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Primer on Resistant Starch & Paleo

Commented on September 23, 2013
Created September 22, 2013 at 4:04 PM

I am looking to do some research on resistant starch and how and if it should be integrated into a Paleo lifestyle

Can anyone point me to the best place to start my research?

Medium avatar

(10601)

on September 23, 2013
at 08:25 PM

Some rice preparations may be resistant but Japanese sticky rice is not one of them. Sushi and rice bowls used to play havoc with my blood sugar.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on September 23, 2013
at 08:22 PM

That's what I ran into for a definition too. RS is related to digestibility rather than any chemical characteristics of the starch.

Last night I drank a tablespoon of uncooked cornstarch dispersed in cold water and slept better. This would be similar to an RS2, except that it's a refined product. I'll look for some of the Bob's Red Mill potato version.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on September 22, 2013
at 05:23 PM

Uncooked potato starch is a good example of a raw starch. If you cook it in water to the point of thickening the resistance to digestion is lost.

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5 Answers

0
3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on September 23, 2013
at 12:04 AM

Resistant starches are similar in function to soluble fiber, which is a good thing around here. They are good sources of pre-biotics and seem to have some similar health benefits as soluble fiber.

The basic idea is that these are starches that are complex enough that the body doesn't break them down before they hit the gut. The friendly bacteria, however, have a good time with them.

The breakdown of the types of resistant starches is as follows (from Wikipedia):

  • RS1 Physically inaccessible or digestible resistant starch, such as that found in seeds or legumes and unprocessed whole grains
  • RS2 Resistant starch that occurs in its natural granular form, such as uncooked potato, green banana flour.
  • RS3 Resistant starch that is formed when starch-containing foods are cooked and cooled such as in legumes, bread, cornflakes and cooked-and-chilled potatoes, pasta salad or sushi rice . The process of cooking out the starch and cooling it is called retrogradation.
  • RS4 Starches that have been chemically modified to resist digestion. This type of resistant starches can have a wide variety of structures and are not found in nature. (note: probably not paleo)

It seems like a lot of carbs that we might be wary of (rice, potatoes) forms these starches when cooled after cooking. I don't know if we need to go out of our way to incorporate these and the sources may or may not be accompanies with more easily processed carbs which could be not as good for blood sugar. The jury is out on some of these things, but I think if you stick with the natural ingredients and properly prepare questionable items (soak the beans) they seem like a positive thing, or at least mostly neutral.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on September 23, 2013
at 08:22 PM

That's what I ran into for a definition too. RS is related to digestibility rather than any chemical characteristics of the starch.

Last night I drank a tablespoon of uncooked cornstarch dispersed in cold water and slept better. This would be similar to an RS2, except that it's a refined product. I'll look for some of the Bob's Red Mill potato version.

0
Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

on September 22, 2013
at 10:35 PM

@thhq. yes...the conclusion on FtA was to use Bob's Red Mill unmodified potato starch mixed in water. It's tasteless and easy to toss down.

0
Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

on September 22, 2013
at 05:19 PM

Go to Free the Animal...he has many recent entries on a resistant starch hack that he and other have worked out and there is a ton of feedback from people who have tried it. I have been doing 2 T of potato starch at night before bed and have had very sound sleep (this is something reported by those on his site as a side effect). People report all kinds of benefits, but I mainly notice good sleep and the ability to go longer without feeling hungry.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on September 22, 2013
at 05:23 PM

Uncooked potato starch is a good example of a raw starch. If you cook it in water to the point of thickening the resistance to digestion is lost.

0
Medium avatar

(10601)

on September 22, 2013
at 05:18 PM

I spent a little time Googling this subject recently. I couldn't find a good chemical definition of resistant starch, and it appears that it comes from empirical observation of what makes starch indigestible. To greymouser's list, add eating starch raw or undercooked. Cooking releases the starch molecules from the plant cells that hold them, making them easier to digest.

0
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on September 22, 2013
at 04:52 PM

If you are getting resistant starch from food, it's paleo. If you are eating spoonfuls of resistant corn starch as a dietary supplement, that's your prerogative, but not quite paleo at all. Simple and paleo sources of resistant starch include bananas, plantains, sweet potatoes, and potatoes. Really, any tuber is likely to provide plenty of RS. You can increase the RS by letting the food cool fully after cooking, or eating bananas and plantains while still a bit green. If you PHD and not strict paleo, then including rice is also an option.

I would start your research by simply finding an exhaustive list of foods that contain RS before or after cooking.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on September 23, 2013
at 08:25 PM

Some rice preparations may be resistant but Japanese sticky rice is not one of them. Sushi and rice bowls used to play havoc with my blood sugar.

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