8

votes

Best starting offal

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 13, 2010 at 1:33 PM

What do you consider the most friendly offal for someone who has never eaten it before? Please consider adding a simple recipe for its preparation. Thanks!

3eb3f79868b24b3df4450ea2d4f9a5d5

(2387)

on September 15, 2010
at 08:25 AM

Oh wow, man, blood sausage, one of those German (British?) meals that are purely, utterly awesome. Roasted blood sausage, with apple puree (!), roasted onions and, if you like, mashed suqash. This combination is called "Himmel un Ääd" in the Rheinland region of Germany. Melissa,thank you for reminding me of that.

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on September 14, 2010
at 09:44 PM

ooooh, that sounds wonderful!

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on September 14, 2010
at 09:43 PM

You might want to consider using ghee for extra fat and ooomph! instead of butter.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 27, 2010
at 09:26 PM

I have my butcher and pork farmers (one of my farmers does paleo himself) make it without flour. Boudin noir doesn't usually contain it anyway. In Sweden all their blood puddings had flour AND sugar...yuck.

D2f68674c2d09d1c63fa3d8628744a6b

on March 26, 2010
at 07:54 PM

Agreed. You can also add bacon to add to the accessibility, because bacon is the gateway meat for so many vegetarians, maybe it can be the gateway seasoning to offal for newcomers? Also, if you consider heart to be offal (controversy), it might be a good choice, as it tastes like extra beefy beef.

33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on March 26, 2010
at 07:34 PM

sounds gorgeous!

78ecfc8268ec58cdc189301f4b071088

(1670)

on March 26, 2010
at 02:51 PM

I live in Argentina and the Sweatbreads here are common, and amazing. You will become addicted to Sweatbreads in seconds. Separate but related, Argentina is (bizarrely!) a paleo paradise: a primarily meat-eating culture, many organs cooked at almost every restaurant, it's amazing. My latest discovery: "sesos" (brains)!

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 26, 2010
at 12:04 PM

At fiesta time, the Mexican workers would buy a live goat, slaughter it and fill the intestines with the blood and would place the blood sack in the animal cavity and cook the entire animal all day, head and all, in a firepit fueled with citrus wood..All covered with banana tree leaves. The blood was mixed with jalapeno and serrano peppers and spices of unknown origin...Blood sausage was hot enough to break out in a sweat...but delicious.

52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on February 14, 2010
at 04:23 PM

This appeals to me. I will be on the lookout for quality chicken livers. Thanks, David.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 14, 2010
at 10:37 AM

I vouch for sweetbreads too. Tried them first in a restaurant and then bought a kilogram from the butchers. People suggest quite a laborious preparation process of soaking, blanching, boiling and then cooking... but mine turned out great with minimal soaking and then peeling the skins off and frying. Couldn't find stats anywhere, but I suspect they're uber-nutritious.

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on February 14, 2010
at 06:04 AM

Beef liver has a stonger taste which is why I thought it might be better to start with chicken livers.

52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on February 13, 2010
at 07:39 PM

Voted up for recommending something I can get at a restaurant. Thanks!

7f8d633c32b75ad7f9f148ceb6283866

(315)

on February 13, 2010
at 06:33 PM

any reason why this wouldn't work with beef liver?

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11 Answers

best answer

7
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 13, 2010
at 04:01 PM

Chicken liver pate (sounds much more grand than it need be). Fry chicken livers in a very large quantity of butter (with whatever shallots, garlic, herbs, spices, liquer you like) until golden brown. Then pulverise in a blender until it's as smooth /coarse as you like.

Possibly the most nutritious single food you can imagine (being mostly liver) and you can make it pretty lean/intensely calorific to fit your needs depending on how much butter you care to add. The more you brown the livers, the less 'livery' and more 'meaty' they'll taste.

52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on February 14, 2010
at 04:23 PM

This appeals to me. I will be on the lookout for quality chicken livers. Thanks, David.

D2f68674c2d09d1c63fa3d8628744a6b

on March 26, 2010
at 07:54 PM

Agreed. You can also add bacon to add to the accessibility, because bacon is the gateway meat for so many vegetarians, maybe it can be the gateway seasoning to offal for newcomers? Also, if you consider heart to be offal (controversy), it might be a good choice, as it tastes like extra beefy beef.

