3

votes

Best Recipe for Chicken Breast (any way to get to taste like GF Beef?)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 31, 2011 at 10:54 PM

I generally do not like chicken breast as I find it to be a very dry meat, but unfortunately my dad works for a poultry farm and I can get it at an extremely cheap price. I don't have the economic means to eat more GF beef. Typically I've baked it in the oven with some simple Portuguese style wine and garlic for flavoring and seasoning, but I find this method is getting old. I usually make enough for the week and warm it up as I go, which makes it even more dry at times. Suggestions? What is your best recipe for Chicken Breast?

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on January 06, 2012
at 02:34 PM

Koshering the bird with sea salt will have even more outstanding effect, if you don't worry about salt too much. I butterfly whole birds, heavily salt them on both sides, then place them on a rack with a pan underneath to catch the water and blood that comes out... for two days or so. Then, I rinse the bird, put herb butter under the skin and bake on top of old veggies (I don't eat the old veggies, I might use the pan drippings for sauce, and that's the best use of wilted celery, carrots, and onion skins/tops).

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 02, 2012
at 11:22 AM

Totally thought that said "GF beer" at first. I am now greatly considering marinating some chicken in gluten free beer.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 01, 2012
at 10:28 PM

And I don't do it for 3 days, one day has been good enough for me.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 01, 2012
at 10:28 PM

The drying out allows the skin to be crispy. I do the same but I bake it hotter and don't add butter. If you insist on butter, I'd add it after baking, the skin has enough fat to cook well.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 01, 2012
at 10:26 PM

Tom Kha Gai is the name of the soup. I love it, and I do the same thing. Buy the soup pre-made, throw in tons of veggies, and cubed chicken breast.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 01, 2012
at 10:25 PM

Agree. Chicken breast gets a bad rap only because it's very easy to miss 'moist' and arrive at 'dry'. You have more leeway with steak. Aim for rare and it won't be overcooked.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 01, 2012
at 07:47 PM

Yeah, FED, I love your recipes!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 01, 2012
at 06:47 PM

Wow! I've GOT to try this!

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on January 01, 2012
at 02:30 PM

Wrap in bacon, sprikle favorite spice and either grill or bake on high heat. Fast. It doesn't taste like GF beef but it's pretty awesome.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on January 01, 2012
at 08:48 AM

If your chicken breast is dry then it is overcooked.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 01, 2012
at 04:58 AM

And sorry, you can't make chicken taste like beef :P It's a completely different meat. Maybe cook it with soy sauce or coconut aminos? Maybe cook it in beef stock?

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13 Answers

4
D5a4ff096a452a84a772efa0e6bc626e

(2486)

on December 31, 2011
at 11:10 PM

Lean meat needs lots of fat, to me. I like chicken breast in a Thai-esque soup based in coconut milk with ginger, mushrooms, bamboo shoots, perhaps sweet potato if you eat it.

I also like poached chicken breast diced with avocado, finely chopped onions, and spices to replicate a more traditional chicken salad.

Finally, I'll poach the breasts- being careful to poach at a low temperature for the minimum time in order to keep them moist- in green tomatillo salsa or perhaps red salsa. Shred, mix back with cooking salsa, serve as a taco salad, again with avocado.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 01, 2012
at 10:26 PM

Tom Kha Gai is the name of the soup. I love it, and I do the same thing. Buy the soup pre-made, throw in tons of veggies, and cubed chicken breast.

4
07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on December 31, 2011
at 10:56 PM

I've got some grass fed tallow that I melt in my cast iron pan, brown the chicken on one side, then flip it and put the cover on until it's done. Usually turns out pretty moist, and the beef fat gives it a nice flavor.

3
Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

on January 01, 2012
at 08:14 AM

in the middle ages the king would have his fresh pheasant(not peasant) hung from a tree for days befor cooking because magic happend and the bird became fit for a king. here is my paleo secret baked chicken recipe. i should not be sharing it, but here is my rendition. bring home the whole plastic bagged chicken, remove the wrapper and put it on a plate to dry out in the refrigerator for 3 days. after three days the skin should be getting translucent, rub the skin with butter and season the bird. bake at 375 for one hour and forty five minutes. you now have a roast bird that is moist and falling away from the bone, and the skin is crispy crunchy. fit for any paleo king. i promise its the best chicken ever baked. i eat mine with sauteed butternut squash.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 01, 2012
at 10:28 PM

The drying out allows the skin to be crispy. I do the same but I bake it hotter and don't add butter. If you insist on butter, I'd add it after baking, the skin has enough fat to cook well.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 01, 2012
at 10:28 PM

And I don't do it for 3 days, one day has been good enough for me.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 01, 2012
at 06:47 PM

Wow! I've GOT to try this!

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on January 06, 2012
at 02:34 PM

Koshering the bird with sea salt will have even more outstanding effect, if you don't worry about salt too much. I butterfly whole birds, heavily salt them on both sides, then place them on a rack with a pan underneath to catch the water and blood that comes out... for two days or so. Then, I rinse the bird, put herb butter under the skin and bake on top of old veggies (I don't eat the old veggies, I might use the pan drippings for sauce, and that's the best use of wilted celery, carrots, and onion skins/tops).

3
D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on December 31, 2011
at 11:00 PM

Do you ever brine it? That would help. Another good investment would be an instead read thermometer, since it's so easy to overcook chicken. You can also wrap it in bacon. I like bacon wrapped chicken roasted on top of cabbage.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on January 01, 2012
at 02:30 PM

Wrap in bacon, sprikle favorite spice and either grill or bake on high heat. Fast. It doesn't taste like GF beef but it's pretty awesome.

