2

votes

Favorite (and easiest) stock/bone broth recipe?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 19, 2011 at 4:18 PM

Howdy, hackers.

I've been making quite a bit of chicken stock lately (using this recipe, more or less: http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/2008/01/homemade-chicken-broth-crockpot-recipe.html), and foresee myself making more in the future, since I tend to make a chicken once a week, and besides that, have a good free source of bones from a local restaurant.

1- What's your favorite recipe for broth/stock/whatever the kids are calling it nowadays? I like my recipe- it's quick, fairly easy, makes good results- but if you have a KILLER recipe, or something specifically suited to another type of bone (beef, pork, etc), I'd love to hear it.

2- Some nights I'm pretty short on creativity- but want soup. Any favorite recipes out there for things to make with said stock?

2a- I tend to love "cream of" soups, and tolerate dairy pretty well overall. But sometimes I'm craving the creamy texture, and it's not a day where I can put up with any/any more dairy. Any favorite recipes with a similar texture- but no dairy? Coconut milk?

Fe33d1321dad116f6fedd60266d0498b

on September 22, 2011
at 04:41 AM

Fantastic answers! Thank you!

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on September 20, 2011
at 01:20 AM

Oh crap - I roast the carcasses and whatever bones when I do stock. Sorry! Forgot that part..

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on September 19, 2011
at 11:17 PM

You can use either. We use already cooked bones from other meals almost exclusively because we have them, so we may as well get some use out of them! I don't know how nutrition and flavor would be effected by using cooked vs. uncooked.

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on September 19, 2011
at 10:37 PM

Forgive me - I've never done this before. Do the bones need to be uncooked previously, or can I use bones that I take out of already-cooked roasts, such as lamb shanks?

Cd2d1fcf77345c9b2889ab56ecf5c842

(250)

on September 19, 2011
at 06:50 PM

Coconut cream (not coconut milk) works well in soups. My daughter-in-law is Vietnamese and she uses it in soups all the time!

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8 Answers

3
66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

on September 19, 2011
at 04:22 PM

AKD recently sent me this one using chicken feet that looks relatively easy.

http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_make_stock_from_chicken_feet/

2
C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

on September 20, 2011
at 02:10 AM

I save months of chicken bones and put them in my 8qt stock pot, add an onion, a couple stalks of celery, 2 whole carrots or 12 baby carrots, cover with water, add a sprig of parsley and 2-3 sprigs of thyme (out of my garden!) a bay leaf, and 8-12 peppercorns. Put the pot over LOW heat, as the trick is to get the barest of simmers, maybe 190 degrees. Then I skim it in the first hour and leave it on the heat overnight. in the morning I strain out the solids and, once it cools down to 140, drop in a zipper bag full of ice water to quickly cool it down. Then it's ready for staging in the fridge; usually I use it quickly but what I don't use I make individual portions of 1/2pt to 1pt and freeze them.

Sometimes i add tomato paste but it's not strictly necessary; tomato paste is better when you're making brown beef stock and you roast the paste on the bones in the oven before making stock.

If you want to make demiglace, once the solids are out you can turn up the heat to medium-high to high and really get the boil going.

2
B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on September 20, 2011
at 01:06 AM

Beef Stock

about 4 pounds beef marrow and knuckle bones; 1 calves foot, cut into pieces (optional); 3 pounds meaty rib or neck bones; 4 or more quarts cold filtered water; 1/2 cup vinegar; 3 onions, coarsely chopped; 3 carrots, coarsely chopped; 3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped; several sprigs of fresh thyme, tied together; 1 teaspoon dried green peppercorns, crushed; l bunch parsley

Place the knuckle and marrow bones and optional calves foot in a very large pot with vinegar and cover with water. Let stand for one hour. Meanwhile, place the meaty bones in a roasting pan and brown at 350 degrees in the oven. When well browned, add to the pot along with the vegetables. Pour the fat out of the roasting pan, add cold water to the pan, set over a high flame and bring to a boil, stirring with a wooden spoon to loosen up coagulated juices. Add this liquid to the pot. Add additional water, if necessary, to cover the bones; but the liquid should come no higher than within one inch of the rim of the pot, as the volume expands slightly during cooking. Bring to a boil. A large amount of scum will come to the top, and it is important to remove this with a spoon. After you have skimmed, reduce heat and add the thyme and crushed peppercorns.

Simmer stock for at least 12 and as long as 72 hours. Just before finishing, add the parsley and simmer another 10 minutes. You will now have a pot of rather repulsive-looking brown liquid containing globs of gelatinous and fatty material. It doesn't even smell particularly good. But don't despair. After straining you will have a delicious and nourishing clear broth that forms the basis for many other recipes in this book. Remove bones with tongs or a slotted spoon. Strain the stock into a large bowl. Let cool in the refrigerator and remove the congealed fat that rises to the top. Transfer to smaller containers and to the freezer for long-term storage.