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on September 14, 2010
at 09:43 PM

You might want to consider using ghee for extra fat and ooomph! instead of butter.

5
93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on February 13, 2010
at 06:27 PM

If you have a chance, try "sweet breads" (thymus gland of the cow) at an Argentine steakhouse. They are called "mollejas". Delicious and light-tasting.

Pic here:

http://www.asadoargentina.com/veal-sweetbreads-mollejas-de-ternera/

52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on February 13, 2010
at 07:39 PM

Voted up for recommending something I can get at a restaurant. Thanks!

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 14, 2010
at 10:37 AM

I vouch for sweetbreads too. Tried them first in a restaurant and then bought a kilogram from the butchers. People suggest quite a laborious preparation process of soaking, blanching, boiling and then cooking... but mine turned out great with minimal soaking and then peeling the skins off and frying. Couldn't find stats anywhere, but I suspect they're uber-nutritious.

78ecfc8268ec58cdc189301f4b071088

(1670)

on March 26, 2010
at 02:51 PM

I live in Argentina and the Sweatbreads here are common, and amazing. You will become addicted to Sweatbreads in seconds. Separate but related, Argentina is (bizarrely!) a paleo paradise: a primarily meat-eating culture, many organs cooked at almost every restaurant, it's amazing. My latest discovery: "sesos" (brains)!

4
33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on March 26, 2010
at 10:10 AM

Blood sausage - it is sweet and soft and very friendly! It cooks very easily, just like a regular sausage, (put it on the oven for 15-20 minutes) I would class it as offal, but you would be fooled into thinking that it was not.

It is called boudin noir in France and black pudding in the UK. Here is some more info on blood sausages around the world, they turn up in practically every country's cuisine.

Seems a shame to waste all that blood....

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 26, 2010
at 12:04 PM

At fiesta time, the Mexican workers would buy a live goat, slaughter it and fill the intestines with the blood and would place the blood sack in the animal cavity and cook the entire animal all day, head and all, in a firepit fueled with citrus wood..All covered with banana tree leaves. The blood was mixed with jalapeno and serrano peppers and spices of unknown origin...Blood sausage was hot enough to break out in a sweat...but delicious.

33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on March 26, 2010
at 07:34 PM

sounds gorgeous!

3
E4b155f898e209391902792ec3c005f3

(220)

on February 16, 2010
at 10:33 PM

For some reason, chicken livers at Whole Foods are the cheapest meat in the entire store. I wrap each one in a strip of bacon, pin it together with a toothpick, then broil a pan full.

3
7f8d633c32b75ad7f9f148ceb6283866

(315)

on February 13, 2010
at 06:23 PM

Heart ground up (food processor) with ground beef makes good hamburgers.

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 13, 2010
at 03:39 PM

I found the recipe on http://www.paleonu.com/panu-weblog/2009/11/13/what-i-eat.html#comment6598048 .

Kurt et al,Regarding the GF Beef tongue: Once you get over the fact that it is one giant @$$ tongue, throw it in a crock pot with the liquid of your choice. I went with tomatos and chilis + seasoning. Leave it in there on low all day. When you pull it out, slice off the outer membrane of the tongue and discard it. After that, take two forks and shred the meat. It is indistinguishable from a regular roast and costs about half the price.

I made this when my grandkids were here, and nobody complained about the "beef tacos" we ate for dinner!

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on September 14, 2010
at 09:44 PM

ooooh, that sounds wonderful!

1
B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

on September 14, 2010
at 09:41 PM

I really adore tongue.

If you don't want it to look like what it is, Plunge the tongue into boiling water and cook for eight minutes. Drain immediately and remove the skin and root.

Now you have what to my taste is a large, cheap, dense piece of steak. Do with it what you will...

======= I also love this recipe for Lengua. http://allrecipes.com//Recipe/lengua-beef-tongue/Detail.aspx

I know this is a late entry, but I'm flipping through paleohacks for recipe ideas, and I'm feeling inspired. AND HUNGRY!

