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Do you have a good recipe for beef tongue?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 20, 2013 at 10:07 PM

It stares at me every time I open the freezer, passing it by for something more obviously enjoyable. I have decided to face it and try it out. I know I recently read some article in the paleosphere about a delicious tongue recipe, but I don't remember where. What do you do with your tongue?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 21, 2013
at 02:24 PM

I put ACV in braises for the acid but hadn't thought to add it to things afterward. Sounds good though, I imagine it would impart a slight sweetness... ?

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 21, 2013
at 02:20 PM

Mushrooms and lemon! Great idea -- I'll sometimes splash in some ACV for the acid, lemon would work beautifully as well. And agreed, the hash is best when it crisps up.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 21, 2013
at 01:58 PM

By the way, if you like beef, and particularly the flavour and texture of fatty cuts of meat in general, you will likely enjoy the flavour of the tongue. You might have to 'face it' but there is not really anything to be afraid off/any reason for there to be stigma associated with it. (Although stigma isn't really reasonable is it lol...)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 21, 2013
at 01:56 PM

There is a pun waiting to be made there but alas I am not the person to do it ;)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 21, 2013
at 01:55 PM

Me too, on all 3 counts! Salt, lemon and fatty beef- sometimes one couldn't ask for anything more...

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 21, 2013
at 01:47 PM

@UncleLongHair and Tamanduá - maybe roasting, even at medium heat, renders some of the fat out relative to when it's boiled/braised/simmered...? The fat could well be in the sauce you mentioned in your post.. It's always been a fatty muscle cut to me, particularly if eaten after boiling. If I saute onions or something with pieces of tongue, the a lot of fat comes out of the tongue and helps make the textures and tastes very pleasurable...

D9e4b265ef308c8cabf847559fd8be2e

(370)

on February 21, 2013
at 12:14 PM

Yes, it appears lean because of the even fat distribution, but 100g contains 22g fat and 19g protein.

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on February 21, 2013
at 10:59 AM

This is similar to how I deal with a lot of meat. Thanks for the recipe.

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on February 21, 2013
at 10:57 AM

Thanks for the link!

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on February 21, 2013
at 03:13 AM

Then plan on braising it forever (3+ hrs) or using the crock pot. Think about it -- what muscle from a mammal is used more than a cow's chewing muscle?

04a4f204bc2e589fa30fd31b92944549

(975)

on February 21, 2013
at 03:09 AM

Aw man I dont have a pressure cooker..

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on February 21, 2013
at 03:04 AM

IMHO tongue is actually quite lean, no fat.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on February 21, 2013
at 03:03 AM

Beef cheeks can be VERY tough, might need to braise those for hours, or use a pressure cooker. I recently made them braised for 2 hours and they were still tough.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 21, 2013
at 01:05 AM

Oh, I meant the recipe itself is simple/basic. Not a lot going on, but it makes for a very tender tongue.

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on February 20, 2013
at 11:45 PM

Thank you for the recipe. Is it basic like I think of heart as basic?

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9 Answers

2
D9e4b265ef308c8cabf847559fd8be2e

on February 21, 2013
at 12:18 AM

Tongue is a great fatty meat to have on hand. I have been using smoked bison tongues. The smoked style gives a bacon-like flavor. It's very good w/ horseradish. I store it whole in it's cooking water in the fridge and slice off pieces as needed. It is good cold or warm.

I often eat it w/ eggs or use it to "meat up" greens. I take cold slices to work for lunch. It's fun to see people react when they find out what it is.

As for cooking it, it takes time. It is generally simmered or braised. But I use a pressure cooker for 1 hr. w/ onions, salt and pepper, thyme...Then you need to let it cool a bit and remove the tough skin that surrounds the meat and it's ready to use.

The beef tongues can be quite a bit bigger than bison so cooking will take a bit longer.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 21, 2013
at 01:47 PM

@UncleLongHair and Tamanduá - maybe roasting, even at medium heat, renders some of the fat out relative to when it's boiled/braised/simmered...? The fat could well be in the sauce you mentioned in your post.. It's always been a fatty muscle cut to me, particularly if eaten after boiling. If I saute onions or something with pieces of tongue, the a lot of fat comes out of the tongue and helps make the textures and tastes very pleasurable...

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on February 21, 2013
at 03:04 AM

IMHO tongue is actually quite lean, no fat.

D9e4b265ef308c8cabf847559fd8be2e

(370)

on February 21, 2013
at 12:14 PM

Yes, it appears lean because of the even fat distribution, but 100g contains 22g fat and 19g protein.

1
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on February 21, 2013
at 01:53 PM

I generally just boil it for a while with aromatics etc, then post peeling eat with lemon and salt. The lemon cuts the fattiness very nicely and saltiness for me always = win.

