1

votes

Occasional red meat gives me a boost, why?

Commented on January 21, 2015
Created September 15, 2012 at 11:07 PM

I've been on paleo for a couple of months now.

I try to only eat meat when I know that it's well raised, well treated meat. In effect, this means I don't eat very much meat at all.

In the past few weeks I've eaten some nice big steaks twice. On both occasions I noticed the next day I felt better - mentally sharper and physically had more energy.

It's possible that this was coincidence, perhaps related to a better night's sleep, but I'd like to check in with some knowledgeable people on if I might be missing something that the red meat gave me.

My diet is reasonably stable. I eat 2-3 eggs for breakfast, fish a few times a week (baked cod/haddock, not very much oily fish), and lots of vegetables, carrots, broccoli, kale, zucchini/courgette, sweet potato. I eat lots of apples and bananas, dried figs and nuts as snacks throughout the day. (I average 50-100g of nuts/day). I buy a whole chicken maybe once a month. That's it, I haven't varied much from this for 4-6 weeks and in this period meat wise only had the two steaks and 1 whole chicken, meat wise.

Any input on the red meat question appreciated,

Thanks :)

JL

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on July 16, 2014
at 10:33 AM

Be careful of "balanced diets" - it's the password the media uses when they want to knock down something. There's nothing wrong with eating lots of grassfed meats, far more than what conventional wisdom says, especially if you include organ meats and the fatty portions too. Beef won't kill you, you could eat 3 grassfed rib eyes a day, and if anything, you'll be stronger, leaner and healthier and your heart will thank you.

B75d6f5785bfb47f42563de00849a467

(0)

on July 14, 2014
at 04:31 AM

I went to the computer to ask the question you just did, I am you, my diet is very similar and just recently I noticed a HUGE boost to my psychological well being and my physical strength/endurance. Not sure why this is so, it just happens, I am now a firm believer in once a week good steak and nobody will tell me different. I would rather die happier and younger instead of old an miserable if thats the argument. I say balance is the key, nothing wrong with a lil red every now and again.. Later...Ray Hanoski ,, Bakersfield ,,Cali

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 16, 2012
at 07:42 PM

Bah, mumbojumbo hippie BS. Speak in scientific terms or GTFO. :)

D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

(2029)

on September 16, 2012
at 03:46 AM

Also note, just because a food is "high" in a nutrient, doesn't mean that one food will supply all your daily needs of that nutrient. Animal foods do a much better job at supplying daily needs of several nutrients in one single serving than plant foods do. You make look into a tracking program like FitDay or Nutrition Data over a few days and see where you may habitually be lacking.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 16, 2012
at 02:39 AM

Nice, I'm gonna use that one.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 16, 2012
at 02:30 AM

Cashews, almonds, broccoli and kale have no B12. B12 is of microbial origin.

78972387772c994caa78513a83978437

(2290)

on September 16, 2012
at 01:13 AM

You buy a chicken once a... month?

Ba1c998b18470309687f07606767668a

(161)

on September 16, 2012
at 12:21 AM

Your suggestion is a good one, I really do need to invest the time to find a good source of meat I'm happy with. But I'd also like to try and understand specifically what it is in the meat that I might be benefiting from to see if it is possible to get this from another source, as although I'm not a vegetarian, vegetarians do seem to generally survive. I forgot to mention I do eat a fair amount of cheese, possibly a source of saturated fat?

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 16, 2012
at 12:20 AM

http://thatpaleoguy.com/2011/12/16/l-carnitine-paleo-eating-fat-burning-and-endurance-exercise/

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 16, 2012
at 12:20 AM

I just never assume an iron deficiency. You might have too little iron but I wouldn't expect you to feel different after eating meat one time, it would take a while to build up your iron stores. There's a list in this article of carnitine-containing foods http://suppversity.blogspot.ca/2011/07/amino-acids-for-super-humans-part-iv_17.html and also of its precursors. Looks like red meat is the only major viable source, but you could try just getting all of the precursors yourself. L-carnitine is a supplement, and if you take it you should take it with some sort of protein.

Ba1c998b18470309687f07606767668a

(161)

on September 16, 2012
at 12:16 AM

Thanks, this is really helpful and the kind of breakdown I was looking for. Shame I can't upvote yet. Iron's not on your list? Also going by the name I'm assuming not, but are carnitine and carnosine available from any other sources than meat?

Ba1c998b18470309687f07606767668a

(161)

on September 15, 2012
at 11:42 PM

Hm, how can I assess how much of these I should be getting, and how much I'm actually getting? A quick Google on B12 suggests that eggs are high. For B12 cashews and almonds (interestingly the only nuts I eat) and broccoli and kale.

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8 Answers

7
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 16, 2012
at 12:10 AM

We just have to rule out the deficiencies:

Choline? No you eat eggs.

B12: You eat eggs and fish.

Creatine? Fish.

Cholesterol? Eggs and fish.

