1

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Would you eat Sous Vide prepared meat or fish?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 15, 2011 at 7:15 PM

I am trying to study to be a cook. And i wonder would you consider sous vide paleo? I have been using it to cook my fish and some hanger steaks. There are some concerns with chemicals leaching from plastic. The bags i use are rated safe at 120C. And there are even some bags that are lined with metal to stop molecules and oxidations. But these are rarely used in restaurants, due to cost.

There are disadvantages, but i think advantages outweight them, since the fish and meat are always cooked at very low optimum temps (42-55C), and under vacuum. So there isnt so much oxidation i think, especially with fatty fish. Fish cant take as much pressure so its not vacuumed as hard as meat. But it takes only 15mins to cook anyway.

I am old school guy but i really prefer sous vide cooked salmon, its just so moist and tastes like salmon and nothing else.

Eggs can be ofcourse cooked without bag and there is no risk then. End result is egg that has been cooked perfectly just the way you like it.

99a6e964584f20f3f69ad3a70a335353

(1334)

on September 17, 2011
at 06:54 PM

I can understand being a bit worried about contamination, but I'll say this: I work with BSL-2 pathogens, including using water baths to thaw samples. I would be absolutely willing to take a unit from work, empty it, clean it with a dilute bleach solution, then soap and water, and then eat a meal directly out of it. Put the food in vacuum-sealed plastic and I'd be even less worried. Take that how you will.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on September 16, 2011
at 02:33 PM

Well, I'm leery of the used lab versions, but have considered getting going the timer/rice cooker route. And Jan, it's kinda both. My understanding is that it is difficult to get the temperature precision without a gadget.

99a6e964584f20f3f69ad3a70a335353

(1334)

on September 16, 2011
at 12:13 PM

You don't need one of the fancy $$$ kitchen units, a used laboratory water bath for $100 or less off ebay will do (if you clean it well, contamination isn't an issue), or MAKE magazine had instructions on how to make your own in the range of $70 if you're handy with a soldering iron or know somebody who is.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 15, 2011
at 09:10 PM

I always forget to preheat it.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on September 15, 2011
at 08:43 PM

I usually preheat the jar :)

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 15, 2011
at 08:12 PM

Yes i have done scrambled eggs in glass jar takes little longer to heat than a bag but makes damn good scrambled eggs. :)

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 15, 2011
at 08:00 PM

Well its more a technic than a gadged. Differents results, like searing and sauteing etc.

11838116de44ae449df0563f09bd3d73

(655)

on September 15, 2011
at 07:51 PM

Just more consumerism. I don't need more stuff.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on September 15, 2011
at 07:27 PM

I like sous vide - I rigged up one using a cooler and it was awesome. It's not going to be your main "go to" for food all the time, if you were wanting to eat sous vide daily I would say no way, but since you're not? Totally play with it.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 15, 2011
at 07:26 PM

Yep, i am not totally sold for it cooking meat. But i think its way better for fish. Since the delicate fat. Confit can be done in glass jar too, so theres no problems with chemicals. I guess you could confit the salmon that way too, in coconut milk or whatever, but i havent tried that one yet.

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5 Answers

3
1368bb49d7a1455a3c477aea04363b03

(169)

on September 15, 2011
at 07:21 PM

I'm not a fan of the idea. Paleo aside, it's the same 'risks' as you mention. Plastic leaching doesn't appeal to me.

I have seen confit recipes which definitely take advantage of this though, as you can limit the amount of fat per bag while still getting the required effect. Added to the fact that it's already vacuum sealed and no other step is necessary before freezing/storing the end product.

sidenote: it seems to be a bit of a 'fad' at the moment as every "foodie" is talking about IT, and making your own DIY variations. I've personally not tried it yet.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 15, 2011
at 07:26 PM

Yep, i am not totally sold for it cooking meat. But i think its way better for fish. Since the delicate fat. Confit can be done in glass jar too, so theres no problems with chemicals. I guess you could confit the salmon that way too, in coconut milk or whatever, but i havent tried that one yet.

2
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 16, 2011
at 12:33 PM

I'm a bit concerned about the plastic and have asked the kracken about it. He is not a fan either.

2
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on September 15, 2011
at 07:43 PM

I love it as a technique. I have seen it done using canning jars as well if you are worried about plastic, you just need more marinade

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on September 15, 2011
at 08:43 PM

I usually preheat the jar :)

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 15, 2011
at 08:12 PM

Yes i have done scrambled eggs in glass jar takes little longer to heat than a bag but makes damn good scrambled eggs. :)

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 15, 2011
at 09:10 PM

I always forget to preheat it.

1
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 16, 2011
at 08:46 AM

I guess i will be using sous vide if i ever open some restaurant (highly doubtful). You can cook the meat in glass or metal containers anyways and there is no leeching of anything.

And it also gives customer to have the option to have cooked meat but without searing. Searing ofcourse gives most of the flavor for meat but if you like to eat optimal ;) Its easily finished on a coal grill or smoked for a better taste.

1
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on September 15, 2011
at 07:51 PM

I wouldn't consider it paleo, but I'd definitely eat food cooked that way (a pretty good chance if you eat an any decent restaurant). But sorry Dr. Eades, I'm not ready to plunk down the dough for a home version!

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 15, 2011
at 08:00 PM

Well its more a technic than a gadged. Differents results, like searing and sauteing etc.

99a6e964584f20f3f69ad3a70a335353

(1334)

on September 16, 2011
at 12:13 PM

You don't need one of the fancy $$$ kitchen units, a used laboratory water bath for $100 or less off ebay will do (if you clean it well, contamination isn't an issue), or MAKE magazine had instructions on how to make your own in the range of $70 if you're handy with a soldering iron or know somebody who is.

99a6e964584f20f3f69ad3a70a335353

(1334)

on September 17, 2011
at 06:54 PM

I can understand being a bit worried about contamination, but I'll say this: I work with BSL-2 pathogens, including using water baths to thaw samples. I would be absolutely willing to take a unit from work, empty it, clean it with a dilute bleach solution, then soap and water, and then eat a meal directly out of it. Put the food in vacuum-sealed plastic and I'd be even less worried. Take that how you will.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on September 16, 2011
at 02:33 PM

Well, I'm leery of the used lab versions, but have considered getting going the timer/rice cooker route. And Jan, it's kinda both. My understanding is that it is difficult to get the temperature precision without a gadget.

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