1
199e1758b73a72416fba6c10a55f93f3

(203)

on March 27, 2010
at 06:33 PM

The drawback to the blood sausage that is mentioned here several times is that it contains lots of wheat flour (or, alternatively, ground oatmeal) to hold it together. Not exactly paleo.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 27, 2010
at 09:26 PM

I have my butcher and pork farmers (one of my farmers does paleo himself) make it without flour. Boudin noir doesn't usually contain it anyway. In Sweden all their blood puddings had flour AND sugar...yuck.

1
Ab153bf62e1f51eea3243acdd2f7bfb9

on March 26, 2010
at 03:50 PM

I mince beef liver and add it to ground beef for meat loaf --if I do it 1/3 liver to 2/3 ground beef my family eats it up and asks for more.

I have found that beef heart just tastes like a strong meat flavor. It makes a nice chili.

1
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 26, 2010
at 01:09 PM

Foie gras was the first offal I ever ate. It's like if liver naturally tasted really really really good. Most liver doesn't taste like foie gras, but it opened my mind to the possibilities.

I think it's worth going to a really good restaurant to have your first of any offal because it shows you what a seasoned cook can make out of it. If I hadn't first tasted kidneys at a good restaurant called Palo Santo where they just know how to make them delicious, I wouldn't have known they could taste that way because my first efforts were well...awful.

If you want to know other NY restaurants that serve this stuff, let me know. Off the top of my head there is Yakitori Totto for chicken offal, The Vanderbilt for blood sausage, Momofuku for head and tendons. If you want foie gras everyone should go to Telepan since the vegans are protesting their foie gras on Saturday. The offal in Chinatown is delicious, but I often question their sources. Grand Sichuan has great tripe and Xi'an Restaurant has great lamb face. If you splurge go to Babbo....they even have testicles and it's Mario Batali's restaurant, so it's all good.

When I was a child I just didn't eat much food with flavor, so it's taken my some time to adjust to the strong mineral flavor of some offal. Admittedly, when I make liver it's a spicy thai preparation that mutes lots of that with spicy and acidic flavors. I don't use a recipe, just cook it in coconut oil or cream with shallots/garlic, various chilis, ginger, basil/mint, and lime/tamarind juice.

I'm also a big fan of a blood sausage. You can't go wrong as long as the sausage maker is good. If you like Mexican food, tongue tacos are an obvious and delicious choice despite not being paleo. Sometimes I order them and bring them home and take off the shell and dump it into nori, which is pretty delicious. Get Fresh Table and Market has them made from grassfed beef, which is fairly unusual.

3eb3f79868b24b3df4450ea2d4f9a5d5

(2387)

on September 15, 2010
at 08:25 AM

Oh wow, man, blood sausage, one of those German (British?) meals that are purely, utterly awesome. Roasted blood sausage, with apple puree (!), roasted onions and, if you like, mashed suqash. This combination is called "Himmel un Ääd" in the Rheinland region of Germany. Melissa,thank you for reminding me of that.

1
Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on February 13, 2010
at 04:09 PM

(Liver) pate. I am still trying to figure out how to make it myself, but store or restaurant bought ones are very good! You might be able to find some other delicacies like liver moose, head cheese, etc.

Organ meat is a different taste. I theorize that it is in our genes to reject new tastes as a defense mechanism against poisonous plants, etc. Most hunter gatherers would eat the same food their entire life. The way to "hack" this is to keep eating the new food until it tastes good. You probably want to eat it in as small as portions as you can until it wins you over. Mixing it in as a mystery meat with something else is one thing to try.

I will second the beef togue as an easy organ meat, although I don't think there is a nutritional motivation there besides the fact that it comes with enough fat for your meal. I have been able to find lamb's head at a muslim food store- the eyes and brain are excellent. This may not be "friendly" if you have an issue with looking at a dead lamb's head or cracking open its skull (not easy) to obtain the brains.

Nutritionally, liver is probably the most important organ. Eat pate, then try chicken livers- they are very mild.

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on February 14, 2010
at 06:04 AM

Beef liver has a stonger taste which is why I thought it might be better to start with chicken livers.

7f8d633c32b75ad7f9f148ceb6283866

(315)

on February 13, 2010
at 06:33 PM

any reason why this wouldn't work with beef liver?

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