1

votes

Running! How many miles is too many??

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 03, 2012 at 2:41 AM

I love running. I havent gone for a jog in over a year now and im itching to get back into it. That being said, i train for kettlebell sport and all of my fitness goals (besides pullup) relate to that. How many miles per run and how many times a week could i run without hurting my performance in KB sport. I plan to keep my running to the trails.

Im 19 and lean

C116f7e54620c6003b67cd4450a298cd

on May 03, 2012
at 04:48 PM

I totally agree with PBO. That's my regime. I LOVE to run, but I also LOVE to get DONE with it and spend a bit more time on the other things in life: my wife, kids, preparing meals, and enjoying eating them, other hobbies, etc. This notion of "madatory runs to loose weight" is a very modern phenomenon.

C116f7e54620c6003b67cd4450a298cd

on May 03, 2012
at 04:45 PM

nice!!!!!!!!!!!

C116f7e54620c6003b67cd4450a298cd

on May 03, 2012
at 04:44 PM

Agreed! Run Forest run! However, if you're going too long, too often, and keeping that heart rate tacking at that constant rate, you may be running (from something?). We're a society of anxious, vein, souls. Just make sure your life is in check. That's usually the key. Good luck on your KB, running won't hurt it.

81fca18329e68e227cdfef3857bfef96

(1320)

on May 03, 2012
at 03:50 PM

The 'fat burning' zone is just a common term to describe a heart rate zone that will stress your cardio but not cause you to enter a catabolic state. You burn a higher % of fat but not more overall calories undertaking low intensity activities than higher intenisty. The idea is that anything causing catabolism will lengthen your recover time and reduce, if not outright eliminate, the benefits of strength training. That is why low intensity activities, walking being among them, are recommended to maintain cardio conditioning when a program is prioritizing strength training.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 03, 2012
at 02:30 PM

"the 'fat burning' zone" hahahahaha,.

D290734f36a9ae03e3f60e0fa088d7ed

(1304)

on May 03, 2012
at 01:58 PM

Do what feels good. I believed we evolved to be able to run long distance so don't feel like you can't go long. But don't force it.

B1d3dfe470ba901b2b107545b923b024

(184)

on May 03, 2012
at 11:08 AM

by the same token though he says he's lean so the fat burning properties you tout for walking probably aren't needed, to scratch the itch i like the idea of running barefoot and he'll know when his body has had enough

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on May 03, 2012
at 09:41 AM

Love this answer. Barefoot!

81fca18329e68e227cdfef3857bfef96

(1320)

on May 03, 2012
at 03:07 AM

Crossfit Endurance is a great program that successfully mixes strength and endurance training with an obvious emphasis on endurance. If only general Crossfit put as much thought into it's programming and periodization as Crossfit Endurance (or CF Football for that matter).

81fca18329e68e227cdfef3857bfef96

(1320)

on May 03, 2012
at 03:03 AM

lol Some people hate running, some people like it. I actually really enjoy walking. The posters goals are primarily strength related so he should focus on that until he achieves his goals in that area before incorporating heavy endurance training. If he begins running 15+ miles a week, he will only hurt his strength training efforts.

32937bdb4caf053e7aa39693fadd2282

(547)

on May 03, 2012
at 02:56 AM

cuz walking is boring AF and running feels great!!

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13 Answers

5
Ba09704971e33481f5716c4790648966

(1794)

on May 03, 2012
at 02:45 AM

When your feet start to bleed, you've gone too far.

2
2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on May 03, 2012
at 01:27 PM

I would say it's not an absolute number but more of your attitude and stress (what you can handle). Know your body's limit.

For me it was easy to over do it. One month I am jogging 2 miles a day, few months later 6, after a year 10 miles. At some point I was no longer gaining benefits, and instead was starting to see problems (low energy, one dimensional in terms of my athletic performance, muscle loss, foot problems).

If you love to run, then run as much as you want. For most, running is viewed as a mandatory activity to lose weight. The problem is the stress is causes, injury, and for me anyway really promoted muscle loss.

Personally I rather walk a lot more, do a few sprints, and some lifting.

C116f7e54620c6003b67cd4450a298cd

on May 03, 2012
at 04:48 PM

I totally agree with PBO. That's my regime. I LOVE to run, but I also LOVE to get DONE with it and spend a bit more time on the other things in life: my wife, kids, preparing meals, and enjoying eating them, other hobbies, etc. This notion of "madatory runs to loose weight" is a very modern phenomenon.

2
5b5abb28f3cacf4f5a01497f2895d072

(238)

on May 03, 2012
at 06:36 AM

Nothing wrong with running as long as it's not a hug long grind. One of the ways to keep a maximum distance limit is to run without any aids or shoes - braces shoes, supports et al. are designed to help bypass problems. It's far healthier to listen to the weakest links in your body and stop when they've had enough.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on May 03, 2012
at 09:41 AM

Love this answer. Barefoot!

1
01adafcb4dd4147c6af543f61eee60a8

on May 03, 2012
at 09:47 AM

I love running too and I dont stress over how long I do it for. I usually have 3 days a week running around 6miles and a longer run on a Sunday. Ignore the "chronic cardio" cult.

