5

votes

The ultimate 'Getting Jacked' hack

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 08, 2012 at 10:07 PM

Hi Hackers,

I want to use this thread to create a base for all ideas on how to get big, strong and jacked.
Fire away!

eg. what to lift, how to train, when to sprint, what to eat and any other hacks that will help turn to average man into a monster.

Note this is leaning down the performance spectrum and not necessarily optimal for long term health.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on March 10, 2012
at 12:30 AM

May you win your World's Best Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Grand Dad as well!

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on March 09, 2012
at 07:40 PM

Read Starting Strength and/or Practical Programming. It _will_ help your form. Regarding a "literal" spotter, find a place to lift that has a power rack. No person needed.

Ec39179d4c06199471827a706adb2896

(242)

on March 09, 2012
at 03:09 AM

Best of luck in being "World's Best Dad". Someday I'll be pushing you for that title!

A5410f987b53c5dc97e8a457c6832ed7

(434)

on March 09, 2012
at 01:19 AM

@Alex... there's always YouTube and the Starting Strength forums. Many people will video themselves and post it to the forum asking for form checks. Or, if your schedule is too busy to support a structured gym-based workout, you could consider a more flexible approach, getting in your workout wherever and whenever you can. That's my current approach and it's working well for me. See my replies to your request for more bodyweight info above...

A5410f987b53c5dc97e8a457c6832ed7

(434)

on March 09, 2012
at 01:13 AM

Current bodyweight training influences and inspirations include Ross Enamait (rosstraining.com), Christopher Sommer (gymnasticbodies.com), Al Kavadlo (alkavadlo.com), Paul Wade (Convict Conditioning I and II), Ido Portal, the Bar-Barians (bar-barians.com) and various others in the street workout/calisthenics movement, Pavel Tsatsouline, and others. I'm still influenced by many others in different disciplines such as Coach Burgener (mikesgym.com), Coach Rip (startingstrength.com), Charles Poliquin, and others...

A5410f987b53c5dc97e8a457c6832ed7

(434)

on March 09, 2012
at 01:08 AM

@Alex, I don't program or track my progress as precisely as I should. My excuse for that is a wife, four kids, and a busy schedule. I workout in a variety of locations (work, home, gym, park, etc). For strength work, I focus on simple calisthenics, gymnastics and some hand balance work... various bodyweight and weighted pullups, pushups, dips, rows, lunges, squats, glute-ham raises, toes to bar, situps, crunches and many others. Also static strength work on rings, paralettes, p-bars and floor. For cardio, I mix up HIIT with walking, the occasional long slow run (4-10 miles) and cycling...

E34fbfa1bca9ae970c9c7313bf9de9f8

(1436)

on March 09, 2012
at 12:50 AM

this. and eat a lot.

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on March 09, 2012
at 12:22 AM

I guess I may have used the word "spotter" too loosely. I didn't necessarily mean someone to help you in the case of needing to bail but rather someone who could help with form and posture to avoid injury.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on March 08, 2012
at 11:55 PM

It tickles me that you have not only created a tag "ronniecoleman" but also you have used it twice! I may have to use it in the future...just because.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on March 08, 2012
at 11:42 PM

Learn to lift without a spotter! Really, the only lift you NEED a spotter for is the bench press, and I think that's a dumb exercise anyway. You often see guys spotting each other on the squat. You want to know what happens if the squatter can't get the weight back up? Two guys get hurt. It takes about 3 minutes to learn how to bail safely on a squat and then neither you nor a spotter get hurt. Everything else is more safely done without a spotter. I haven't had a spotter in years, and feel silly that I ever did. On my heavy days, I ALWAYS work until failure on squats, I'm always bailing.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 08, 2012
at 11:37 PM

Doesn't have a spotter = have a plan. Think ahead about what could go wrong in the lifts your doing and how you would avert disaster. You can lift safely alone, but you gotta use your head. Doing drop sets and pre-exaust can help you get high intensity with a little less risk.

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on March 08, 2012
at 11:25 PM

Care to share the bodyweight regimen? Very interested in what your approach is.

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on March 08, 2012
at 10:49 PM

(EDIT) *Still do

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on March 08, 2012
at 10:48 PM

Been there and have done/still done very much of the above. Great answer.

1bbcd2122d9c75b07440f22ef57d6448

(2934)

on March 08, 2012
at 10:26 PM

You stole my answer, and used such nice formatting, too!

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3 Answers

11
A5410f987b53c5dc97e8a457c6832ed7

(434)

on March 08, 2012
at 10:25 PM

If I were to prescribe a 'getting jacked' regimen to build lean body mass as fast as possible, I'd start with a simple lifting program based around multi-joint barbell movements. A good place to start is following the Starting Strength program as outlined in the excellent books by Mark Rippetoe. Combine that with a paleo-ish diet with a caloric surplus, and you will grow.

That general prescription is based around the following lifts

  • squat
  • deadlift
  • power clean
  • bench press
  • overhead press

Common assistance work would include

  • pull-ups / chin-ups
  • dips
  • glute-ham raises
  • roman chair sit-ups

You would lift 3x per week, possibly adding one high intensity interval training workout or other cardio. But, you will want to limit other activity to allow for proper recovery.

I've been down that road in the past and it definitely works... though at this point I prefer a regimen based around bodyweight exercises.

1bbcd2122d9c75b07440f22ef57d6448

(2934)

on March 08, 2012
at 10:26 PM

You stole my answer, and used such nice formatting, too!

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on March 08, 2012
at 11:25 PM

Care to share the bodyweight regimen? Very interested in what your approach is.

