5

votes

Rice Syrup as an acceptable sweetener?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 03, 2011 at 6:03 PM

I suppose we don't know if cave dwelling peoples boiled brown rice with fire back in the day, but let's assume they did not. In 2011, our world is bombarded with a barrage of sweeteners, and we all know that most do not promote healthy metabollic functioning if over consumed.

The Jaminet's from Perfect Health Diet have been praising Rice Syrups as an acceptable sweetener due to the fact that it contains virtually zero fructose and is comprised mostly of glucose sugars.

Seems to me that ingesting rice syrup wouldn't be much different than ingesting rice itself, and it may actually be beneficial for bodybuilders looking for a post workout glycogen replenishment to pack on muscle bulk.

What do you PaleoHackers think of brown rice syrups? How about white rice syrups?

790ee3f9605d385a3020a264a6a481c7

(0)

on December 05, 2013
at 12:39 AM

Unnatural. For 2.6my we were on a keto-adapted state most of the time to survive the extreme conditions in the Quaternary Ice Age (It's only been "calmer" the last 10% of the whole). I don't know how well bodybuilding works while keto-adapted but it is worth exploring as it seems athletic performance is highly enhanced (access to 40,000 calories of energy in keto vs 2,000 calories in stores of glucose and glycogen on the farmer diet see Volek/Finney Athete book). Insulin is a growth hormone not worth tapping into regularly IMO. However, it was important when we came across honey.

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:40 AM

"Sugar is sugar is sugar"... Bullshit

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 04, 2011
at 01:57 PM

Great comprehensive answer.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 04, 2011
at 11:07 AM

Urgh that's a shame, I hate honey, it actually makes me gag. Luckily I don't feel the need to sweeten most things.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 04, 2011
at 11:06 AM

Sugar is not sugar? So what are those list of sugars then if they are not sugars? Wikipedia says...... "Sugar" can also be used to refer to water-soluble crystalline carbohydrates with varying sweetness. Sugars include monosaccharides (e.g., glucose, fructose, galactose), disaccharides (e.g., sucrose, lactose, maltose), trisaccharides, and oligosaccharides,[26] in contrast to complex carbohydrates such as polysaccharides. Corn syrup, dextrose, crystalline fructose, and maltose, for example, are used in manufacturing and preparing food.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on March 04, 2011
at 01:21 AM

Pretty uniformed advice there....

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 03, 2011
at 11:31 PM

i love raw honey. the honey fructose does not appear to have the same negative impacts as other fructose sugars. i look at almost everything CMast puts out there.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on March 03, 2011
at 11:19 PM

Sugar is not sugar. Glucose is not fructose is not sucrose is not galactose. I do agree it should be limited though.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 03, 2011
at 08:27 PM

honey is honestly the most promising sweetener. Look at Chris Masterjohn's posts on the subject.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 03, 2011
at 08:24 PM

I like you first paragraph, not your second! Haha. j/k man. Selective appreciation. lol. You're spot on with those who have recovered, and glucose vs unbound fructose. personally though, i am ok with some choice sweets, and compared to what i used to eat without even flinching, stuff like 'rice syrup' and 'soaked oats' and 'dark chocolate' still sound hilarious to me. it wasn't too long ago that i wouldn't have given those items a second thought, but bcuz i cut out all the garbage, things that never used to sound appealing to me are suddenly 'treats', like a small banana with almond butter.

F4aff43df6a8a49a1c3879c1233ee560

(459)

on March 03, 2011
at 08:01 PM

Great response. Especially the warning to people with compromised metabolisms. They need to keep in mind that glucose isn't as sweet as sucrose. If they 'sweeten to taste', they might be consuming signifacantly more than they realize. I've been using dextrose (left over from homebrewing) and it really is a lot less sweet.

Af2ad65226384cedd4f5f08825a75b5d

(665)

on March 03, 2011
at 07:48 PM

I know sugar is sugar, but different sugars (fructose and glucose, mainly) are processed differently by the body and produce different effects in the body. The answer neglects the possibility that a glucose syrup is a superior for health for those limited "treats".

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5 Answers

best answer

11
Af2ad65226384cedd4f5f08825a75b5d

(665)

on March 03, 2011
at 06:43 PM

It's important to note for those who do not know, the body processes glucose and fructose differently. Here's a great lecture on that subject, describing how dangerous excessive fructose consumption could potentially be.

