1

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Diet help for BJJ and weight training on the same day?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 10, 2011 at 3:47 PM

I've been really getting into BJJ and want to get as good as possible, so I need to bump my BJJ training up from 2 days a week to at least 4. Right now I do 1.5 hour class (1 hour of technique and 30 minutes of rolling) on an empty stomach in the morning. My post workout meal is usually 4 eggs and a large yam. I also train with weights 3 days a week not on an empty stomach for about 30-40 minutes. Some days are oly type training and aome is interval type. My post workout meal is usually some type of meat and a large yam.

I would like to maintain my weight training while increasing my BJJ training but not sure how to approach it with regards to diet if I do them on the same day. Any suggestions?

I'm 5'5 150lbs and probably 8-10% bf.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 11, 2011
at 02:47 PM

On days of double work outs I would reduce the total time it takes to complete the weight lifting...

254ea62982c287995e11bc3cfd629407

(822)

on June 10, 2011
at 07:05 PM

Thanks (and good question, too). I really think it all depends on you and your capacity. That's why I suggested really logging everything so you can more easily arrive at this question yourself rather than listening to someone who gives you a prescription and is ultimately, wrong. We have pro MMA guys who might have 3-4 training sessions (weights, running, skills and sparring) in a day. While I personally think they court over-training constantly, they seem to be able to do it...so don't limit yourself until you do some self-experimenting. Again, best of luck on your journey.

22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on June 10, 2011
at 06:50 PM

Great post...thanks! On the days that I am doubling up would you do lower volume higher intensity weight training or Oly type training?

22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on June 10, 2011
at 04:15 PM

And the 30 minutes is very intense. Usually do 5 minute rounds with 1 minute rest.

22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on June 10, 2011
at 04:14 PM

The one hour is practicing specific submissions, takedowns, etc but it's not very strenuous. Definitely break a sweat though.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 10, 2011
at 04:07 PM

I have never done Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu how hard is the one hour -vs- the 30 min?

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1 Answers

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254ea62982c287995e11bc3cfd629407

(822)

on June 10, 2011
at 06:36 PM

Hemanvt,

Fellow BJJer and weight training enthusiast here. The good news is, it depends. The bad news is, it depends.

Seriously, though, if the basic question is whether or not the human body could perform two training sessions a day, well, sure. The key to this would be how much are you able to tolerate it or, even thrive, during it.

And that's the "bad" news.

Not so much "bad" as it would require you to experiment and be cognizant of your reaction to any of the variables. Be sure you're keeping a log of your training. That way, as you are trying to evaluate your body's response to the training stress, you're clear if you are trending positively or negatively as you change the experiment.

The variables I would watch are: 1. Sleep 2. Nutrition 3. Environmental stress (work, school, social) 4. Intensity of training

Obviously, you would want to ensure you're tops in sleep and nutrition (and tracking that), trying to keep your stress levels low and monitoring the intensity of either of your training sessions. The logs will help you to ascertain what level of training you can handle and empirically define if you're doing well (getting stronger, rolling with better intensity, etc.).

As you define your baseline (e.g. I need this much sleep, this much/kind of food, etc.) you can then calibrate your workouts if any of those variables are different than normal. For example, if you're less rested than normal, if you're nutrition sucks or you haven't recovered from a particularly difficult weight training session, you can vary your workouts so you risk less injury or beat up your immune system and get sick.

I've been doing BJJ for about five years and have been a gym rat for 20. As a busy professional with a huge family, I have to make all the parts fit well in order to maintain this high level of commitment. Good luck.

22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on June 10, 2011
at 06:50 PM

Great post...thanks! On the days that I am doubling up would you do lower volume higher intensity weight training or Oly type training?

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 11, 2011
at 02:47 PM

On days of double work outs I would reduce the total time it takes to complete the weight lifting...

254ea62982c287995e11bc3cfd629407

(822)

on June 10, 2011
at 07:05 PM

Thanks (and good question, too). I really think it all depends on you and your capacity. That's why I suggested really logging everything so you can more easily arrive at this question yourself rather than listening to someone who gives you a prescription and is ultimately, wrong. We have pro MMA guys who might have 3-4 training sessions (weights, running, skills and sparring) in a day. While I personally think they court over-training constantly, they seem to be able to do it...so don't limit yourself until you do some self-experimenting. Again, best of luck on your journey.

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