4

votes

lamb heart recipes?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 06, 2012 at 11:21 PM

i finally made myself defrost the lamb hearts that i've been procrastinating cooking. any quick recipe recommendations?

4d6aa1a676240b15dc569ff8ade0500f

(2546)

on February 07, 2012
at 09:18 PM

i ended up slicing it into strips, marinating it in a bit of olive oil, cumin, crushed garlic, salt and pepper and simply stir frying it for about 2 minutes a side. sooooo delish! i was totally surprised!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 07, 2012
at 03:30 AM

Yeah- almost like killing game with a club in the good old days.

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on February 07, 2012
at 02:38 AM

nice visual :))

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 07, 2012
at 01:36 AM

I basically do the same thing. After cleaning off the fat and icky bits, instead of cutting the heart thinner, I beat it with a mallet to thin it out.

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9 Answers

2
22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on February 07, 2012
at 12:39 AM

When I bought lamb heart I just sliced it in half so it was about the thickness of a steak and cooked it on a cast iron skillet much like I would a steak, utilizing a lid over the top. Just sprinkle some garlic and salt on it and cook it until it is charred on top and bottom. I cooked it in ghee. It's better than steak in my opinion. With the way I cooked it and the delicious flavor and texture it reminded me a little of foie gras.

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on February 07, 2012
at 02:38 AM

nice visual :))

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 07, 2012
at 01:36 AM

I basically do the same thing. After cleaning off the fat and icky bits, instead of cutting the heart thinner, I beat it with a mallet to thin it out.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 07, 2012
at 03:30 AM

Yeah- almost like killing game with a club in the good old days.

2
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on February 06, 2012
at 11:29 PM

IT's relatively mild when fresh, when frozen I find it's texture a bit odd but the flavor is still good. For that reason, I like to use it in lamb burgers or in gyro meat (using Alton Brown's recipe), mixing 1 part heart to 1 part ground lamb... add some fat to the mix though, room-temperature butter or coconut fat will work well.

1
B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on February 07, 2012
at 10:17 AM

Substitute it for sliced steak or stir-fry meat ...

  • Explanation: Heart has a mild flavor since heart is a muscle!
  • My favorite use: Stir-fry since it cooks very fast.
    • Especially handy in locations where lean quick cooking meat and steak is stupid expensive (i.e. here in London)

There is no need to supply specific recipes. The internet is full of recipes for all of the below.

I have heart in at least 1 dish a week across several meals, such as.
  1. pan fry with spices and veg (my standard several times a week)
  2. curries and stir-fry (Think Thai, Vietnamese, South-East Asia)
  3. add to meat loafs, burgers, meatzas, stews, (...) to bump up the nutrient content
  4. pur??e into liver pate to get a milder flavor
    • *extra benefit: reduces the amount of Vitamin A from liver so I won't die from toxicity (I love pate!)
  5. cook like steak (NASA hot in cast-iron)

1
9dcf0fbfb9571ab16946eddae66f4f3e

(110)

on February 07, 2012
at 08:17 AM

I chop them up and make a Moroccan tagine style stew out of them.

Ingredients - 1 tsp cayenne pepper - 2 tsp ground black pepper - 1?? tbsp paprika - 1?? tbsp ground ginger - 1 tbsp turmeric - 2 tsp ground cinnamon - 1 x shoulder of lamb, trimmed and cut into 5cm/2in chunks (about 1.1kg/2??lb meat in total) - 2 large onions, grated - 2 tbsp olive oil - 3 cloves garlic, crushed - 570ml/1 pint tomato juice - 2 x 400g tinned chopped tomatoes - 115g/4oz dried apricots, cut in half - 55g/2oz dates, cut in half - 55g/2oz sultanas or raisins - 85g/3oz flaked almonds - 1 tsp saffron stamens, soaked in cold water - 600ml/1 pint lamb stock - 1 tbsp clear honey - 2 tbsp coriander, roughly chopped

- 2 tbsp flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped

Shopping list Top Method 1. Preheat the oven to 150C/300F/Gas2. 2. Place the cayenne, black pepper, paprika, ginger, turmeric and cinnamon into a small bowl and mix to combine. Place the lamb in a large bowl and toss together with half of the spice mix. Cover and leave overnight in the fridge. 3. Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a large casserole dish. Add the grated onion and the remaining spice mix and cook over a gentle heat for 10 minutes so that the onions are soft but not coloured. Add the crushed garlic for the final 3 minutes. 4. In a separate frying pan, heat the remaining oil and brown the cubes of lamb on all sides then add the browned meat to the casserole dish. De-glaze the frying pan with ?? pint of tomato juice and add these juices to the pan. 5. Add the remaining tomato juice, chopped tomatoes, apricots, dates, raisins or sultanas, flaked almonds, saffron, lamb stock and honey to the casserole dish. Bring to the boil, cover with a fitted lid, place in the oven and cook for 2-2?? hours or until the meat is meltingly tender. 6. Place the lamb in a tagine or large serving dish and sprinkle over the chopped herbs. Serve.

That's pretty much it, works with most lamb meat and is also great with chicken thighs.

1
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on February 07, 2012
at 05:09 AM

I made tartare with it once. It was really yummy. I used cilantro instead of parsley and good pastured yolks. You could make shishkabobs with it too. heart is good grilled.

1
737471a5bc1c8b81d968c3f3fcd13b71

on February 07, 2012
at 03:53 AM

I made it for the first time last week, and was thrilled with the taste. Sliced about 1/2" thick or so, then seared on medium-high in butter with bay leaves and rosemary. Simple and super tasty.

0
8d6d892104f5c4391815f0645dd738ea

on July 02, 2013
at 12:48 AM

I've had lamb heart many ways. One traditional method is to boil it with a little salt, then slice it into bite sized pieces. That same method was used for lamb tongue.

I prefer to pan fry it with a little olive oil, and sprinkle some oregano and fresh ground pepper on it. That is a fast and simple method.

0
43e6e312fcc6b2cd2238e7898ad50480

on June 14, 2013
at 08:25 PM

I know this question is ancient (and if you haven't cooked that heart by now you never will) but I need to share what I made for dinner tonight as it was also my first time cooking heart. Lamb heart, specifically. Most of the recipes I found involved slow-cooking it but I wasn't organised enough for that and wanted something quick. I'd read that heart can work quite well when quickly fried, so in the interests of making it as palatable as possible I sliced it up, dredged it in egg white and then a mix of coconut flour, paprika, salt and pepper, and fried it briefly in a butter-coconut oil mix. Served with onions, garlic and mixed greens also cooked in butter.

I'm still having mouthgasms.

Just... yum. I will DEFINITELY be buying heart again. The coconut flour 'breadcrumb' crust, while delicious, really wasn't needed as the heart flavour alone was lovely. And it's SO much cheaper, at least here in the UK, for good quality, well-sourced heart than it is for decent steak. I could buy four or five for the same price.

Hopefully this will encourage someone who has been on the fence to give it a go, it's seriously delicious stuff.

0
1887b8be9fc126710387e93d432559de

on November 07, 2012
at 07:51 PM

Human heart tastes the best, with a Tikka Masala or Korma sauce. I recommend using a heart from a female between the ages of 15 and 25 for the best tasting mature-but-not-over-matured flavour.

Really simple, just chop 4 into chunks and mix with the sauce when fried for 3 minutes a side, serve with rice of your choice.

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