2

votes

What are your favorite St Patrick's Day paleo dishes?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 17, 2012 at 6:21 AM

What are your favorite St Patrick's Day paleo dishes?

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 20, 2012
at 05:46 AM

That is awesome! Best Wishes

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:07 AM

Go raibh maith agut Eric, totally pedatic but it's orat, not oraibh as oraibh is for you (plural) and orat is you (singular) :)

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 18, 2012
at 07:41 AM

Beannachtaí na Féile Pádraig oraibh Sarah Ann! Thank you for sharing.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 18, 2012
at 07:38 AM

Spot On Loon!!!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 18, 2012
at 06:36 AM

Corned beef, by definition, has tons of "flavor" added by all those chemicals. It's like bacon or hame; you can rinse some off and simmer some out but if you want to avoid chemicals altogether don't eat corned beef. I like it as mild as I can get it, but since I hadn't had any in many years it was a nice treat, just as a meal of well-rinsed/simmered ham was at Christmas.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on March 18, 2012
at 06:25 AM

And this is packaged corned beef brisket that we're talking about right, the kind that usually comes with nitrates and erythrobates? I'm beginning to think perhaps Libby's canned corned beef contains less gunk than these packaged corned beef briskets, which are delicious when you boil them just long enough ... 3 hours for a good chunk. Next time, I'll try washing it thoroughly and see what that does to the flavor.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 18, 2012
at 05:26 AM

I haven't yet made sauerkraut; I buy the refrigerator kind rather than the stuff in cans but it has "ingredients." My RV kitchen is truly tiny so water kefir and yogurt are all I can manage.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 18, 2012
at 05:25 AM

I'm sure the meat still contained plenty of "adulterates" but it was a much lighter color and had a nice light flavor that had only a hint of "corned" flavor. BTW, I also use water to lighten the flavor of picnic hams to much more like Danish.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on March 18, 2012
at 04:57 AM

Just curious, you rinse the corned beef thoroughly before boiling to wash off the sodium nitrates, sodium erythorbate, and artificial flavirings? Also, do you make your own sauerkraut?

B9637ddb9a9a5c6a7306e3c804fcd21d

(3217)

on March 17, 2012
at 08:34 PM

sarah-anne - thanks for the info, I didn't know that! I've just seen a lot of celeriac recipes in 'irish cuisine' sections on a lot of websites (BBC is one of them!) so I assumed they were a traditional root veg. :-)

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on March 17, 2012
at 04:19 PM

Just an FYI, I am Irish and celariac is definitely not traditional here. They have appeared in the last decade and are still hard to get.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 17, 2012
at 01:18 PM

Good Choice mloster!

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 17, 2012
at 01:17 PM

Very Nice Answer Milla!!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 17, 2012
at 12:47 PM

It appears that you enjoy St. Patrick's day a little. Nice answer!

0266737ea1782946902fd3f8e60fa0b9

(2504)

on March 17, 2012
at 06:32 AM

certainly better than shamrock shakes and green beer :)

  • 1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

    asked by

    (20378)
  • Views
    2.5K
  • Last Activity
    1261D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

best answer

3
B9637ddb9a9a5c6a7306e3c804fcd21d

(3217)

on March 17, 2012
at 11:09 AM

Hi Eric!

St Patrick's day is a feast day, celebrating the Patron Saint of Ireland, and a day when the Lenten restrictions (no animal products or alcohol) were lifted. So, traditionally, St. Patrick's day recipes usually involve a combination of meat (not a problem...), beer and potatoes (the Irish staple; could be a problem for some people who avoid excess starch). I've never specifically cooked for St Patrick's day, but I've made a stew with homemade apple kvass (which is a Russian fermented drink, so not very Irish! But its a good substitute for beer); you could also use gluten-free cider (traditional cider should be gluten free). Just slow-cook lamb (or mutton), potatoes/faux-tatoes [turnips, parsnips, swedes, etc], carrots, celery, onions, garlic & a bouquet garni in a mixture of broth & cider.

The most popular meat in Ireland is probably lamb and mutton, which marries very well with anything sweet; fish and shellfish are also plentiful in Ireland, so another great recipe is Mussels steamed in cider with bacon & onions; cream can be stirred in at the end of cooking - like an Irish version of Moules Mariniere.

Boiled bacon with cabbage is also a great recipe, which tastes a lot better than it sounds. The key to that is a good, gelatinous stock (pig foot is excellent for this; otherwise, chicken stock is fine) to boil the bacon (very thick back bacon, unsmoked; you can use smoked, of course, but I find that too overpowering - I see smoked bacon as more of an accompaniment than a main) and carrots (whole baby carrots are best); add the cabbage at the last 15 minutes of cooking.

Colcannon is a wonderful side dish - you may use celeriac (also popular in ireland) or white turnips, and even parsnips, if you do not wish to use potatoes; just saute the potato/fauxtato-of-choice in good grassfed butter, and puree; saute the bacon, cabbage and some shallots in the same pan, add to the mash and stir in some heavy cream. You can add some ghee if you're dairy-free, or some almond milk.

