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Do lemons really have more vitamin-C than limes?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 24, 2013 at 9:49 PM

nutritiondata.com indicates that lemons have 50% more vitamin-C than limes. I have a hard time believing that, but what do you think?

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 29, 2013
at 01:20 AM

Thanks mathgirl, your comments are always so enlightening! Where would this forum be without you?

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 25, 2013
at 02:56 AM

Bioavailability is not the same as "your absorption". If the vitamin is there, but in a form that your body can't digest, then it doesn't really count towards fulfilling your needs. Nutritional databases don't generally take bioavailability into account.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on January 25, 2013
at 02:51 AM

It still doesn't matter how much something has if its in a from that your body can't use. Say food a has 10 units of vit c and you can use it all but food be has 10,000 units, however it's bound up in the food and it never gets absorbed by your body. The nutritional database would still report that the latter had more and people will probably flock to it. But eating the former will actually be better for you.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on January 25, 2013
at 12:24 AM

You brought up the conspiracy theory yourself with your comment by suggesting researchers have skewed the results in favor of lemons and oranges. I only bash those too lazy to do their own research. If you don't like what nutritiondata.com has, find another database. There are many which you can find through a simple web search.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 24, 2013
at 10:46 PM

One has little to no control over what the body ultimately absorbs; one does however have control over the food one consumes.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 24, 2013
at 10:46 PM

One has little to no control over what the body absorbs; one does however have control over the food one consumes.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 24, 2013
at 10:43 PM

I just realized how absolutely ridiculous you sound: IT DOESN'T MATTER HOW MUCH NUTRITION A FOOD CONTAINS AS LONG AS YOUR ABSORPTION IS GOOD!? Sir, if a food contains nothing, then you absorb nothing.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 24, 2013
at 10:31 PM

concerning your number two: both questions are important, so I can't see what youre getting on about.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 24, 2013
at 10:22 PM

Do you believe everything you read? Do you often attack those who think for themselves and ask questions? I want only the truth so I might live a better life. For me, it's not about uncovering conspiracies, its about gaining knowledge.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on January 24, 2013
at 10:14 PM

Right...because conspiracy lurks behind every nutritional profile.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 24, 2013
at 10:11 PM

And according to research, oranges have still more vitamin C than lemons! It is not a question borne of logic. It is only a gut feeling. I propose that researchers have skewed the results in favor of lemons and oranges.

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4 Answers

3
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on January 24, 2013
at 09:54 PM

Question #1: why would you think otherwise. I.e. what expectation do you have that's bothering you?

And #2: how much of any kind of nutrient a food had isn't the question to should ask. You should be concerned with how bioavailability the nutrient is when you eat it. Nutrition databases don't have that. It's a much harder question to answer.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 24, 2013
at 10:31 PM

concerning your number two: both questions are important, so I can't see what youre getting on about.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 25, 2013
at 02:56 AM

Bioavailability is not the same as "your absorption". If the vitamin is there, but in a form that your body can't digest, then it doesn't really count towards fulfilling your needs. Nutritional databases don't generally take bioavailability into account.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 24, 2013
at 10:46 PM

One has little to no control over what the body absorbs; one does however have control over the food one consumes.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 24, 2013
at 10:43 PM

I just realized how absolutely ridiculous you sound: IT DOESN'T MATTER HOW MUCH NUTRITION A FOOD CONTAINS AS LONG AS YOUR ABSORPTION IS GOOD!? Sir, if a food contains nothing, then you absorb nothing.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on January 24, 2013
at 10:46 PM

One has little to no control over what the body ultimately absorbs; one does however have control over the food one consumes.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on January 25, 2013
at 02:51 AM

It still doesn't matter how much something has if its in a from that your body can't use. Say food a has 10 units of vit c and you can use it all but food be has 10,000 units, however it's bound up in the food and it never gets absorbed by your body. The nutritional database would still report that the latter had more and people will probably flock to it. But eating the former will actually be better for you.

2
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on January 25, 2013
at 02:19 AM

242g of lime juice has 72.6mg of vit C, .3mg of vit C per g of juice. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1943/2

244g of lemon juice has 112mg of vit C, .459mg of vit C per g of juice. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1938/2

Another database shows 244g of lemon juice has 94.4mg of vit C, .387mg per g of juice. http://nutridb.org/view_food?food=09152&weight=1&quantity=0&action=getFood

Lime juice is 72.6mg of vit C in 242g, .3mg per g of juice. http://nutridb.org/view_food?food=09160&weight=1&quantity=0&action=getFood

There are differences between databases, but minute ones.

2
43f469552cfd3be73fc88a9821b14986

on January 24, 2013
at 09:53 PM

100g Lemon juice has 77g Vitamin C: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1938/2

100g Lime juice has only 30g Vitamin C: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1943/2

It is true

1
Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

on January 25, 2013
at 01:45 AM

I did not know that, but I just see it as a reason to eat more limes. I like limes better than lemons.

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