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Paleo on $450 a month?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 29, 2012 at 2:01 AM

Has anyone successfully cooked paleo for two on less than $450 a month, groceries and grass fed meat included?

My husband and I are saving for the down payment of a new home and need all the extra money we can come by so I am trying to limit the grocery bill somewhat.

If you do it, HOW? What do you cook? Any high yield recipes (besides chili lol) for me? Specifics would be great and any advice is awesome.

Thanks!!

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 29, 2012
at 04:58 PM

Love this, borofergie. :)

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on November 29, 2012
at 02:25 AM

I wish I had $450.00 a month for groceries :)

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9 Answers

3
D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

on November 29, 2012
at 02:18 AM

My husband and I eat on $300ish a month. We get our meat from a local, grass-fed rancher.

Availability and costs vary from region to region. Cost of living is very low where I live, but that's offset by the very low income most people here survive on. We make our less than $20,000/yr stretch, but most here depend on government aid.

We eat eggs for breakfast every day. Eggs are cheap protein no matter how you slice it. Even at $3.50/dozen from my local rancher, they're still cheaper than ground beef. Sometimes, I'll eat an omelet for lunch or dinner paired with something green on the side. Might add a sweet potato or something.

We supplement with inexpensive organ meats. Ground or chopped liver and/or heart make ground beef stretch.

We do keep it simple. We try to spend more of our budget on the basic meat and produce, and less of it on random other condiments and packaged paleo-friendly stuff (coconut milk, nuts, etc.). As for fats, I can get lard and tallow from my rancher for 1.50/lb. After rendering, this is still half the price of pastured butter or coconut oil.

Admittedly, while I eat enough calories, my husband doesn't. He's starting to waste away a little from lack of calories paired with his manual labor job, so we're going to have to increase our budget a little.

In my opinion, a grocery budget is usually the LAST place you need to cut corners. But I don't know what the rest of your budget looks like. Maybe you can think of something less important to cut.

1
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on November 29, 2012
at 04:49 PM

We spend about $600/mo for three of us, so $450/mo for two is totally reasonable. We live in an expensive area and aren't careful on sales and only shop at whole foods. So with a little bit of extra effort we could probably cut $100 or so off of that. So I see no issue with you doing paleo on $450/mo.

1
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on November 29, 2012
at 01:31 PM

I recently bought a half of a grass-fed steer for about $1100 from a farm in my state (not quite local but a few hours away). This required some planning and a big freezer but the cost fully processed came out to less than $5.50/lb for over 200 pounds of meat, which is actually somewhat on the expensive side, I have heard of people doing it for $3.50/lb. We also got some extras like a 2nd tongue, some extra organs (i.e. sweetbreads), two large bags of marrow bones, etc. I guess stuff that they throw away or other customers didn't want. We had other organs (heart, brain) ground up into the ground meat.

This has provided nearly a year's worth of beef for a family of four, and it's fantastic beef too, much better than what I get in the stores. I found the place by talking to the local fancy gourmet butchers and finding out where they get their beef, and then calling those farms and seeing if they would sell direct.

1
B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on November 29, 2012
at 11:23 AM

Two words: Road Kill.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 29, 2012
at 04:58 PM

Love this, borofergie. :)

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on November 29, 2012
at 07:26 PM

I like foods that go a long way to stretch the budget.

Chicken is good for a minimum of three meals: We eat the roasted dark meat for dinner one night, the white meat goes into something else since we don't like it that much on its own, and then the carcass makes bone broth.

I stretch grass fed ground meat by adding some spinach, mushrooms, onions, etc. That makes a pound last for dinner and a couple of breakfast sides. We try to buy our meat on sale when we can.

I make whatever I can from ingredients instead of buying the finished product at the store--that's usually a money saver. Things I make include yogurt, broth, kefir, sauerkraut and pickles, and bread for the grain eaters in the family. I make my own coconut butter from dried coconut which is fairly inexpensive. I make my own jerky, too. When we have a surplus or things are in season at good prices, I dehydrate what I can to save for leaner times.

Eggs are always inexpensive sources of good fat and proteins. Canned fish is great to stock up on when on sale. Costco has a couple of pounds of Coconut oil for $11 now, that's really inexpensive. It takes some work but your efforts can save a lot of money.

0
46c9fbd45b82453f6a2dfe614a853314

on November 29, 2012
at 05:09 PM

I think that $450 is more than adequate to provide for your family for the month (although I admit that most of what I purchase is not organic or grassfed, I just can't afford it). I'm no Extreme Couponer, but do buy the veggies that are on sale at the grocery store and frequently find coupons for bagged fresh salads and frozen veggies. I do tend to buy root veggies in bulk and throw them in the slow cooker with cheap cuts of meat. By the end of the day, I have delish broth, a tender cut of meat (that would otherwise be tough), and plenty of veggies (usually carrots, sweet taters, cabbage works good, onions). This makes a lot of food for my husband and I, so we usually freeze half. Also never hurts if you have farm stands near by, to bargain/barter with them. Most of them would rather sell their produce at a lower price than throw it away. If you stock up on something, can it/freeze it (ie tomatoes, they are usually free by the end of the summer by the box and can very well in sauce or salsa). Just throwing out some of the things I do to save money. I also buy half a butchered pig and cow every year and it is MUCH cheaper than buying cuts of meat at the store.

0
2e777bbcd49262eb31a24f821abec6bc

(1974)

on November 29, 2012
at 11:19 AM

My SO and I spend around 400 a month. I make recipes in bulk and we don't get much variety within the week. For instance, I made a huge turkey this week that I bought very cheap the day after thanksgiving. We have eaten half of it this week and I used the other half to make a soup that I froze and will take out in a couple weeks. Next week I will buy a different meat or two. We stick to the cheaper veggies such as carrots and broccoli and I buy our nuts and dried fruit in bulk. Eggs are also cheap so we go through a dozen or two a week. I also just focus on not letting anything get wasted. I like to make meat patties with beef and minced veggies. If it looks like we have some veggies that will not last much longer then I throw them in the food processor and make the meat patties for dinner.

0
74c1777d7d39b053ca64c065dcdb0072

on November 29, 2012
at 03:16 AM

You just have to plan out your meals and buy in bulk. Local paleo communities organize cow and pork shares to lower the cost and support local farmers.

We organize a meatshare and do cowpools. I tend to pay $6/lb for grassfed dry aged beef,$4/lb for pastured pork.

For anyone in the NYC area, checkout http://www.meetup.com/meatshare/

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