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Promoting blood vessel regrowth after surgery

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 08, 2013 at 6:24 PM

Hi all!

I am recovering from a bone surgery (removed the metal) and it was quite heavy, they removed 9 screws and a plate from the top 5 cm of my tibia. That is a lot.

I am supplementing a lot (mag, cal, vit+minerals).

Recovery is very quick - everyone thinks the scar is older than it actually is. Bone recovery is hard to say.

But - there is a problem, the regrowth of blood vessels is limited. I have to put my leg above my waist to prevent pain and swelling, even after 4 weeks after surgery. I have serious issues with my condition if I use the leg. If I use other body parts for training, I have a good condition and I am not short of breath. Those two make me conclude that the bloodvessels are not completely restored. I know from a TED talk (1) that eating paleo limits angiogenesis (that is the process of blood vessel creation) that protects us from cancer. I don't want to limit angiogenesis for a while, but I don't want to eat SAD. Any hints on the topic?

1) http://www.ted.com/talks/william_li.html

5b8cf203186c3cb7810f5046e0532be8

(166)

on February 08, 2013
at 07:28 PM

Vit D levels are unknown but probably alright: this summer it was about 70 ng/l and I supplemented 3000 IU daily from there. Since I am not overweight I assume it is enough.

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5b8cf203186c3cb7810f5046e0532be8

(166)

on February 13, 2013
at 01:00 PM

Summary:

  1. anaerobic exercise of affected part
  2. avoid some foods, supplements and if possible drugs
  3. (unsure) up the carbs

Anaerobic exercise

Vesselgrowth is being promoted by the Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) hormone. This hormone is produced by the body in conditions when cells are in shortage of oxygen. It is simple to create shortage of oxygen: find an exercise where you get sore muscles during exercise caused by lactic acid. When lactic acid is produced there was anaerobic metabolism which in turn stimulates VEGF hormone production.

For what I know of training: use the muscle for slow movement with a heavy weight, and keep the muscle contracted during the full exercise until you cannot hold it anymore. While you keep the muscle contracted the blood flow is restricted and oxygen is depleted quicker so maximizing the VEGF production. You can repeat this exercise multiple times per day.

Foods and supplements to avoid

There are some foods, supplements and drugs which inhibit VEGF production so it might be a good idea to calm down on the usage on those if you have to recover from surgery (of course consult your doctor if unsure).

Known VEGF production inhibiters are (from William Li)

  • Soy
  • Artichoke
  • Parsly
  • Berries
  • Garlic
  • Grapes
  • reservatrol

List of drugs and foods that inhibit VEGH production on Wikipedia

Low carb diet inhibits vessel regrowth in mice (link)

Effect of LCHP Diet on Neovascularization. To further characterize the effects of the LCHP diet on vascular health, we examined the formation of postnatal blood vessels or neovascularization in a hindlimb ischemia (HLI) model. Neovascularization is an independent vascular function essential in the healing response after ischemic injury that has previously been linked to EPC function (26, 27). Because C57BL/6 mice also showed a decrease in bone marrow-derived EPC-CFUs by 4 weeks on the LCHP diet (Fig. S3) and we were interested in the effect of these diets without the confounding influences of marked hypercholester-olemia seen in ApoE mice, we examined neovascularization in wild-type C57BL/7 mice. After 4 weeks on the WD or LCHP diets, C57BL/6mice were subjected to unilateral surgical ligation of the femoral artery and its branches to induce HLI. After HLI, recovery of flow correlates with neovascularization (26) and can be measured by laser doppler flux compared with the normal limb. Recovery of perfusion after ischemia was approximately 39% less in mice on the LCHP diet compared with mice on the WD at 28 days after surgery (45.324% of that in the normal limb vs. 74.2 16%,P0.013; Fig. 3). Thus, in addition to increasing atherosclerosis in ApoE mice, the LCHP diet impaired neovascularization in wild-type mice, consistent with an effect on EPCs and suggesting broader relevance to these observations beyond the ApoE model of atherogenesis.

Humans are not mice. I have no idea if this effect can be translated to human. But it might explain why my leg lags proper vessel regrowth, I was on a low carb paleo (~100 gr. carb / day). It cannot hurt to up the carbs a while in order to speed up the process.

Good luck recovering!

0
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on February 08, 2013
at 07:20 PM

5b8cf203186c3cb7810f5046e0532be8

(166)

on February 08, 2013
at 07:28 PM

Vit D levels are unknown but probably alright: this summer it was about 70 ng/l and I supplemented 3000 IU daily from there. Since I am not overweight I assume it is enough.

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