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Bio-identical nano tech toothpaste shown to be superior at preventing caries, remineralizing, whitening, treating hypersenitivity and treating periodontal disease?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 03, 2013 at 1:05 PM

Hydroxyapatite constitutes much of the material your bones are made of. Below are some clinical studies observing the effects of a nano-hydroxyapatite toothpaste's effects on teeth.

It turns out that toothpastes using hydroxyapatite as the active ingredient are being shown to be significantly more effective than fluoride based toothpastes and dentifrices for:

  1. Preventing caries
  2. Treating hypersensitivity
  3. Curing periodontal diseases
  4. Whitening teeth
  5. Remineralization of caries (in vitro)

There's also some promising research using hydroxyapatite to attenuate the effects of aging on bone loss and that it is significantly more effective than straight calcium supplements.

So what is your take on hydroxyapatite/nano-hydroxyapatite? Have you ever heard of it, or tried it either in your toothpaste, as a supplement or perhaps you've had an implant that's utilized hydroxyapatite?

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on June 05, 2013
at 12:02 PM

Maybe it doesn't dissolve in the stomach? (Although I can't see why it wouldn't, as the stomach is so acidic) Maybe the junk phosphates aren't really bioavailable for some reason? A biochemist or pharmacologist might know better than me

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 04, 2013
at 04:01 AM

Interesting pov celticcavegirl, I appreciate your valuable input. My only ish on this issue would be that the average person already gets lots of phosphate from junk foods: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100426151636.htm so it'd make sense according to that logic that adding calcium to a typical diet would balance out the phosphate but we don't see calcium supplementation having the same effects as hydroxyapatite supplementation which makes me think something is amiss.

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on June 04, 2013
at 12:38 AM

HA supplementation - more Ca2+ and (PO4)2- building blocks floating about. All mean better bones Regarding CG vs CHA - since the HA could well dissolve in the acidic conditions of the stomach, I automatically look at what's present in HA, but not present in CG - it's phosphate, (PO4)2-. If you're trying to build bones I suppose it makes sense to supplement with both parts of the building materials (Ca and PO4) rather than just one (Ca) - calcium supplementation isn't going to do much if there's not enough spare phosphate floating about?

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on June 04, 2013
at 12:35 AM

I don't know that much about the underlying molecuar biology. Osteocalin is a non-collagen bone protein (most of the protein in bone is collagen); I know it helps bone formation/density, probably by assisting the formation of the correct HA crystal structure. As far as carboxylation goes, it appears that the osteocalcin needs to be carboxylised to do it's job properly, which makes sense as if the protein is involved in directing crystal formation, its shape is absolutely critical, and carboxylation will affect the shape D3 = more osteocalcin K2 = better, carboxylated osteocalcin

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 03, 2013
at 08:36 PM

I've read that osteocalcin has a strong affinity for hydroxyapatite(HA) and that vitamin d3 increases osteocalcin production by osteoblasts. In the bolded study above supplemental HA along with vitamin d3 increased BMD in post menopausal women by 11+%. While d3+CG(Calcium Gluconate) had negligible results. This seems consistent with some other studies I've run across. Do you have any idea why this might be? Have you seen or learned about any synergy that may exist between D3, HA and possibly k2(which carboxylates osteocalcin)?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 03, 2013
at 08:27 PM

Interesting, thanks for the feedback.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 03, 2013
at 03:25 PM

Thank You j3wcy, I appreciate that.

5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a

(4713)

on June 03, 2013
at 03:21 PM

Stephen, I just came here to say that I really enjoy your questions and find them some of the most worthwhile on this site these days. Please keep it up.

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1 Answers

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68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on June 03, 2013
at 08:10 PM

Heard of it, yes. I did a course on Supramolecular chemistry as part of my Masters that covered the crystal structure of bone (which is composed of an inorganic element - hydroxyapatite crystals - and an organic element - collagen fibres. The latter is what gives bones their 'spring' ie. some degree of flexibility)

For sure I can see how hydroxyapatite could help, by "filling in" any gaps in the crystal structure of bone that develop on a molecular level over time. Maybe it could help fill in cracks on a macro-scale, too, but this would be slower In regular bone this might be limited by the loss of the collagen over time, meaning that the framework as well as the crystal molecular structure of the bone is compromised, but the chemical structure of tooth enamel is distinct from regular bone in that a) the hydroxyapatite crystal is very organised and b) It doesn't contain any collagen, and hardly contains any organic components at all which is why it's so brittle. In light of this, I suppose nano-hydroxyapatite would be more effective than regular hydroxyaptite.

I can see how supplementation of hydroxyapaptite would be better than pure calcium - bones are not made of calcium...but, there's an issue, which is this -

Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2(s) + 8H+(aq) ??? 10Ca2+(aq) + 6HPO42-(aq) + 2H2O(l)

What I'm saying is that hydroxyapatie (Ca5(PO4)3(OH), usually written Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 as the crystal unit cell is made up of two), is soluble in acid, and the stomach is very acidic.

Implants have a hydroxyapatite coating to effectively act as a "seed" crystal

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on June 04, 2013
at 12:38 AM

HA supplementation - more Ca2+ and (PO4)2- building blocks floating about. All mean better bones Regarding CG vs CHA - since the HA could well dissolve in the acidic conditions of the stomach, I automatically look at what's present in HA, but not present in CG - it's phosphate, (PO4)2-. If you're trying to build bones I suppose it makes sense to supplement with both parts of the building materials (Ca and PO4) rather than just one (Ca) - calcium supplementation isn't going to do much if there's not enough spare phosphate floating about?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 03, 2013
at 08:27 PM

Interesting, thanks for the feedback.

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on June 05, 2013
at 12:02 PM

Maybe it doesn't dissolve in the stomach? (Although I can't see why it wouldn't, as the stomach is so acidic) Maybe the junk phosphates aren't really bioavailable for some reason? A biochemist or pharmacologist might know better than me

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 03, 2013
at 08:36 PM

I've read that osteocalcin has a strong affinity for hydroxyapatite(HA) and that vitamin d3 increases osteocalcin production by osteoblasts. In the bolded study above supplemental HA along with vitamin d3 increased BMD in post menopausal women by 11+%. While d3+CG(Calcium Gluconate) had negligible results. This seems consistent with some other studies I've run across. Do you have any idea why this might be? Have you seen or learned about any synergy that may exist between D3, HA and possibly k2(which carboxylates osteocalcin)?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 04, 2013
at 04:01 AM

Interesting pov celticcavegirl, I appreciate your valuable input. My only ish on this issue would be that the average person already gets lots of phosphate from junk foods: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100426151636.htm so it'd make sense according to that logic that adding calcium to a typical diet would balance out the phosphate but we don't see calcium supplementation having the same effects as hydroxyapatite supplementation which makes me think something is amiss.

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on June 04, 2013
at 12:35 AM

I don't know that much about the underlying molecuar biology. Osteocalin is a non-collagen bone protein (most of the protein in bone is collagen); I know it helps bone formation/density, probably by assisting the formation of the correct HA crystal structure. As far as carboxylation goes, it appears that the osteocalcin needs to be carboxylised to do it's job properly, which makes sense as if the protein is involved in directing crystal formation, its shape is absolutely critical, and carboxylation will affect the shape D3 = more osteocalcin K2 = better, carboxylated osteocalcin

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