3

votes

In the regards to bleu cheeses.

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 09, 2012 at 12:24 AM

So I understand the thin line with dairy and paleo. (if you're hardcore dairy is blasphemy.) but whats the deal with types of cheeses that are okay. I have a recipe ready using pears, roquefort, and almonds but was curious if bleu cheeses are out of the question.

For those who don't know rouquefort is essentially sheep milk's blue cheese.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 10, 2012
at 09:59 AM

Totally agree on the casein - I have no issues with goat milk, but do with all cow products, including fermented ones that I let ferment for over 24h to remove all the lactose. All lactose does for me is cause some mild flatulence, where any cow dairy, even fermented causes me acid reflux issues.

45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on August 09, 2012
at 06:07 PM

It's the casein, not the lactose, which gives some of us so much trouble.

45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on August 09, 2012
at 06:06 PM

Sorry about any confusion. I don't eat dairy products at all. My body does not handle them at all. I am not saying that no one should eat them. Cheese is embraced by some and not by all as an appropriate inclusion in a Paleo diet; I'm pretty sure we could agree on that.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:31 PM

I don't think roquefort qualifies as a dead food, any more than my live-culture homemade yogurt. If deadness is now a criterion for whether a food is real, maybe we should give up eating dead animals and dead plants too.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:59 PM

What about white rind cheeses, where the mold is essentially penicillin? These should improve autoimmune conditions.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:58 PM

That's what I was thinking- I seem to tolerate small amounts on occasion but a lot of folks might not even realize bleu cheeses could have gluten.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:56 PM

Cheesemaking almost completely eliminates the lactose with the whey. My grandpa used to drink the greenish stuff, but I always thought it was better to feed it to pigs. If you've ever tried making cheese, it's disappointing how little curd you get for the volume of milk used. True ricottas - where you coagulate the remaining protein out of the whey - are extremely low yield.

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:47 PM

If the cheese is pasteurized it doesn't offer any live cultures or active enzymes. It's not going to be a negative if you can tolerate it, but at the same time, it's not doing you any benefits either. In a way it's a "dead food." Maybe that's what was meant by it not being food. Raw, unpasteurized cheese is a different story. Digestive issues aside, it can be very nutritious.

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on August 09, 2012
at 04:55 AM

I agree; blue cheese makes me feel terrible, but I still think it's food. For others.

F2c347d7525967f66644a12266639b96

on August 09, 2012
at 03:51 AM

Yeah, this is true. Luckily I live in California, so being able to get organic cheese isn't a problem.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:45 AM

Please explain how cheese isn't food.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:42 AM

While some starters are from bread, there are some non bread based starter cultures. It will depend on the cheesemaker.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:23 AM

I thought it was cows milk, but whatever.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:21 AM

Confronted with Cheetos I don't think our ancestors would have any second thoughts about eating them. They gorged on carbs as well as fats, and they would have killed for a piece of roquefort. Literally. Cheese is veal once-removed.

F2c347d7525967f66644a12266639b96

on August 09, 2012
at 12:57 AM

Interesting, I was curious because my blog isn't necessarily trying to stick with the diet but rather the philosophy. Just was curious if it was on level of using grains or legumes.

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8 Answers

best answer

6
7f4b697070907f7d7c969d2ebc99838b

on August 09, 2012
at 01:14 AM

Depends on you! If you feel ok after eating blue cheese, I would say go for it as a treat! If you feel terrible after eating it obviously I would mostly avoid. Paleo is a template!!!

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on August 09, 2012
at 04:55 AM

I agree; blue cheese makes me feel terrible, but I still think it's food. For others.

best answer

4
Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:12 AM

They come from caves. That qualifies them as at least paleo-simpatico.

High protein, high fat, and coagulated with part of a cow. This is better for you than so-called "paleo" vitamin pills and fish oil capsules manufactured in dark satanic mills.

My this Cahors is good tonight. I can see the stars and it's not even dark. I wish I had some of that cheese to go with it.

2
91119f53c3827f5c7fc90b98cab85b04

(799)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:51 PM

Blue-veined cheeses contain strains of mold and should be avoided by anyone trying to manage an autoimmune condition (leaky gut, candida, eczema, psoriasis and other autoimmune conditions will be exacerbated by these cheeses). Other than that, I don't make it a staple but do enjoy a bit on occasion without any noticeable ill-effects.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:59 PM

What about white rind cheeses, where the mold is essentially penicillin? These should improve autoimmune conditions.

