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What do you know about resistant starch? And how to add more to our paleo/primal diet?

Commented on June 25, 2014
Created June 19, 2014 at 7:03 PM

Resistant Starch

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on June 25, 2014
at 01:39 AM

Depends. IF they are organic and there's no green under the skin I leave it. If nothing else you may get some nice soil based organisms (though they are probably cooked off). But probably not a good idea to eat ANY conventional potatoes--lots of pesticides. So if you must, peel.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on June 24, 2014
at 06:14 AM

Thank you! One more question about potatoes: to peel or not to peel? What would you recommend?

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on June 22, 2014
at 06:56 AM

Somewhere on the FTA site there's a chart of resistant starches, but i don't think buckwheat and oatmeal have much RS, especially not oatmeal. They suggest cooling rice and potatoes overnight in the fridge. I make a big batch of rice and freeze it in serving sized portions. It can be gently warmed (ideally less than 130 degrees) quickly when I want some rice. I also heard that plain mochi has a lot of RS (not the frozen ice cream, but the refrigerated block of mochi found near the tofu). It's kind of fun--toast it and let it cool before eating. It puffs up!

Medium avatar

(3213)

on June 22, 2014
at 04:45 AM

Thank you, great answer

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on June 21, 2014
at 08:26 AM

Thank you for a very detailed answer. What if I cooked and cooled buckwheat groats? Or cooked and cooled oatmeal? Would it work? How long should be the cooling period for both rice and potatoes? Will a couple hours do the trick or I would have to freeze them? Thanks!

Medium avatar

(3213)

on June 21, 2014
at 05:51 AM

Thank you for your time, GREAT answer

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on June 19, 2014
at 08:13 PM

Can also just buy potato starch and consume straight up.

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3 Answers

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3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on June 20, 2014
at 10:16 PM

Mark Sisson, Chris Kresser, and Dave Asprey have all written very thoughtful analyses of resistant starches. Or you could read the primary source which right now is Nickoley's blog, but with his blog you have to wade through a bunch of extraneous ranting to find the useful information.

Here's my understanding:

Resistant starch is a form of fiber which is not digested in the upper GI system. It gets metabolized in the large intestine by the gut bacteria, and the end product is not sugar, it is beneficial saturated fatty acids like Butyric acid. Because it's not broken down into simple sugars, there should be little or no impact on your blood glucose and insulin levels, and it should not interfere with dietary ketosis--if that's your way of eating. In fact, consuming resistant starch will have what is known as a "second meal" effect, keeping your postprandial blood sugar lower for several hours after ingesting.

Resistant starches come from cooked and cooled white rice, potatoes, tapioca, taro, green plaintain, raw unmodified potato starch, and inulin containing vegetables like Jerusalem Artichokes (aka sunchokes). The ideal dose of resistant starch is about 40 g/day, but start slowly as there may be a lot of bloating and gas at first. Spread the doses throughout the day.

Resistant starch should be consumed with probiotics, preferably soil based probiotics. The resistant starch seems to give the beneficial bacteria a "free ride" to the large intestine to help feed and populate the beneficial gut bacteria. This can help with regularity, sleep, blood sugar regulation, and general health.

Be aware that raw unmodified potato starch is pretty much pure resistant starch, but cooked and cooled rice and potatoes and other "safe starches" contain only a percentage of resistant starch--there is regular starch which gets broken down to sugars, too. If you are very sensitive to starches and have poor blood glucose regulation, you may not do very well with so-called "safe starches". Use a blood glucose meter to watch carefully for how your own body reacts.

I've been adding more resistant starch to my primal diet by taking some of the unmodified raw starch in probiotic liquids (kombucha), and mixing it in to cold foods. I'm eating a few servings of cooked and cooled rice each week (I make up a bunch in my Instant pot, and then freeze in portion sizes to help me control amounts). I occasionally eat cooked and cooled potatoes--enjoyed a yummy potato salad with homemade mayo last weekend!

I am insulin resistant (PCOS) and watch my carbs carefully. My blood sugar has not reacted negatively to the resistant starches, and I remain in ketosis even after eating rice. When I slipped up and ate freshly prepared rice (not retrograded) my blood sugar shot up accordingly. Resistant starches do not seem to be affecting my weight at all.

I'm thrilled to be able to include these safe starches--properly retrograded as necessary--back into my diet--rice, rice noodles and wrappers, some potatoes. It tastes so good!

Medium avatar

(3213)

on June 21, 2014
at 05:51 AM

Thank you for your time, GREAT answer

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on June 21, 2014
at 08:26 AM

Thank you for a very detailed answer. What if I cooked and cooled buckwheat groats? Or cooked and cooled oatmeal? Would it work? How long should be the cooling period for both rice and potatoes? Will a couple hours do the trick or I would have to freeze them? Thanks!

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on June 22, 2014
at 06:56 AM

Somewhere on the FTA site there's a chart of resistant starches, but i don't think buckwheat and oatmeal have much RS, especially not oatmeal. They suggest cooling rice and potatoes overnight in the fridge. I make a big batch of rice and freeze it in serving sized portions. It can be gently warmed (ideally less than 130 degrees) quickly when I want some rice. I also heard that plain mochi has a lot of RS (not the frozen ice cream, but the refrigerated block of mochi found near the tofu). It's kind of fun--toast it and let it cool before eating. It puffs up!

0
5c8849f93f97a042f246bfa3534f93c7

on June 22, 2014
at 12:06 AM

I eat 2 green bananas a day for my 30g dosage of resistant starch (they need to be really green or it won't work). They have a strong glue-like substance that you need to watch out for when peeling. Well, since it's entirely natural, I would say it's a pretty good choice for paleo. There's supposedly no real glycemic impact either, so you can treat it as 0 carb if you're trying to save on carbs to lose weight. You can keep them green if you store it inside the freezer for about 5 days too.

I myself eat them crushed with heavy cream, and sweetener which I still haven't quite been able to remove from my diet yet. It's really good. Even better with honey, if you can spare the carbs. Do note that you can't use any kind of heat at all when making them or you'll most of the resistant starch, but you'll also gain the full carbs of a regular banana as well. Ah, and the same thing will happen if it stops being green, of course.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on June 22, 2014
at 04:45 AM

Thank you, great answer

0
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 19, 2014
at 07:11 PM

I hear that cooled cooked potatoes are an excellent source of resistant starch. I've read it's good but haven't had any noticable positive benefits that I'm aware of from natural food sources of resistant starch.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on June 19, 2014
at 08:13 PM

Can also just buy potato starch and consume straight up.

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