2

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Recipes: cow knees/legs?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 03, 2012 at 11:56 PM

Today I asked the butcher for some bones and ended up buying something that I think are cow knees or legs (??)...

I thought of making stock with it, but now I'm wondering if that's the best idea. Anyone has any good suggestions?

This was my first time at the butcher (very proud). Before, I was buying meat in homeopathic doses from supermarkets - I'm in Denmark, and not being fluent in danish also explains why I'm not 100% sure of what I bought, LOL.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on February 04, 2012
at 05:38 PM

Thanks for the video, I'm glad to know I can make stock without having the stove on all night! I really enjoyed hearing all the good properties of joints. :)

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on February 04, 2012
at 05:31 PM

Thanks Amy! I will try that. :)

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on February 04, 2012
at 05:07 PM

ya, the toast is toast :)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 04, 2012
at 03:41 PM

That looks yummy- just need a toast replacement, or use a spoon.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on February 04, 2012
at 11:39 AM

Wow, if I had looked at that dish a few months ago I would have thought there was nothing to eat there! Now it looks like something I would pay for, very nourishing. The bones I bought are cut almost triangular, but now I know what to do if I find some lengthwise cut. Thanks!

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on February 04, 2012
at 11:32 AM

I wondered if they could be beef feet bones too, but since they have some cartilage on, I thought they were knees (I'm new to all this, so I don't know much). I did ask the butcher for bones for "soup". He smiled, and had this expression as in "I know exactly what you need", LOL, so I trust he gave me something good for stock. I feel tempted to use the pressure pan to save time, but I'm afraid of destroying some precious nutrients this way... Thank you all for your answers!

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on February 04, 2012
at 09:01 AM

Or about 3 hours in a good pressure cooker or canner. Saves electricity and makes a better stock.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on February 04, 2012
at 01:47 AM

LOL! I loved your question! I wonder if they could be beef feet bones? They're frequently available and make the most wonderful, gooey broth you could imagine but it takes about 18 hours in the slow-cooker to get down to clean bones.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 04, 2012
at 01:15 AM

They work well in stock in my experience.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on February 04, 2012
at 12:19 AM

Thanks! That does sound delicious!

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4 Answers

best answer

3
0c875e97044bf838a074470caa5d630d

on February 04, 2012
at 12:07 AM

I like to braise tougher cuts of meat (which usually are more bone than meat). Brown with some good oil (like coconut oil) on all sides in a hot pan, then saute some veggies like onion, carrot, celery and garlic until the onions are translucent. Then add enough water (or wine) to the pot to cover the meat and simmer for hours and hours until the meat is falling apart. You cannot overcook it this way! The longer it cooks, the more delicious it will be.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on February 04, 2012
at 12:19 AM

Thanks! That does sound delicious!

3
6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on February 04, 2012
at 04:16 PM

Hi Pedrita,

Joint bones make a great addition to bone stock and adds additional nutrients not found non-joint bones.

Here is a nice video with Dr Cate Shanahan (who is a member here) author of Deep Nutrition making bone stock and making reference to include a knee bone.

http://undergroundwellness.com/how-to-make-beef-bone-broth/

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on February 04, 2012
at 05:38 PM

Thanks for the video, I'm glad to know I can make stock without having the stove on all night! I really enjoyed hearing all the good properties of joints. :)

2
Fdfd4b681bfac18c64c7ec999a4021d7

on February 04, 2012
at 02:43 PM

You can use them to make stock, but still take the bones out at the end (or middle, depending on how long you're cooking it) and eat the marrow. It's delicious.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on February 04, 2012
at 05:31 PM

Thanks Amy! I will try that. :)

1
B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on February 04, 2012
at 09:05 AM

my dad was from the caribbean and cow foot is a common thing to prepare. its actually the whole leg bone, not really the foot. if you can get the butcher to cut it lengthwise you could roast it.

the joint is best used for soup.

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on February 04, 2012
at 05:07 PM

ya, the toast is toast :)

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on February 04, 2012
at 11:39 AM

Wow, if I had looked at that dish a few months ago I would have thought there was nothing to eat there! Now it looks like something I would pay for, very nourishing. The bones I bought are cut almost triangular, but now I know what to do if I find some lengthwise cut. Thanks!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 04, 2012
at 03:41 PM

That looks yummy- just need a toast replacement, or use a spoon.

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