3

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How do I make beef tallow?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 30, 2011 at 5:36 PM

I just got my quarter of grass fed beef and asked specifically for suet so I can make tallow.

Now I have the challenge of figuring out the best way of going about it.

Anybody make their own? Feel free to post links or videos that will help me out. I don't wanna mess this up!

Cheers!

166f449979d83186bd876e8f466d0a69

(1317)

on January 02, 2012
at 02:38 AM

it doesn't need to be kept in the fridge as a far as I know. where did you buy the tallow? some people do actually use it to make candles so make sure you've got the food-grade stuff!

2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on December 30, 2011
at 08:38 PM

i recently bought some tallow. it is very white and very hard. i had bought bacon fat the week before and it was a soft where, thus easier to scope out. the tallow is more like wax. is this how must people use it? should i not keep it in the refrigerator?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 30, 2011
at 06:22 PM

+1 did exactly the same, and used a paper coffee filter to clean out the remaining brown bits. After it went into the fridge it turned a nice yellowish/white. Yummy stuff.

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5 Answers

5
166f449979d83186bd876e8f466d0a69

(1317)

on December 30, 2011
at 05:39 PM

Mark's Daily Apple has a great post on this:

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-to-render-beef-tallow/#axzz1i2ZMWOyr

I made it last week. Froze the fat, chopped it up as finely as I could, chucked it in a pan on a very low heat and waited til the cracklings had gone brown, almost black (but not burnt!) and floated to the top. Easy peasy.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 30, 2011
at 06:22 PM

+1 did exactly the same, and used a paper coffee filter to clean out the remaining brown bits. After it went into the fridge it turned a nice yellowish/white. Yummy stuff.

2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on December 30, 2011
at 08:38 PM

i recently bought some tallow. it is very white and very hard. i had bought bacon fat the week before and it was a soft where, thus easier to scope out. the tallow is more like wax. is this how must people use it? should i not keep it in the refrigerator?

166f449979d83186bd876e8f466d0a69

(1317)

on January 02, 2012
at 02:38 AM

it doesn't need to be kept in the fridge as a far as I know. where did you buy the tallow? some people do actually use it to make candles so make sure you've got the food-grade stuff!

4
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on December 30, 2011
at 08:37 PM

A friend of mine made something like 3 gallons of tallow so that he could deep fry his turkey in it this Thanksgiving. Afterwards, he sent me this email about it:

  1. Toss anything that's not fat or mostly fat into a spare ziplock, for future soup stock use.

  2. Chop/blend all remaining fatty pieces in a food processor. This is best accomplished if these pieces are colder than room temp.

  3. Spoon blended "stuff" from food processor into crock pot. Cook below the temp at where the cracklins smell, but still at a temp that drives off moisture.

  4. After a few hours, spoon out cracklins, employing some method to wring out and save fat.

  5. Strain rest of fat. Collect and cool. Marvel at its almost fluorescent yellow color.

  6. Next time, just buy the already-rendered tallow. Honestly. Cool to know how to do, but way too time consuming.

1
A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on December 31, 2011
at 02:30 AM

Without any specific knowledge, I proceeded exactly the way I rendered pork lard: chopped fat (which I'd trimmed from short ribs and meaty shank bones (that I'd bought for soup marrow bones--hard to fine marrow bones all by themselves without lots of meat on them) into small dice, put in a sauce pan over low heat with some water, and simmer for several hours until all the water is gone, and the remains start to brown, and sink to the bottom. Strained through a cheese-cloth lined strainer into a mason jar. Upon chilling, it solidified into a pure-white solid. I haven't cooked anything in it, so don't know how it tastes. But I figured if I found it unpalatable, I'd make candles out of it instead, perhaps with some essential oils added in or something. Or perhaps soap, which I've never tried making, But basically, the technique for rendering pork lard worked exactly the same way for beef fat.

0
7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on December 31, 2011
at 04:25 AM

If you have any roasting meat or meaty bones in your quarter than you will get plenty by making a bone broth too. When I make marrow broth I just put it in a 7 quart crock pot on low for 2 days, strain through a cheese cloth then let all the fat settle to the top in the refrigerator to pull off. I store it in ball jars in the refrigerator and freezer. I suppose you could put your suet in with the bones. My only complaint is it gets so hard you've always got to soften it to get a good amount out.

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