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Couch to 5k Success Stories

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 23, 2012 at 10:49 PM

I just started the Couch to 5k program this week in an attempt to get my fat butt in shape. Has anyone done this before? Anyone have success stories they want to share?

58d456f4c4d551a697e65ada8c32ad4f

(1178)

on August 24, 2012
at 04:42 PM

I have a half marathon to couch story... stress fracture in my foot from half. No running for 9 months, working on picking it back up... My average pace is about the same as it was, now working on distance.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on August 24, 2012
at 07:01 AM

there must be at least as many...

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on August 24, 2012
at 12:04 AM

+1 for mentioning knee problems. Don't know why so many people into traumatic sport of long distance running. I think humans are rather ambush hunters, like cats.

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8 Answers

4
A97b68379a576dfa764a4828304d2efb

(4181)

on August 23, 2012
at 11:20 PM

I did!

I have never been a runner AT ALL. I started the program and found it very easy to stick to. You build up so gradually that it doesn't cause a lot of soreness, you are excited about your goals and you are more likely to keep with it.

I never ran in an official 5K, but I got to the point of running 4.5 miles without stopping at a respectable pace. I know this isn't very impressive to most people, but it was 3.5 miles more than I had ever run before. I didn't keep up with it, though. My knees were constantly bothering me and I very much so prefer exercises that involve bursts of energy or extremely long walks (over 10 miles). I do want to try it again.

Oh, and I attribute much of my success to a chart I created with a sticker marking each day and level I reached. I really liked those stickers....

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on August 24, 2012
at 12:04 AM

+1 for mentioning knee problems. Don't know why so many people into traumatic sport of long distance running. I think humans are rather ambush hunters, like cats.

2
963322f175cdd4c5f7d52cc372b3a167

on August 24, 2012
at 06:37 AM

What about 5K to couch success stories? How do we know they're not out there too?

58d456f4c4d551a697e65ada8c32ad4f

(1178)

on August 24, 2012
at 04:42 PM

I have a half marathon to couch story... stress fracture in my foot from half. No running for 9 months, working on picking it back up... My average pace is about the same as it was, now working on distance.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on August 24, 2012
at 07:01 AM

there must be at least as many...

2
20bff9cbbddf521bac87b434981502c3

on August 24, 2012
at 12:17 AM

Congratulations for starting the program!

I followed the coolrunning couch to 5k program a few years ago, and went from truly not being able to run for more than 30 seconds, to completing the 5k a few months later. My goal was to run continuously and I was able to do that!

I found the program to be very moderate and balanced in terms of getting me in shape slowly enough but with enough progression that I always felt challenged. And it was a positive experience for me because I was able to observe steady improvement. It was also positive because I lost some fat and looked sexier :)

Use the relative slowness of the program to learn about your body as well. I use running as a time to be more mindful, to improve my form and technique, and to focus on my breathing.

I'm pretty scatterbrained in everyday life, so running is a kind of respite from myself - my mind empties and I'm pure focus.

Good luck!

1
B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on August 24, 2012
at 07:12 AM

Yeah - I caught the diabetes in April 2010, was 310lbs, at which stage couldn't run for even 30 secs.

I used the Nike+ Couch-to-5k plan, which is tough but I followed it to the letter, and ran my first official 5k race in October 2010 in 34 minutes.

Since then I've run 37 5k races (cutting my PB by 5 minutes), two 10k races (the second @ 10min/mile pace), and I've got two half-marathons coming up in September and October.

Best of all I've lost 60lbs and almost completely defeated the diabetes (with the help of low-carbing).

The only tip I can give you is that you need to run slower. Everyone goes too fast to start with, and that makes it hurt too much. Find the pace that you are comfortable with, and then keep pushing up the distance. Your speed will increase by itself.

1
Fc4ef476c4252047249e264d04a5738a

on August 24, 2012
at 05:11 AM

Yes I did it and it works like a charm.... I'm the worst runner in america and I was able to knock off time on 5ks and its super easy to follow. I'm starting again next week to add to my CF workouts to help lose my chub!

0
De9cfdb47ff142453b62bc145e44f9c4

on August 24, 2012
at 03:50 PM

I went from a nearly inanimate object to finishing the Philadelphia Marathon on my hand cycle. Maybe not exactly the same but a proud moment in my life.

0
Aa748fb43334ffd2db3934aa00874bbe

on August 24, 2012
at 03:28 PM

I love C25K. My favorite podcaster is "Chubby Jones," who does an awesome C25K podcast with lots of great music along with the timed intervals. I've kept all of them in iTunes and even use them for running intervals when I'm not using them to get back in shape. They're available on iTunes and here: http://chubbyjones.libsyn.com/

Oh, and I totally agree with other posters here to adjust the C25K program to your own needs. You might not need to start at the very beginning of the program, for example, or you might end up repeating a particular workout a few times until you feel comfortable moving on.

0
A41e6217f488f91dc8a6154a628d06be

on August 24, 2012
at 07:02 AM

I started a couch to 5k programme in April and found it too slow (I already had a good base level of fitness from rowing machine workouts 2 or 3 times a week since January).

I ran/walked 3.2k, 3.2k and 3.4k with 2 day gaps in between each, then ran 4k, 5k and 5k the following week, also with 2 day gaps. I managed to run my first 10k only 3 weeks after starting to run, albeit in a rather slow 59:49.

Since then, I ran my first 10k race at the start of June and my second in July, getting my time down to 51:41. I've signed up for two more 10k races (September and November) and have my first half marathon in October, which I aim to complete in under two hours. This has all been trail running and recently I've been adding hill runs to the mix for training purposes.

The programmes on the Internet for getting from zero to 5k, 10k or marathon distance are great, but you need to tailor them to your own circumstances. The most important thing I've learnt from running this year is to listen to your body.

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