the route i run on is ashphalt with snow caked on it for the most part.

The pain pretty much completely goes away when i stop running and i can walk just fine but when i stand on my fore foot i feel some tenderness right at the base of that second toe. I dont have morton's toe and my feet are otherwise healthy but my question is: could this be a case of too much too fast and it will just take some more getting used to or does this sound like a problem that might seem like the end of my short virbam career?

any advice or stretching tips?

really love these shoes and dont want to have to go back to my comparitively clunky running shoes.

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on May 31, 2011
at 11:01 PM

You're welcome, Sue. Enjoy your shoes. Your feet and brain will thank you for them! Being able to feel the ground with the nerves in my feet completely changed running for me. I find that I run a bit faster and have better endurance. I always felt pitched a bit forward in traditional running shoes. Looking back, I realize how much energy was being wasted rather than transferred.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on May 31, 2011
at 06:03 PM

Great article Travis, thank you so much!!

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on February 13, 2011
at 03:49 AM

Good point about the disadvantages of trying to be 'macho' which often just turns out to be more like just being stupid! ;-)

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on February 13, 2011
at 12:45 AM

You're welcome. Love my KSOs too!

Ca0a23ecea4a094eb03a27fc9040dad0

(35)

on February 13, 2011
at 12:34 AM

This article was very helpful and encouraging. Didnt think I would get an answer so fast. Thanks a bunch!

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6 Answers

best answer

4
95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on February 13, 2011
at 12:20 AM

It sounds like too much too soon. Be sure to transition to the vibrams, don't just take off in them. See this article.

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on February 13, 2011
at 12:45 AM

You're welcome. Love my KSOs too!

Ca0a23ecea4a094eb03a27fc9040dad0

(35)

on February 13, 2011
at 12:34 AM

This article was very helpful and encouraging. Didnt think I would get an answer so fast. Thanks a bunch!

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on May 31, 2011
at 06:03 PM

Great article Travis, thank you so much!!

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on May 31, 2011
at 11:01 PM

You're welcome, Sue. Enjoy your shoes. Your feet and brain will thank you for them! Being able to feel the ground with the nerves in my feet completely changed running for me. I find that I run a bit faster and have better endurance. I always felt pitched a bit forward in traditional running shoes. Looking back, I realize how much energy was being wasted rather than transferred.

5
5b69a02dadcae753771921d913909215

(1457)

on February 13, 2011
at 12:43 AM

Yes. Too much too fast. You just have to be careful if you are going to start simulating barefooting and not actually have your flesh in contact with the ground. I have had the same toe thing and plantar facitis since starting my barefoot journey. Now I can do trail runs for 5 miles in minimal shoes (less than 1 cm of shoe under my foot). The thing that helped me the most was getting rid of any type of arch support in my shoes that I wear everyday and then walking a lot. I had a lot of foot pain at first... walking, running, everything (too much too soon). Also, if you truly go barefoot your skin will let you know when to stop before you do any real damage. If you can walk without pain then I would stick with that until you can run without pain and then only run until you feel that first twinge telling you to stop... often times you can walk a bit and start running again without the twinge, but just know your are flirting with making your injury worse.

After years of listening to my body and pushing through pain I have learned that your body knows what's going on but you have to listen. Yes, you can run through pain and your body will recover eventually. However, your body is sending you those signals so that if you have the option to stop (i.e. you don't need to be running) you will know that you should. Personally, I was always taught as a child / young adult that succumbing to pain is a sign of weakness and that you should push through "unless a bone is sticking-out". Now I realize that I am perfectly capable of running with pain shooting up my leg but that I shouldn't do it if I want to make good progress and be injury free.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on February 13, 2011
at 03:49 AM

Good point about the disadvantages of trying to be 'macho' which often just turns out to be more like just being stupid! ;-)

1
9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on February 13, 2011
at 03:33 PM

I went through the same thing. Slow down. As soon as I felt my calves get strong I started opening up my runs, and that's when the "top of the foot" pain started. I've read that's because the increased strength of the calves is too much for the ligaments in the foot, which have not gotten strong yet. They take a lot longer.

The frustrating thing is, once that pain sets in, it takes a long time to wring out. I would say I dealt with it for 3-4 months. However, it's now completely gone for me.

The other thing that helped was to really pay attention to form. There are some good barefoot running sites out there that can help, but the best visualization I've come up with is too think of your feet as being on a wheel, and rotate them around and through their impact with the ground. My heel barely touches the ground. I would say only the skin of my heel touches, with little compression, just to give me sensory feedback.

You'll find that good form starts to degrade as you push either speed or distance, so that can also be a gauge on whether you are doing too much too soon.

Good luck!

1
Edf0a0707486217d16426de8df92efb7

on February 13, 2011
at 03:36 AM

Listen to your feet and also take a look at the fit of your vibrams. They are great in moderation in my opinion (I have had my share of nagging injuries with them thru 1.5 yrs of use) but if the fit is not close to perfect you are susceptible to injuries. Part of the problem is that everyones feet are different bit vibram models are all the same. Good luck.....and yes....take it slowly too!

0
Bf874493de8e881dfc0bc6461e964c57

on August 11, 2012
at 11:58 PM

My feet hurt! I'm on day two and have walked a total of a block. I think I may lose my big toe nail.

0
C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on February 13, 2011
at 12:47 AM

is your second toe longer than your big toe? if so that explains it.. alot of people who have that have the same problem with vibrams

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