1

votes

Nutritional advice for runners

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 23, 2013 at 1:04 PM

I subscribe to a weekly news letter for runners. This week it contains diet tips for runners. I am new to the Paleo diet and am trying to make my mind up based on what I have learned reading about the benefits of eating Paleo. I feel this week's tips contain inaccuracies. I will include the tips and am wondering if anyone can help confirm/explain why these are not valid:

  1. Your body works a lot like a car; it needs fuel to function effectively Your muscle cells function similarly to a fuel tank, stored carbohydrates serve as a rapid source of fuel. Eat carbohydrate-rich foods prior to you workout to reduce the drain on your body's stored energy.
  2. The most effective way to fuel up your body is with energy rich nutrients Eat a large meal four to six hours before your work out. Eat a lighter meal two to three hours before physical activity. Grab a snack 30 minutes prior to exercise. If you're an athlete, 50 to 60 percent of your diet should be made up of carbohydrates.
  3. Recharge your battery Refuel during workouts that are more than 30 minutes in length. Drink fluids that have simple carbohydrates.
  4. Tap into your reserve fuel tank for extended bouts of physical activity Your body begins to burn fat as fuel ("in the flames of carbohydrates") after about 18 to 20 minutes of aerobic exercise (long to moderate distance).
  5. Hydrate, Hydrate and Re-hydrate It is imperative to replenish the liquids you lose when working out. While exercising, be sure to drink fluids every 10 minutes -- don't wait until you are actually thirsty.
  6. Protein is key to muscle maintenance and growth Your body must receive adequate amounts of protein to function properly and repair damaged tissue.Be sure your body receives the recommended daily protein requirements: 1.0 to 2.0 grams per kilogram body weight (1.0-1.5 grams/kg for "ball" sports such as tennis, golf, football and squash and 1.50-2.0 grams/kg for the more extreme sports such as marathon running and body building).
  7. Protein vs. Carbohydrates Carbohydrates are instant fuel for the muscles. Protein assists recovery and repair, helping damaged muscles maintain muscle mass and increase girth.
  8. Maximising your fuelling and refuelling efforts Be sure to eat a carbohydrate-rich food within 30 minutes of completing your exercise regime. Take in easily digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into glucose and stored in muscles as glycogen (quick fuel).
  9. Reducing recovery time Adequate protein. Antioxidant nutrients. Adequate fluid.
  10. Use supplementation to your advantage Vitamins and minerals help assist the body's chemical reactions and regulatory processes. Antioxidant nutrients can help you reduce your recovery time. Supplements are especially beneficial for athletes susceptible to decreased immune systems.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on June 07, 2013
at 09:33 AM

Yeah heard the Kruse interview, pretty confusing. I am still pretty unconvinced that zero-carb performance can exist. Whether we will start seeing if there is any truth in this in the next few years will be interesting.

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on June 06, 2013
at 02:39 PM

I'm researching him also, specially since his latest podcast with JK, the recommendations that he has recently gotten from him as to how to eat and train go for sure against everything is known in current sports science... if they're spot on the implications could be huge but if it proves wrong... could be an epic fail to us. Its fascinating nonetheless. Until you get everything crystal clear I might start by trying to stick to my proven macro ratios pre-intra-post by just switching the 'offending' carbs for their 'safe' counterpart.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 23, 2013
at 03:51 PM

fred, there is a difference between training fasted for a recreational runner and fueling for training or a race for elite runners.

4610451431ec7155c87a5698be682a95

(1122)

on May 23, 2013
at 02:19 PM

1) Many workout and run fasted - including me. 2) Don't really need to point out the inconsistencies on this one. 3) For a runner, 30 min at a fat burning pace is only 3-5 miles. No real need to refuel or even drink. The rest are pretty solid. I will say that #4 is a toss-up in that if one runs at 50-60% of max HR then you are really burning fat during your exercise session.

B600e1b5e9996e2b77952a23e5e742b4

on May 23, 2013
at 01:29 PM

Thanks, I suppose the recommendation I was least comfortable with is that 50-60 percent of an athlete's diet should consist of carbohydrates, which is more than I am including currently. Will do some more reading.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 23, 2013
at 01:25 PM

which part do you feel is inconsistent?

4610451431ec7155c87a5698be682a95

(1122)

on May 23, 2013
at 01:17 PM

many of these are correct depending on where you are in your training, what your goals are, the distances you run, etc. search in the tags for "running" and "marathon". there is much to read. also, you can approach your eating/running in many different ways. there are even "keto" running blogs. google is your friend.

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1 Answers

1
Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on May 23, 2013
at 01:18 PM

I wont answer you directly, but have a look around http://www.bengreenfieldfitness.com who eats an ancestral diet and is a successful triathlete.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on June 07, 2013
at 09:33 AM

Yeah heard the Kruse interview, pretty confusing. I am still pretty unconvinced that zero-carb performance can exist. Whether we will start seeing if there is any truth in this in the next few years will be interesting.

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on June 06, 2013
at 02:39 PM

I'm researching him also, specially since his latest podcast with JK, the recommendations that he has recently gotten from him as to how to eat and train go for sure against everything is known in current sports science... if they're spot on the implications could be huge but if it proves wrong... could be an epic fail to us. Its fascinating nonetheless. Until you get everything crystal clear I might start by trying to stick to my proven macro ratios pre-intra-post by just switching the 'offending' carbs for their 'safe' counterpart.

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