Taken from http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/broth-is-beautiful

2
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 19, 2011
at 11:48 PM

I make a super simple curry soup with with bone broth. Broth, can of coconut milk, can of pumpkin puree, a spoonful of red curry paste. It seems to accept any veg/meat combination I put in it, and takes no time to make.

2
306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on September 19, 2011
at 10:19 PM

To make stock, I take bones (we save bones from several meals in the freezer until I have enough - sometimes we separate by species, sometimes not), throw them in the crock pot, cover with water, add a tablespoon or so of vinegar (this helps get minerals out of the bones, and doesn't really change the flavor), turn it on low and leave for overnight or longer. Sometimes I'll throw in an onion or veggie scraps or something, but for the most part I don't spice it while cooking, but leave it relatively neutral to be more versatile. I don't salt it for the same reason - I can always add salt later if I want to. Not really a killer recipe, but dead simple, and a good base for other things.

Zucchini, squash, and liver (cooked as desired, then pureed) can all add creaminess. You could probably do similar with other veggies. Or eggs - mix them up, then stir while adding so that they don't just cook up into a mass. If you have a high powered blender and the stock-making process has softened the bones enough, you can blend the bones themselves up for added creaminess (No one better question where my paleo kids get their calcium!). Instead of coconut milk, I've blended shredded coconut with broth then cooked for a while longer, and it turns out very well (coconut milk also works, but shredded coconut is cheaper).

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on September 19, 2011
at 10:37 PM

Forgive me - I've never done this before. Do the bones need to be uncooked previously, or can I use bones that I take out of already-cooked roasts, such as lamb shanks?

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on September 19, 2011
at 11:17 PM

You can use either. We use already cooked bones from other meals almost exclusively because we have them, so we may as well get some use out of them! I don't know how nutrition and flavor would be effected by using cooked vs. uncooked.

2
Bbc6e90e45ac205d0ebb544b8928f294

(100)

on September 19, 2011
at 09:30 PM

I usually just throw a couple of pounds of beef and/or lamb bones in a crock pot, cover with water and 1/4 cup vinegar, cook for 36 to 48 hours, strain, then make soup with whatever veggies and meat I have on hand -- boil everything for an hour on the stove. If refrigerated before use, the stock will have the consistency of jello with a nice layer of fat on top.

I've found it's not necessary to roast the bones beforehand, or skim anything off other than straining the stock at the end. Super easy!

My favorite soup is probably something like this:

1-2 lb chorizo or stew meat 1-2 onions celery bunch equal amount of carrots few potatoes cabbage head kale bunch paprika, garlic, pepper, salt to taste

Saute the meat and onions in coconut oil, then add chopped veggies and broth. Boil 1 hour, or until cooked to your liking.

Makes 6-8 quarts.

1
C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

on September 20, 2011
at 01:28 PM

The recipe you posted is too complicated for me, especially since I'm a big believer in not seasoning stock in any way, shape, or form! (That way, you don't have to worry about the flavors of the stock contradicting the flavors of the recipe it eventually ends up in.)

I basically throw a roasted chicken carcass in the crock pot with a couple of tbs of apple cider vinegar, a couple of carrots, a quartered onion (unpeeled, but organic!), and some celery, and water of course. During the summer, I usually only let it sit over night before I strain it and it makes a light stock. In fall and winter, I like a richer flavor, so I'll usually let it cook for two days.

Then, I cool it in the fridge, strain the stuff out and put it in containers to freeze, unless I'm using it right away.

One of my favorite soups is a riff on this sausage and kale soup from Everyday Food. I don't use the potatoes, and use a fresh sausage that I brown first, instead of a smoked one. Sometimes I'll top it with some grated parmesan, and I'm definitely liberal with the red pepper. (I also will use Schichimi Togarashi when I serve it, just for me and the husband, and leave it less spicy for the kids.)

1
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on September 19, 2011
at 10:11 PM

I've only made chicken stock, I can get beef/duck/pork stock from my butchers - chicken too but I like mine, and take the carcass + the bits and pieces, leek, onion, carrots, celery - included the leaves, herbs garlic, peppercorns, and put all that in about a quart of water, maybe two. Skim the top for about the first hour then simmer for the next 6-8 hours keeping an eye on the water level to make sure everything stays covered. Strain. Done.

Recipes: Avgolemono without rice. If you want the texture use finely chopped cauliflower. The base for Chowder - I use plain mashed potato to give it texture. Same thing for a mushroom soup. I'll cook down a bunch of celery, carrot, potato, onion, puree and add back in for an extra veggie boost + the thickening effects. Tom Ka Kai or any Thai soups are super easy to put together, nice and spicy (or not spicy). I use Red Boat fish sauce when I do those. Umm.. and probably Pozole - just omit the hominy and use firm potato. Or eat the hominy as a treat :)

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on September 20, 2011
at 01:20 AM

Oh crap - I roast the carcasses and whatever bones when I do stock. Sorry! Forgot that part..

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