In my mind, brown or white rice syrup equally stand as the top sweetner for those that wish to use a sweetner. Obviously they are not paleo nor are they necessary, but I think they are the least problematic sweetner since it is basically a dextrose syrup. Dextrose is just glucose-glucose disaccharides. From what I understand, the rice used to make rice syrup is not GMO which is why I've seen an argument preferring rice syrup to plain corn syrup, which also was a dextrose syrup but is made mostly from GMO Corn. I think it is important to view sweetners as something to be consumed in extremely limited quantities as too much of anything sweet should still trigger the chemical reward pathways related to sweet tastes, which operate similar to the heroin reward response in the body (as discussed in David Kessler's great book "The End of Overeating"). In addition for people with comprimised metabolisms or diabetes, you'd want them to stay miles away from a glucose syrup. For those with healthy metabolisms and who need a sweet fix occasionally in my mind it would definitely be preferable to pretty much all other sweetners which usually have nearly half fructose at minimum: regular sugar (sucrose - glucose-fructose dissaccharide), honey (about 50.5 percent fructose), maple syrup (95 percent sucrose, 1 percent fructose, and 3 percent glucose), or agave nectar (aka hippie high fructose corn syrup - produced the same way and higher fructose than HFCS).

F4aff43df6a8a49a1c3879c1233ee560

(459)

on March 03, 2011
at 08:01 PM

Great response. Especially the warning to people with compromised metabolisms. They need to keep in mind that glucose isn't as sweet as sucrose. If they 'sweeten to taste', they might be consuming signifacantly more than they realize. I've been using dextrose (left over from homebrewing) and it really is a lot less sweet.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 04, 2011
at 01:57 PM

Great comprehensive answer.

1
Medium avatar

on March 03, 2011
at 08:08 PM

I would say that after people have endured some period of time where they have increased their insulin sensitivities, lost weight and in general recovered from the great toll taken by the SAD, a sweetener consisting of pure glucose from a grain is a far preferable route than anything "more natural" that contains large amounts of (often unbound) fructose.

That being said, I think an even better route is to never reintroduce sweets and thus never become tempted to eat them again. I'm currently eating a diet that contains nothing sweet and I find it to be quite liberating.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 03, 2011
at 08:24 PM

I like you first paragraph, not your second! Haha. j/k man. Selective appreciation. lol. You're spot on with those who have recovered, and glucose vs unbound fructose. personally though, i am ok with some choice sweets, and compared to what i used to eat without even flinching, stuff like 'rice syrup' and 'soaked oats' and 'dark chocolate' still sound hilarious to me. it wasn't too long ago that i wouldn't have given those items a second thought, but bcuz i cut out all the garbage, things that never used to sound appealing to me are suddenly 'treats', like a small banana with almond butter.

1
2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 03, 2011
at 07:03 PM

Sugar is sugar is sugar is sugar and should be limited to "treats" in my opinion.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on March 03, 2011
at 11:19 PM

Sugar is not sugar. Glucose is not fructose is not sucrose is not galactose. I do agree it should be limited though.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on March 04, 2011
at 01:21 AM

Pretty uniformed advice there....

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 04, 2011
at 11:06 AM

Sugar is not sugar? So what are those list of sugars then if they are not sugars? Wikipedia says...... "Sugar" can also be used to refer to water-soluble crystalline carbohydrates with varying sweetness. Sugars include monosaccharides (e.g., glucose, fructose, galactose), disaccharides (e.g., sucrose, lactose, maltose), trisaccharides, and oligosaccharides,[26] in contrast to complex carbohydrates such as polysaccharides. Corn syrup, dextrose, crystalline fructose, and maltose, for example, are used in manufacturing and preparing food.

Af2ad65226384cedd4f5f08825a75b5d

(665)

on March 03, 2011
at 07:48 PM

I know sugar is sugar, but different sugars (fructose and glucose, mainly) are processed differently by the body and produce different effects in the body. The answer neglects the possibility that a glucose syrup is a superior for health for those limited "treats".

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on September 03, 2013
at 12:40 AM

"Sugar is sugar is sugar"... Bullshit

0
Medium avatar

on April 07, 2014
at 04:12 AM

I've been searching out cleaner sugar alternatives to bake with for my carb nites. So far, the best I've found are dextrose powder as a sugar substitute and brown rice syrup for honey. Dextrose syrup and white rice syrup seem hard to find in the US.

0
D9ac0fc62e418f909696d835f60f6c7c

on September 02, 2013
at 06:55 PM

Based on some of the replies many are clearly not comprehending the concept of Fructose metabolism so maybe put in a few clear bullets points about that on this pages. In a nutshell folks for our purposes ; Fructose converts to triglycerides NOT Glucose.....

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