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on March 08, 2012
at 10:49 PM

(EDIT) *Still do

A5410f987b53c5dc97e8a457c6832ed7

(434)

on March 09, 2012
at 01:13 AM

Current bodyweight training influences and inspirations include Ross Enamait (rosstraining.com), Christopher Sommer (gymnasticbodies.com), Al Kavadlo (alkavadlo.com), Paul Wade (Convict Conditioning I and II), Ido Portal, the Bar-Barians (bar-barians.com) and various others in the street workout/calisthenics movement, Pavel Tsatsouline, and others. I'm still influenced by many others in different disciplines such as Coach Burgener (mikesgym.com), Coach Rip (startingstrength.com), Charles Poliquin, and others...

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on March 08, 2012
at 10:48 PM

Been there and have done/still done very much of the above. Great answer.

E34fbfa1bca9ae970c9c7313bf9de9f8

(1436)

on March 09, 2012
at 12:50 AM

this. and eat a lot.

A5410f987b53c5dc97e8a457c6832ed7

(434)

on March 09, 2012
at 01:08 AM

@Alex, I don't program or track my progress as precisely as I should. My excuse for that is a wife, four kids, and a busy schedule. I workout in a variety of locations (work, home, gym, park, etc). For strength work, I focus on simple calisthenics, gymnastics and some hand balance work... various bodyweight and weighted pullups, pushups, dips, rows, lunges, squats, glute-ham raises, toes to bar, situps, crunches and many others. Also static strength work on rings, paralettes, p-bars and floor. For cardio, I mix up HIIT with walking, the occasional long slow run (4-10 miles) and cycling...

5
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on March 09, 2012
at 01:59 AM

I've been there, I've done that, and from what my limited experience is.

One - Train the core 3 - squat, deadlift, press (standing preferred in my opinion, but if you like to lay down and lift weights, go for it). Train the squat and deadlift once per week, and the press twice. I preferred sets of 8 on squats for growth, no more than triples in the deadlift (too easy to lose form and get hurt), and sets of twelve on the press. Instead of doing supplemental work (rows, chins, and dips are the only ones worth a crap anyway), do variations on the above lifts for specific strength imbalances or "vanity muscles" - for example my traps got huge by doing very wide grip deadlifts (snatch-grip deads), when I started lagging in quad strength for my squats, I started using a safety squat bar and front squats, when my lockouts were poor on the standing press, I used close-gripped bench pressing to bring them up.

Two - Eat like it's your last meal, 3-4 times a day. I know some guys that get in 8k calories a day. At one time I was eating 400gm of protein a day - from eating 4 meals at 1k cal each, plus 3 high calorie shakes per day that were 500 cal each. Meals were all low-carb but the shakes were usually Muscle Milk with two tablespoons of corn starch or rice flour added for the raw carbs.

Three - Sleep like a baby breastfeeding off a morphine addict. My best results were when I was in school, I would get up, do my conditioning work, go to class, take a nap, and then go back to the gym for my strength work. All-in-all I think I was getting 12hr/day of sleep.

That's pretty much it. Everything you ever needed to know about gaining fast, is basically watching babies, who double in bodyweight every month... "play" a lot, eat a lot, and sleep a lot. That's it. And without drugs, it is the fastest way to big strength and muscle gains.

Keep in mind I no longer train like this. I "play" with infrequent olympic lifting and plyometrics, as well as throw rocks and weights in a field (highland games). I sleep a very deep and comfortable 7 hours a night, and eat almost exactly 2000 calories per day with about 120gm of protein. But my new goal is not to "beat my genetics" and win World's Strongest Man... it's to beat my genetics and not die at 54 like my dad, so I can be World's Best Dad.

Ec39179d4c06199471827a706adb2896

(242)

on March 09, 2012
at 03:09 AM

Best of luck in being "World's Best Dad". Someday I'll be pushing you for that title!

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on March 10, 2012
at 12:30 AM

May you win your World's Best Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Grand Dad as well!

0
91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on March 08, 2012
at 11:22 PM

This question always comes up and Starting Strength is always the recommendation, but what would be a good way of building muscle for someone who spends over 12 hours a day working/studying and doesn't have a spotter?

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 08, 2012
at 11:37 PM

Doesn't have a spotter = have a plan. Think ahead about what could go wrong in the lifts your doing and how you would avert disaster. You can lift safely alone, but you gotta use your head. Doing drop sets and pre-exaust can help you get high intensity with a little less risk.

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on March 09, 2012
at 07:40 PM

Read Starting Strength and/or Practical Programming. It _will_ help your form. Regarding a "literal" spotter, find a place to lift that has a power rack. No person needed.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on March 08, 2012
at 11:42 PM

Learn to lift without a spotter! Really, the only lift you NEED a spotter for is the bench press, and I think that's a dumb exercise anyway. You often see guys spotting each other on the squat. You want to know what happens if the squatter can't get the weight back up? Two guys get hurt. It takes about 3 minutes to learn how to bail safely on a squat and then neither you nor a spotter get hurt. Everything else is more safely done without a spotter. I haven't had a spotter in years, and feel silly that I ever did. On my heavy days, I ALWAYS work until failure on squats, I'm always bailing.

A5410f987b53c5dc97e8a457c6832ed7

(434)

on March 09, 2012
at 01:19 AM

@Alex... there's always YouTube and the Starting Strength forums. Many people will video themselves and post it to the forum asking for form checks. Or, if your schedule is too busy to support a structured gym-based workout, you could consider a more flexible approach, getting in your workout wherever and whenever you can. That's my current approach and it's working well for me. See my replies to your request for more bodyweight info above...

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on March 09, 2012
at 12:22 AM

I guess I may have used the word "spotter" too loosely. I didn't necessarily mean someone to help you in the case of needing to bail but rather someone who could help with form and posture to avoid injury.

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