I use it for leftovers too - I like to fry slices so that the fat renders out then lubricates onions, or is absorbed by crimini type mushrooms, with or without herbs like rosemary, or spices. Sometimes if done in a conducive way (relatively medium/high heat for a while or a lower heat for a lot longer), the pieces will crisp up and have a 'crust' ala seared steaks.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 21, 2013
at 02:24 PM

I put ACV in braises for the acid but hadn't thought to add it to things afterward. Sounds good though, I imagine it would impart a slight sweetness... ?

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 21, 2013
at 02:20 PM

Mushrooms and lemon! Great idea -- I'll sometimes splash in some ACV for the acid, lemon would work beautifully as well. And agreed, the hash is best when it crisps up.

1
0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

on February 21, 2013
at 01:27 PM

I keep it simple: a crockpot braise with sliced onion, garlic, peppercorns and bay leaves.

I'm the only one who eats it, so I also get to play with the leftovers -- my favorite is to shred the heck out of it, heat some fat in a skillet and make tongue hash. Serve with eggs or marrow -- delish.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 21, 2013
at 01:55 PM

Me too, on all 3 counts! Salt, lemon and fatty beef- sometimes one couldn't ask for anything more...

1
44f0901d5b0e85d8b00315c892d00f8a

on February 21, 2013
at 09:21 AM

Hope below link helps you to create delicious tongue recipe. http://www.primal-palate.com/2011/08/beef-tongue-taco-bites.html

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on February 21, 2013
at 10:57 AM

Thanks for the link!

1
4610451431ec7155c87a5698be682a95

(1122)

on February 21, 2013
at 04:03 AM

Trad. Mexican joints make delicious use of tongue. I'd slow cook in some sort of chili sauce. Good luck on taming that wicked looking cut!

1
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on February 21, 2013
at 03:10 AM

I actually really like tongue (ok stop giggling). My go-to recipe is, saut?? bacon, add mirepoix, cook a few minutes, add tongue, add enough stock / broth / wine to come 2/3 up the tongue, cover, cook in the oven at 325 for about 90 minutes. Remove the tongue and peel it, the tough out skin comes off with a sharp knife (bit of a hassle but not terrible).

You are left with a fully cooked, tender, mildly flavored and lean strip of meat. At this point I usually reduce the cooking liquid by half, adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, slice the tongue, return it to the sauce and serve.

The same thing can be done with Asian spices (ginger, soy, cabbage).

It is hard to overcook and is basically mildly flavored. There is definitely a somewhat unusual, spongy texture that some people don't love. You can avoid that by slicing it thin and even frying the slices before serving if you want.

Sometimes the tongue will come with a tough, gristly piece of meat at the "root". This is ok to eat if braised and sliced, but doesn't have the same uniform, smooth texture as the main part of the tongue. If your guests are new to tongue you might omit that or cook that and then set it aside for your own use later.

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on February 21, 2013
at 10:59 AM

This is similar to how I deal with a lot of meat. Thanks for the recipe.

1
04a4f204bc2e589fa30fd31b92944549

(975)

on February 20, 2013
at 10:40 PM

I'm wondering the same thing about beef cheeks, which I found at a mexican market

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on February 21, 2013
at 03:13 AM

Then plan on braising it forever (3+ hrs) or using the crock pot. Think about it -- what muscle from a mammal is used more than a cow's chewing muscle?

04a4f204bc2e589fa30fd31b92944549

(975)

on February 21, 2013
at 03:09 AM

Aw man I dont have a pressure cooker..

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on February 21, 2013
at 03:03 AM

Beef cheeks can be VERY tough, might need to braise those for hours, or use a pressure cooker. I recently made them braised for 2 hours and they were still tough.

1
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on February 20, 2013
at 10:21 PM

My grandpa used to make a recipe very similar to this (his "recipe" was always a little of this and a little of that): http://www.wasabibratwurst.com/pickled-tongue/ Instead of sugar, he used sorghum.

This is my go-to recipe: http://randsco.com/index.php/2012/05/28/pickled_tongue_recipe

I've only ever had tongue pickled.

1
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 20, 2013
at 10:13 PM

Thaw it out.

Crockpot. Add the tongue. Chop an onion into quarters, toss in. Add a bit of salt and black peppr. Add one bay leaf. Add enough water or broth to cover the tongue. Cook on low for 8ish hours.

When it's done, cut the tongue in half (or pull the skin off one side), and shred the tongue with a fork. Use the meat as is immediately, or cook into other dishes later, and flavor as desired.

The basic recipe is so simple, and it makes an amazing (though basic) meat that can be included in many dishes.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 21, 2013
at 01:05 AM

Oh, I meant the recipe itself is simple/basic. Not a lot going on, but it makes for a very tender tongue.

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on February 20, 2013
at 11:45 PM

Thank you for the recipe. Is it basic like I think of heart as basic?

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