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Paleo marathon training

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 03, 2011 at 3:23 PM

This is more of a general question about marathon training, but I'd like to hear from the paleo community about it:

Can a very fit, but over-running-injury-prone person get away with 5-6 crosstraining sessions and one long run per week and train effectively for a marathon?

7255a87872b75e6f691d84dca769b87e

on September 03, 2011
at 09:06 PM

Pete: I value myself much too much to crossfit and run at the same time. Crossfit is probably harder than my slow running, honestly. Lauren: It took about five months for me, but I didn't figure out it was a stress fracture until about two months in. I was stupid and kept trying to run on it.... after I went to an orthopedist and got evaluated, I took it much more easily, with swimming and biking instead of anything high impact. The doctor recommended taking it easy, but putting some stress on the bone to stimulate a healing process - so I walked alot too.

Fe87afa634afe26f4f6fd956abe0b46a

(565)

on September 03, 2011
at 08:17 PM

AH, I misunderstood. I thought you were planning on doing the WODs on top of the marathon training!

C5c3a1fb34a486366e45afbb5eaaca05

(453)

on September 03, 2011
at 05:45 PM

Just out of curiosity: how long did you wait after the stress fracture until you began running again? (I'm nursing one right now and getting a bit stir crazy)

7255a87872b75e6f691d84dca769b87e

on September 03, 2011
at 04:34 PM

Ahhh and I see that you have answered it there, there, and there. This is my first marathon and my only goal is to finish. I know bicycle sprints wouldn't give a runner the same amount of high impact training as a running sprint, but would the long run be enough high impact training so I don't injure myself when actually running the marathon? Also, I do plyometric intervals once a week: would that work in the same way as a sprint session?

7255a87872b75e6f691d84dca769b87e

on September 03, 2011
at 04:30 PM

I am running-injury prone - the only injuries I've ever garnered were from running six days a week. I pulled my calf (in recommended long distance shoes with a two inch high heel >.< ) and stress-fractured my foot. I would only do high impact (for me, truly taxing) activity twice a week: a long slow run and a plyometric session. The rest is bodyweight strength training and bike rides. I sure as hell would NOT do crossfit WODs while training for a marathon.

Fe87afa634afe26f4f6fd956abe0b46a

(565)

on September 03, 2011
at 03:59 PM

If you're injury prone I would definitely not train 6 days a week. If your main goal is the marathon, forget about your strength and muscles. You can't have it all. You don't need to kill yourself if you just want to do a marathon. But if you want to maintain strength and musculature while also training for a marathon, you might get yourself into trouble. Crossfit, focuses on short, intense training sessions for a reason. Long runs are very taxing.

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2 Answers

1
9f6bfebdd22f2b98145000fef5a70223

on September 04, 2011
at 02:11 AM

Pre-attempting paleo, I was a chronic endurance runner for a decade, a high-weight 60+ miles a week guy with no strength training and a crappy diet. I don't mean typical endurance athlete diet that's horrifying-to-paleos, I mean Hohos and Taco Bell. Never got hurt, not even sore for very long after many sub-4 hour marathons; maybe a little the next day. Not even that young during this time either. During this time, my running partners who were much more regular in their workouts, had a much better diet, and were leaner frequently got use injuries. My point is just that, just as we know people who adapt well to paleo and people who don't, there are people who adapt better to different forms of exercise. Lifting makes me feel like crap but I force myself to do it because over the long run I think add it will be good for me. Whereas running 20 miles at a go never has, and I'm not built like a runner at all. People differ, and we find our comparative advantage in one thing or another, and I think people in various parts of the fitness world forget this.

0
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 03, 2011
at 03:44 PM

It depends on what you mean by effectively. Are you going to be competitive with the elite runners? Unlikely. Are you going to finish the race with a time you can be proud of? Probably.

I ran a marathon last year. My training regimen was rather "primal." I did a few sprint days each week and one long run each week. I recognized that I needed rest in-between each of those day and so I limited my HIITS and STRENGTH training (I didn't yet do CrossFit). My long runs were very long and very slow, but they did rip my muscles apart because of their length. My sprints were typical sprints.

P.S. This question has been asked before: here, here, and here.

7255a87872b75e6f691d84dca769b87e

on September 03, 2011
at 04:34 PM

Ahhh and I see that you have answered it there, there, and there. This is my first marathon and my only goal is to finish. I know bicycle sprints wouldn't give a runner the same amount of high impact training as a running sprint, but would the long run be enough high impact training so I don't injure myself when actually running the marathon? Also, I do plyometric intervals once a week: would that work in the same way as a sprint session?

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