2
3ab5e1b9eba22a071f653330b7fc9579

on August 09, 2012
at 11:36 AM

Here is an article about cheese. We stick to grass fed and well aged cheeses, but really it is only a problem if it bothers you.

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/cheese-unhealthy/#axzz2332FiEn5

2
Medium avatar

(3213)

on August 09, 2012
at 12:53 AM

I would say, go for it!

I don't see what adverse effect could a small amount of good quality sheep's milk cheese, have on your diet.

1
Medium avatar

(4878)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:30 AM

For me it isn't about the dairy, it is about the wheat used to start the yummy mold...

F2c347d7525967f66644a12266639b96

on August 09, 2012
at 03:51 AM

Yeah, this is true. Luckily I live in California, so being able to get organic cheese isn't a problem.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:42 AM

While some starters are from bread, there are some non bread based starter cultures. It will depend on the cheesemaker.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:58 PM

That's what I was thinking- I seem to tolerate small amounts on occasion but a lot of folks might not even realize bleu cheeses could have gluten.

0
Ba99a15e6bf870b81286791617050593

(671)

on August 09, 2012
at 12:49 PM

One of the biggest complaints with dairy is the amount of lactose. As others have said, it depends on your tolerance level of lactose. The other is iffy as full on dairy allergies - in this case likely to casein or whey.

You almost needn't worry about whey or casein because those are mostly discarded in the cheese making process, along with a large percentage of the lactose as well: http://cheese.about.com/od/cheesebasics/f/lactose_free.htm

As for the remaining lactose in cheese, blue has one of the lowest: http://www.stevecarper.com/li/list_of_lactose_percentages.htm

Not to mention it's also the most delicious. If you can find Gabriel Coulet Roquefort in your area, every little morsel is worth the hefty price tag.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:56 PM

Cheesemaking almost completely eliminates the lactose with the whey. My grandpa used to drink the greenish stuff, but I always thought it was better to feed it to pigs. If you've ever tried making cheese, it's disappointing how little curd you get for the volume of milk used. True ricottas - where you coagulate the remaining protein out of the whey - are extremely low yield.

45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on August 09, 2012
at 06:07 PM

It's the casein, not the lactose, which gives some of us so much trouble.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 10, 2012
at 09:59 AM

Totally agree on the casein - I have no issues with goat milk, but do with all cow products, including fermented ones that I let ferment for over 24h to remove all the lactose. All lactose does for me is cause some mild flatulence, where any cow dairy, even fermented causes me acid reflux issues.

0
45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on August 09, 2012
at 12:39 AM

That simply depends on who you ask. I, personally, avoid all dairy products, though I most certainly miss a really good blue cheese. I don't think it's food. Others will say go for it.

F2c347d7525967f66644a12266639b96

on August 09, 2012
at 12:57 AM

Interesting, I was curious because my blog isn't necessarily trying to stick with the diet but rather the philosophy. Just was curious if it was on level of using grains or legumes.

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:47 PM

If the cheese is pasteurized it doesn't offer any live cultures or active enzymes. It's not going to be a negative if you can tolerate it, but at the same time, it's not doing you any benefits either. In a way it's a "dead food." Maybe that's what was meant by it not being food. Raw, unpasteurized cheese is a different story. Digestive issues aside, it can be very nutritious.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:21 AM

Confronted with Cheetos I don't think our ancestors would have any second thoughts about eating them. They gorged on carbs as well as fats, and they would have killed for a piece of roquefort. Literally. Cheese is veal once-removed.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:45 AM

Please explain how cheese isn't food.

45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on August 09, 2012
at 06:06 PM

Sorry about any confusion. I don't eat dairy products at all. My body does not handle them at all. I am not saying that no one should eat them. Cheese is embraced by some and not by all as an appropriate inclusion in a Paleo diet; I'm pretty sure we could agree on that.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 09, 2012
at 02:31 PM

I don't think roquefort qualifies as a dead food, any more than my live-culture homemade yogurt. If deadness is now a criterion for whether a food is real, maybe we should give up eating dead animals and dead plants too.

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