1
B5ce28b0b79ce45955a3e8794641a365

on May 03, 2012
at 02:58 AM

I run twice a week following workouts from CrossFit Endurance. Minimal mileage and keeps the itch scratched! I still participate in half and full marathons, and have even improved my speed.

81fca18329e68e227cdfef3857bfef96

(1320)

on May 03, 2012
at 03:07 AM

Crossfit Endurance is a great program that successfully mixes strength and endurance training with an obvious emphasis on endurance. If only general Crossfit put as much thought into it's programming and periodization as Crossfit Endurance (or CF Football for that matter).

0
1ec4e7ca085b7f8d5821529653e1e35a

(5506)

on May 03, 2012
at 07:30 PM

Run as much as is enjoyable and stop when it isn't and you won't go too far.

EDIT: Aerobic adaptation is optimized at 30-40 minutes of training. Keep your running under that amount of time. If you're running more miles in that time I'd say that's ok. I will try to find my source but for now you'll have to trust me :)

0
Medium avatar

(2338)

on May 03, 2012
at 03:24 PM

yeah man i avoided running like the plague when i first heard of "chronic cardio" but i also found myself itching for it... now i sprint in the woods and jump over obstacles (i.e. streams, trees, bushes, etc.) it is so much fun and it's an awesome way to release pent up energy. i would say run as much as you feel like it... your only 19 as long as your doing it because you want to and not because you feel like you have to i think you'll be fine.

0
Ac7edffeaea00e2076762ea16d19c239

(192)

on May 03, 2012
at 03:17 PM

I Run 3 times a week and CrossFit 3 times a week. I stretch for 15 minutes and then run for 45 minutes...that is as long as I can take it before I get distracted by shiny things...some days it is under 2 miles and other days is around 4 miles... I just listen to my body and do what I can.

C116f7e54620c6003b67cd4450a298cd

on May 03, 2012
at 04:45 PM

nice!!!!!!!!!!!

0
5cd8441bd01fc10816085bfc092477c4

(925)

on May 03, 2012
at 01:33 PM

I agree with the above^ Listen to your body. I used to run long distances, but the wear and tear on my body just wasn't worth it. Now I run a couple miles maybe 2 times a week and do Crossfit the other days.

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on May 03, 2012
at 06:24 AM

Sprint once a week and go for a longish... (Under one hour) run once a week in a beautiful location perhaps with a friend.

0
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on May 03, 2012
at 05:18 AM

The main thing is not to go overboard right at the start. Run a couple of miles, then wait a few days and do it again. Build up gradually until you're running however long you want to. You're 19 and in shape so you should have no problem with this. And Rebecca's right, a few running sprints are a good way to get in some outdoor HIIT. I think if you run slowly 2-3 times a week and maybe one sprint or hill session it won't hamper your kettlebell performance at all - just don't do ultras!

I think it's great that you do the sports you like. If running is fun for you, then just do it!

0
B97bb053b69b8a1e404c226afced44a0

on May 03, 2012
at 04:03 AM

I run 4km once a week and do a sprint session once a week. It keeps me happy. The sprints improve endurance, strength, and speed, too. I have a 5km race at the end of the month - my first since 2004! If it goes well, I will do a couple 10kms before the end of the year.

0
81fca18329e68e227cdfef3857bfef96

(1320)

on May 03, 2012
at 02:50 AM

Why run? You can gain many of the benefits you get from running without the wear and tear just by walking. Buy a heart monitor, keep your heart rate in your upper 'fat burning' zone, and walk for 40-80 minutes 4 to 5 times a week. Walking is low intensity and will not effect your recovery time from your other training. I do not run but walk as stated. I occasionally compete in a 5K with my GF. My last 5K was 28:30. Not blazing but better than many who run 5 times a week.

On a side note, I have gotten bitten by the pull up bug too. I'm up to 3x5 with 55 pounds. Hoping to get to 75 pounds. :)

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 03, 2012
at 02:30 PM

"the 'fat burning' zone" hahahahaha,.

81fca18329e68e227cdfef3857bfef96

(1320)

on May 03, 2012
at 03:50 PM

The 'fat burning' zone is just a common term to describe a heart rate zone that will stress your cardio but not cause you to enter a catabolic state. You burn a higher % of fat but not more overall calories undertaking low intensity activities than higher intenisty. The idea is that anything causing catabolism will lengthen your recover time and reduce, if not outright eliminate, the benefits of strength training. That is why low intensity activities, walking being among them, are recommended to maintain cardio conditioning when a program is prioritizing strength training.

B1d3dfe470ba901b2b107545b923b024

(184)

on May 03, 2012
at 11:08 AM

by the same token though he says he's lean so the fat burning properties you tout for walking probably aren't needed, to scratch the itch i like the idea of running barefoot and he'll know when his body has had enough

81fca18329e68e227cdfef3857bfef96

(1320)

on May 03, 2012
at 03:03 AM

lol Some people hate running, some people like it. I actually really enjoy walking. The posters goals are primarily strength related so he should focus on that until he achieves his goals in that area before incorporating heavy endurance training. If he begins running 15+ miles a week, he will only hurt his strength training efforts.

32937bdb4caf053e7aa39693fadd2282

(547)

on May 03, 2012
at 02:56 AM

cuz walking is boring AF and running feels great!!

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