I love black pudding, which is basically Irish blood sausage. The traditional version involves some sort of grain as filler, so I make my own; I know a good butcher and get some pig blood from him; you can also find frozen pig blood or pig blood cubes at Asian supermarkets; I mix it with pastured pork, herbs (sage, marjoram, thyme, parsley and dill), some egg yolks and mild mushrooms (just buttons), and form into patties which I poach in some bone broth. Black pudding goes well with bacon, and root vegetables. It can be added to a stew, or served alongside a celeriac cream-soup with bacon. You can also simply fry it up with onions and bacon.

Hope these come in handy!

Lots of [Irish] luck to you. Don't give money to leprechauns, no matter how hard they beg.

Milla

:-)

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 17, 2012
at 01:17 PM

Very Nice Answer Milla!!

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on March 17, 2012
at 04:19 PM

Just an FYI, I am Irish and celariac is definitely not traditional here. They have appeared in the last decade and are still hard to get.

B9637ddb9a9a5c6a7306e3c804fcd21d

(3217)

on March 17, 2012
at 08:34 PM

sarah-anne - thanks for the info, I didn't know that! I've just seen a lot of celeriac recipes in 'irish cuisine' sections on a lot of websites (BBC is one of them!) so I assumed they were a traditional root veg. :-)

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 17, 2012
at 12:47 PM

It appears that you enjoy St. Patrick's day a little. Nice answer!

2
A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

on March 17, 2012
at 04:27 PM

Is ??ireannach m??!(I'm Irish) and I live in the west of Ireland and Irish cuisine is usually meat and vegetables boiled until unrecognisable. :)

Bacon and cabbage is usual, but also mashed potatoes and turnip is delicious and very easy to make.

Colcannon is potato mashed with butter and kale and some spring onions.

Boxty is a type of potato bread made with flour but you can just make grated potato cakes too.

Despite being an Island nation, Ireland does not have a big tradition of eating fish or shellfish at all. I think we associate with having to eat it on holy days as meat was forbidden. We do eat seafood chowder with smoked fish and mussels though. This is a cream based soup thickened with potato.

Basically making any Irish dish without potato is heresy!

Beannachta?? na F??ile P??draig oraibh!

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 18, 2012
at 07:41 AM

Beannachtaí na Féile Pádraig oraibh Sarah Ann! Thank you for sharing.

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on March 19, 2012
at 12:07 AM

Go raibh maith agut Eric, totally pedatic but it's orat, not oraibh as oraibh is for you (plural) and orat is you (singular) :)

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 20, 2012
at 05:46 AM

That is awesome! Best Wishes

2
9ac8a7b68cf079b22de42b703e466e64

(787)

on March 17, 2012
at 06:31 AM

If you eat potatoes and can get some decent corned beef (or make it yourself), I'd say some corned beef hash is by far the best St. Patrick's Day possible.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 17, 2012
at 01:18 PM

Good Choice mloster!

0266737ea1782946902fd3f8e60fa0b9

(2504)

on March 17, 2012
at 06:32 AM

certainly better than shamrock shakes and green beer :)

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 17, 2012
at 05:02 PM

It had actually been a while since I'd had corned beef but a friend bought too much and gave me enough for me and the grandkid.

I gave it a thorough rinse in water, then simmered it in clean water for a few hours. That gave it a very mild flavor which I really enjoyed.

My total menu was sauerkraut on 2 slices of corned beef plus baked sweet potato stacked with cooked asparagus and just a little butter.

Because of the novelty, it really tasted like a holiday dinner. I didn't have my usual leafy salad, which also made it feel different.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on March 18, 2012
at 04:57 AM

Just curious, you rinse the corned beef thoroughly before boiling to wash off the sodium nitrates, sodium erythorbate, and artificial flavirings? Also, do you make your own sauerkraut?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 18, 2012
at 06:36 AM

Corned beef, by definition, has tons of "flavor" added by all those chemicals. It's like bacon or hame; you can rinse some off and simmer some out but if you want to avoid chemicals altogether don't eat corned beef. I like it as mild as I can get it, but since I hadn't had any in many years it was a nice treat, just as a meal of well-rinsed/simmered ham was at Christmas.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 18, 2012
at 05:25 AM

I'm sure the meat still contained plenty of "adulterates" but it was a much lighter color and had a nice light flavor that had only a hint of "corned" flavor. BTW, I also use water to lighten the flavor of picnic hams to much more like Danish.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on March 18, 2012
at 06:25 AM

And this is packaged corned beef brisket that we're talking about right, the kind that usually comes with nitrates and erythrobates? I'm beginning to think perhaps Libby's canned corned beef contains less gunk than these packaged corned beef briskets, which are delicious when you boil them just long enough ... 3 hours for a good chunk. Next time, I'll try washing it thoroughly and see what that does to the flavor.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 18, 2012
at 05:26 AM

I haven't yet made sauerkraut; I buy the refrigerator kind rather than the stuff in cans but it has "ingredients." My RV kitchen is truly tiny so water kefir and yogurt are all I can manage.

1
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on March 17, 2012
at 03:18 PM

Meat and veggies, just like every other day. Lots of green veggies.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 18, 2012
at 07:38 AM

Spot On Loon!!!

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!