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Kicking chronic cardio while achieving goals?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 27, 2012 at 7:40 PM

As some of you may remember, I recently had a wisdom tooth out, and ever since instead of running I've been either going on the elliptical trainer or walking briskly with a set of dumbells. I'm starting to realize I was in a state of chronic cardio and one of the reasons I'm having a hard time achieving my fat loss goals. When I come home from a brisk walk with a set of dumbells I feel relaxed and refreshed and energized, and though I love running, whenever I woud come home from a run I would be winded and exhausted and hungry enough to eat a wolly mammoth. I do love running and would like to start again as soon as my wisdom tooth is all better, I ran two 5ks this year and one of my goals for 2013 is to run a 10k, but at the same time I want to end the chronic cardio cycle. Can I do both?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 28, 2012
at 03:16 AM

Agreed, <10K is not chronic cardio. That's simply good activity.

B41cdb2253976ba9b429dd608d02c21f

(1495)

on December 27, 2012
at 10:07 PM

I tend to agree. 5 and 10k's can be completed in less than an hour and don't really require a lot of training. I follow a Crossfit Endurance-type template for triathlon conditioning and I find it to be physically friendly and great for continued improvement (I only continue to get faster). I don't know your previous story or if you have even told us - if you don't already lift weights, I would highly recommend adding weightlifting 2 or 3 times a week (preferably on non-endurance days). The endurance training is a little counter-productive, but you don't have to lift massive amounts.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on December 27, 2012
at 08:29 PM

Not overtraining is key. You don't want to raise cortisol, that will stall fat loss. One up.

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3 Answers

3
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on December 27, 2012
at 08:34 PM

Bias Alert: I am a runner, I love running!

IMO, I would not call training for 5ks and 10 ks chronic cardio. I suppose the implementation of such a training plan could be.... but if you are running less than 30 miles a week, you probably are not doing chronic cardio unless you have a terrible training program.

The best training plans I have seen are The Furman University FIRST training programs (http://www2.furman.edu/sites/first/Pages/default.aspx). What I really like about the FIRST programs is that they incorporate three runs, Track Runs, Tempo Runs (Run fast for an extended amount of time), and long runs. That's it, three workouts per week. You can cross train (lifting, recovery runs, elliptical, swimming, yoga, whatever) on 2-3 other days. This allows for (1) Spring Workouts -- Which are critically important to general strength and health as well as mentally helping people break pace barriers. (2) Tempo Runs -- Which, in my experience, are the most important part of a well designed plan. and (3) Long Runs -- least important in my book, but very good at breaking down mental barriers to distances. It's amazing how mentally taxing a 6 or 10 mile race can be.

You used to be able to download all of their training programs from their site, it looks like they blocked some of that. Here's a couple of links:

8k -- http://www2.furman.edu/sites/first/Documents/8K%20Training%20Program.pdf
5k -- http://tampatriteam.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/furman-1st-5k-program.pdf

My personal opinion is, for most people, the 5k program is perfect for 5k and 10k. Your long runs get up to 7-8 miles, I might stretch the tempo runs a bit longer if you are looking for a PR. If you are just looking to complete one, then the you can easily do that!

Good luck!

B41cdb2253976ba9b429dd608d02c21f

(1495)

on December 27, 2012
at 10:07 PM

I tend to agree. 5 and 10k's can be completed in less than an hour and don't really require a lot of training. I follow a Crossfit Endurance-type template for triathlon conditioning and I find it to be physically friendly and great for continued improvement (I only continue to get faster). I don't know your previous story or if you have even told us - if you don't already lift weights, I would highly recommend adding weightlifting 2 or 3 times a week (preferably on non-endurance days). The endurance training is a little counter-productive, but you don't have to lift massive amounts.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 28, 2012
at 03:16 AM

Agreed, <10K is not chronic cardio. That's simply good activity.

3
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on December 27, 2012
at 07:49 PM

Sure, I run 1 10k a year just to see where I am as a benchmark. I do no other running (other than maybe a couple of 400m sprints a week as part of my workouts) and every year since I quit acutally running I've gotten faster. I'm now around a 45 min 10k with no running as training.

For fat loss goals plus trying to stay fit: 1) get good sleep (8-9 hours in a dark room), 2) 2-3 times a week do short (5-7m) intense (100% efforts) workouts.

If you follow the old-school crossfit workouts of 5-7 years ago, you'll be on the right track. But just be careful not to overtrain.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on December 27, 2012
at 08:29 PM

Not overtraining is key. You don't want to raise cortisol, that will stall fat loss. One up.

2
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on December 28, 2012
at 02:28 AM

I wish I could stake claim to this quote:

The best cardio is walking to the squat rack . . .

Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

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