2
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 01, 2012
at 12:53 AM

Flippant answer: Find someone with a great source of GF beef and trade with them so you each have some of each.

I'm not a great fan of chicken breast either. I usually cut it into chunks and stew it with either beef or poultry bones or both. If there isn't a good quantity of fat in the pot I add fatty beef or bacon for balance.

I also like seasoning the chicken chunks with turmeric and making an omelet with plenty of butter. Salsa is also good if you don't like turmeric.

2
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on December 31, 2011
at 11:18 PM

Primarily I poach my chicken breasts and then shred, cube, slice. Just simply added to broth with aromatics, etc., and they're always nice and juicy.

My other method is one that was shared with me and is so easy and so good and no fail. A super quick roast at 450 with different seasonings. So on one pan I'll have six breasts and two will be salt/pepper, two curry, two with sumac, or garlic, onion - whatever I grab. They're always nice and juicy. Internal temp should read about 160 to 165 degrees.

If I can recommend anything, a meat thermometer is a great tool. Also making sure your chicken rests for about 5 minutes so all the goodness stays inside.

1
Medium avatar

(19479)

on January 01, 2012
at 07:44 PM

I'm not big into breasts either, which is why I find the need to do some serious doctoring to make them palatable.

For example, wrapping them in bacon and stuffing them with cheese...

best-recipe-for-chicken-breast-(any-way-to-get-to-taste-like-gf-beef?)

(full recipe here)

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 01, 2012
at 07:47 PM

Yeah, FED, I love your recipes!

1
1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on January 01, 2012
at 06:41 PM

Marinate the chicken breasts in: 1/4 cup olive oil and about the same amt of soy sauce or tamari or coconut aminos, a big splash of balsamic vinegar, a few cloves of garlic, sliced or smashed, and some rosemary. Leave for 2 or more hours, and then bake at 400 for 20-30 min. You can bake it with or without the marinade liquid included. I never tire of this.

Also, if you have a slow cooker, there's nothing easier than throwing in chicken breasts, and a jar of salsa for a few hours. Excellent taste and juicy meat; great over greens or with vegs.

I don't think you'll ever make it taste like beef....but enjoy your chicken!!

1
19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 01, 2012
at 04:55 AM

Sorry, you can't make chicken taste like beef :P It's a completely different meat. Maybe cook it with soy sauce or coconut aminos? Maybe cook it in beef stock?

I'm actually thinking about this because I accidentally ordered too much chicken and too little beef this month. Big mistake!

If you make a curry, the meat doesn't go dry. Specially if you're cooking lots of it for the week, it's the best way to prevent it from getting dry, I think.

How about a kale soup with chicken? Maybe you like this soup with shredded chicken in it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caldo_verde
Since this soup has chorizo on it, it will taste less chickeny (I should know, I cook it that way, and I also hate chicken)

Or a chicken egg drop soup?
Bring chicken stock to a boil, then turn off the heat. Add shredded chicken. Whisk a couple eggs in a bowl with salt and pepper, and some of the stock. Then drizzle this into the pot, stirring with the fork. Quick and easy, super moist chicken.
Maybe if you make this with homemade beef stock, the chicken will turn out tasting beefy? If you try it, let us know.

I think anything wet will keep the chicken moist, as long as it's not overcooked.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 01, 2012
at 04:58 AM

And sorry, you can't make chicken taste like beef :P It's a completely different meat. Maybe cook it with soy sauce or coconut aminos? Maybe cook it in beef stock?

0
A048b66e08306d405986b6c04bf5e8e4

on March 23, 2013
at 03:10 AM

I find that if I de-bone the chicken breasts and fry/bake them with coconut oil and whatever seasoning strikes my fancy, they turn out great. The trick is to not leave them in the oven (or whatever method you're cooking them with) too long.

0
A1774fb1fcb6c7a072a5e424544ef62e

(255)

on January 02, 2012
at 06:17 AM

This must sound awfully immodest of me, lol, but I like to think I became quite the expert on cooking chicken breast during my low-carb stint, before I adopted a more "Paleo" way of eating (i.e. choosing meats higher in fat) :D I still enjoy chicken breast done this way, though!

Recipe for garlic and thyme chicken breast en papillote

In order to keep the chicken moist, I bake it in a 'bag' made from tin foil (the "en papillote"-style). I season the chicken breast (roughly 300g) with salt and pepper, then rub minced garlic (roughly 1-2 cloves per 300g breast) and chopped fresh thyme (3 sprigs) on both sides. Then I roll the breast up into a neat mound, and use tin foil to form a package around it.

Then it's into the fridge for an hour or so to marinate. When I'm ready to bake it, I pre-heat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius (400 degrees Fahrenheit). For 300g, the baking time is usually 42-45 minutes. When it's done baking, take it out of the oven and let it rest in the sealed package for 15 minutes. This step is important, as it allows the meat to reabsorb some of the moisture that have come out during cooking. Slice, and serve with your favourite sides.

This recipe guarantees moist, succulent chicken breast every time. Enjoy! :D

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 02, 2012
at 05:10 AM

Being on a PSMF, and having chicken breast as an inexpensive and low fat option, I can totally relate. I love buffalo wings, so I cook my breasts until they are mostly done and then add a combo of Sriracha pepper sauce and Tabasco. Let it finish up on low heat with that. Good stuff!!!

0
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on December 31, 2011
at 11:19 PM

My go-to method for disposing of white meat is to cook it up with scrambled eggs and veggies. Add more fat than you normally would for the eggs and let the meat soak it up before adding everything else. You get a lot of fat and flavor added to the meat.

If you were to bake/broil/grill the breasts be sure to avoid over cooking. Get a probe meat thermometer and nail the perfect temperature. I go with 155 then let the residual heat raise it to 160.

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