The two that are left that aren't found in appreciable amounts in as large amounts in other foods are carnitine and carnosine. I think that carnitine is the most likely candidate because it's important for fatty acid metabolism.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 16, 2012
at 12:20 AM

I just never assume an iron deficiency. You might have too little iron but I wouldn't expect you to feel different after eating meat one time, it would take a while to build up your iron stores. There's a list in this article of carnitine-containing foods http://suppversity.blogspot.ca/2011/07/amino-acids-for-super-humans-part-iv_17.html and also of its precursors. Looks like red meat is the only major viable source, but you could try just getting all of the precursors yourself. L-carnitine is a supplement, and if you take it you should take it with some sort of protein.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 16, 2012
at 12:20 AM

http://thatpaleoguy.com/2011/12/16/l-carnitine-paleo-eating-fat-burning-and-endurance-exercise/

Ba1c998b18470309687f07606767668a

(161)

on September 16, 2012
at 12:16 AM

Thanks, this is really helpful and the kind of breakdown I was looking for. Shame I can't upvote yet. Iron's not on your list? Also going by the name I'm assuming not, but are carnitine and carnosine available from any other sources than meat?

7
5db74e51c32206b40ee62f49acd0df70

on September 15, 2012
at 11:45 PM

I don't mean to be a smart alec or anything, but you get a boost from eating meat because your body has evolved to eat meat - all kinds of meat, lots and lots of meat. Eating meat is a cornerstone of the Paleo diet. It's essential for many reasons, including the saturated fats in the meat, which your body uses for fuel (these fats are more efficient for your body and easier on it than carbohydrates). I would suggest you invest in a large freezer and find several local farms which raise meat the way you prefer it and then once or twice a year buy a 1/4 cow or 1/2 pig or whatever your preference, store and use that way. It will be nearly the same cost of grocery meat when done this way.

Ba1c998b18470309687f07606767668a

(161)

on September 16, 2012
at 12:21 AM

Your suggestion is a good one, I really do need to invest the time to find a good source of meat I'm happy with. But I'd also like to try and understand specifically what it is in the meat that I might be benefiting from to see if it is possible to get this from another source, as although I'm not a vegetarian, vegetarians do seem to generally survive. I forgot to mention I do eat a fair amount of cheese, possibly a source of saturated fat?

5
59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on September 15, 2012
at 11:27 PM

The flesh of the cow you are eating knows that you are concerned with the welfare of its brethren and is grateful to you for it, so it fills your veins with a rush of good karma that leaves you peppy and full of energy.

01cf0ae086d370128a58567843c92726

on January 21, 2015
at 06:15 PM

Oh come on, animals eat other animals. It's natural. I understand you have good intentions are far your beliefs but I don't think it's very fair or nice to be putting down others for what they choose to eat. It is their prerogative as it is yours.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 16, 2012
at 07:42 PM

Bah, mumbojumbo hippie BS. Speak in scientific terms or GTFO. :)

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 16, 2012
at 02:39 AM

Nice, I'm gonna use that one.

2
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 15, 2012
at 11:30 PM

Probably from the B12 and iron you may generally be lacking in.

D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

(2029)

on September 16, 2012
at 03:46 AM

Also note, just because a food is "high" in a nutrient, doesn't mean that one food will supply all your daily needs of that nutrient. Animal foods do a much better job at supplying daily needs of several nutrients in one single serving than plant foods do. You make look into a tracking program like FitDay or Nutrition Data over a few days and see where you may habitually be lacking.

Ba1c998b18470309687f07606767668a

(161)

on September 15, 2012
at 11:42 PM

Hm, how can I assess how much of these I should be getting, and how much I'm actually getting? A quick Google on B12 suggests that eggs are high. For B12 cashews and almonds (interestingly the only nuts I eat) and broccoli and kale.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 16, 2012
at 02:30 AM

Cashews, almonds, broccoli and kale have no B12. B12 is of microbial origin.

0
3f7e72bf6d40fa3f872bade25b86ff24

on October 02, 2012
at 10:33 PM

Oh my goodness this happens to me too! And then I wake up the next day feeling stronger, my skin is prettier, and after eating red meat I feel sharper- my vision is just better, I feel like I can hunt or something. It's so weird, but it's really cool at the same time. It may be due to anemia, as it runs in my family, so perhaps you're lacking iron. Previous answers state the lack of essential vitamins, so that could be it too. How exactly do you feel when you eat red meat?

0
66aa2c18606c628985a78c3e70092684

on September 16, 2012
at 01:04 AM

You may want to get a CBC w/diff and CMP done

0
08527df7a704aad2ddf12a840abe7963

on September 16, 2012
at 12:35 AM

Men don't usually have iron deficiency. How about essential fatty acids? You get these from grass-fed beef in much higher quantities than from factory-farmed beef. They are a key to keeping your mental focus sharp and your mood positive. It's the omega-3 that most people usually lack in their diet. A good liquid fish-oil is an excellent supplement to get your omega-3s.

01cf0ae086d370128a58567843c92726

on January 21, 2015
at 06:11 PM

I have an iron deficiency as anemia runs in my family also potassium deficiency too. I'm also a man. I know how it's not very common but I tried a vegan diet once and almost literally died. I feel that one size fits all isn't a wise approach. For some it may work, for me it doesn't.

0
5623f2e264246a497fce7c4a7e00f6d2

on September 15, 2012
at 11:57 PM

your diet seems to be very very low in fat. That fat from the steak is probably what is doing it.

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