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Runner... Advice to minimize issues?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 20, 2012 at 1:33 PM

I am a runner who has completed 6 marathons. I LOVE running and I know that many on here have issues with constant cardio. I am currently putting together my next training plan and am considering training without long runs since those seem to be the most damaging.

My first question is why is jogging so bad while walking is encouraged? My body is so used to running that my heart rate is about the same during both activities. Runners don't train for marathons at full speed every day, but rather most runs are simply slow jogs and then weekly tempo runs are used for speed. I'm hoping someone can clear this up.

My second question is geared for any other runners out there. How do you train with minimal damage to your body? I don't need long runs to complete or even PR in the race I've realized. Would back to back days of 12s be easier on my body than a 20? Or even 3 consecutive days of 8-9s. If done regularly, any of these plans can result in a great race. If there any other runners out there, id love to hear how you train.

103a639b040a17bb579084287f2a5307

(608)

on January 04, 2013
at 12:27 AM

While HIIT can be very beneficial, adding HIIT on top of current workouts would likely aggravate potential issues. If you wanted to do HIIT, substitute it for one of your short/fast runs

2f83028f9830b25f7c21109197176d9e

(328)

on December 20, 2012
at 02:51 PM

KarenOH, I'm using this method as well. Have you run a marathon based on the training yet? I'm early on in the plan as my race isn't until March

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6 Answers

1
45e51fee7d295e523ff4134f76c3ba05

(923)

on December 20, 2012
at 02:30 PM

I follow the Hanson method and I really like it. You do longer miles during the week with speed, strength and tempo workouts. Your easy runs are really easy. Your long run is no longer than 16 miles, but it simulates the last 16 miles of the marathon because it teaches you to run on tired legs. They just put out a new book that really explains their methods in an easy to understand manner.

I don't really pay too much attention to the "chronic cardio" hype, as long as overtraining is avoided. You need to keep your easy runs in the fat-burning aerobic heart rate range. A heart rate monitor really helps. I suggest reading anything by Phil Maffetone for more on this. Hanson's method also dovetails with Maffetone.

2f83028f9830b25f7c21109197176d9e

(328)

on December 20, 2012
at 02:51 PM

KarenOH, I'm using this method as well. Have you run a marathon based on the training yet? I'm early on in the plan as my race isn't until March

0
103a639b040a17bb579084287f2a5307

on January 04, 2013
at 12:57 AM

First of all, endurance exercise does NOT equal chronic cardio. If you enjoy the activity, train at an appropriate pace, AND allow yourself sufficient recovery periods, then you are unlikely to run into the problems associted with chronic cardio. Clearly, if you don't enjoy an activity, then it will be stressful (aka bad). The appropriate pace will of course depend on your fitness level and technique (remember that a 40 minute 10pm for a well trained runner may be less stressful on the body than a walk around the block is to an overweight couch potato). And finally, sufficient rest allows for improvement, while insufficient rest leads to injuries, overtraining and "chronic cardio".

As for minimizing long term problems: • Only run if you love running and feel like it • Work with a therapist or kinesiologist to ensure correct biomechanics, posture, alignment and technique • Ensure that you are getting sufficient nutrients • Get enough rest • Include a variety of activities including natural movement, flexibility and strength training

Training suggestion: • one long run per week followed by a day or two off • two to four shorter workouts, including a maximum of two interval/tempo runs which should be followed by an easy or off day • at least one, or better two days per week off training • In summary, max 5 runs per week (3 harder runs, 2 short and easy)

0
62fafa8cb15af7c562fa8c270f7b6174

on January 04, 2013
at 12:24 AM

One of my favorite strategies to minimize running injuries is to find your training stimulus in terrain rather than tempo. So I will choose certain hills, for the downhill as well as the uphill. Keeping good form and a steady pace protects my body while the terrain provides the resistance.

This is different than going to a track and running 3 different paces on the same level surface, or running tempo runs on a flat course.

I think running 20 plus or over 2 1/2 hours isn't necessary every week, maybe once a month in the few months leading up.

The bias against running longer distances in 'paleo' advice isn't very persuasive to me. I agree that short distance speed is absolutely great fun for competition and health while I can't imagine developing a sense of running form by only sprinting at the track. I never liked the idea of road marathons, but love long trail races that require a slower pace and/or power-hiking hilly segments. Learning to budget energy while exercising a territorial need to cover certain distance is what keeps me interested in running. I think there is a very 'paleo' lifestyle component to the runners need to patrol the same training courses, and it is the evil wristwatch that leads to problems.

0
E753cf7753e7be889ca68b1a4203483f

on January 03, 2013
at 09:42 PM

The negative effect seems to be excessive stress on the hearth muscle. That supposedly comes from long bouts of intense running and not so much from the slow jogs. When training for a marathon some long hard runs are needed. That is probably not an issue as long as a sufficient recovery is present on your long term schedule. In my mind that would be like off season training for most of the year with low weekly mileage and little strenuous running. Low weekly mileage is somewhat less than 25/week.

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on December 20, 2012
at 01:57 PM

First, I would not get rid of the long run. I know there are a lot of people out there who are now demonizing the long run. But I have found that the benefit of the long run is not the physical adaptations (which can be achieved in other ways) but rather sharpen your mental strength. Marathons are hard and you are going to be running for 3-4 hours. If you skip on the long runs, how do you prepare for that side?

I think the best way to train with minimal damage is to incorporate sufficient rest and recovery with three runs per week. A track workout, a tempo run, and a long run. On the other days you need to fit in 2-3 recovery workouts. These can be walks, SLOW runs, or (as I recommend) 30-60 minutes slow peddle on a exercise bike. The goal of the recovery run is to get blood and oxygen to the muscles without building lactate acid.

Here's a nice, three workouts per week training plan that I used and I recommend: http://www.wu.ece.ufl.edu/marathon%20training-first%20marathon.pdf

Also, the McMillan calculator is great at helping you find the right pace: http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/

0
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on December 20, 2012
at 01:56 PM

My advice is to incorporate a HIIT training program 1-2 days a week on top of what you already do, making adjustments if necessary.

103a639b040a17bb579084287f2a5307

(608)

on January 04, 2013
at 12:27 AM

While HIIT can be very beneficial, adding HIIT on top of current workouts would likely aggravate potential issues. If you wanted to do HIIT, substitute it for one of your short/fast runs

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