3

votes

How did Grok manage his RDA

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 30, 2011 at 10:11 AM

How do we explain the concept of RDA with respect to the Paleolithic?

It is quite likely that various groups ate very similar foods for days on end. A relatively large hunted animal would feed a group for days and they might eat a portion from it every time they have a meal - and then there would be relatively long periods when they would just forage and live on sub optimal food.

If RDA was so important, these groups would not be able to have healthy off-springs, and over a long period - poor nutrition coupled with probable in breeding would result in their extinction.

How did we get past this to be where we are today?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 01, 2011
at 06:05 PM

Instead of increasing the hyperbole I'll agree dean that I am wrong in raising the status of glucose from stressor to poison, though many on PH call it that. I'll also agree that has a strong effect on VLC dieters and leave it at that. Regarding IV glucose: that only occurred to me while thinking about places that glucose is administered as food, and that hospitals can sometimes be careless about checking patient histories before administering a variety of things. A bite of the food is probably more dangerous to a VLC than the IV.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 05:41 PM

I'm sorry, you're still doing it wrong. It's cliff and you who made that generalized assumption, I merely remarked about a fact that may have played a role in this case. I posted to correct the attribution of a carnivorous diet to a heart attack. I didn't call glucose a poison, I called it a stressor, and that it is, especially when one has been VLC.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 05:38 PM

I'm sorry, you're still doing it wrong. It's cliff and you who made that generalized assumption, I merely remarked about a fact that may have played a role in this case. I posted to correct the attribution of a carnivorous diet to a heart attack. I didn't call glucose a poison, I called it a stressor, and that it is, especially when one has been VLC.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 01, 2011
at 04:45 PM

dean it's hard to reconstruct what happened on an N=1 from 1929. It's silly to draw any conclusions from it, which is partly my point. But it's also humbug to call glucose a poison. We're omnivores and we don't die from eating a bunch of grapes, or 4 candy bars.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 04:08 PM

oh and plz get your facts straight. a candy bar has maybe 1/4 the glucose, few people in that situation will get pneumonia, insulin resistance when VLC is a natural and healthy state, a hospital situation like you describe is very unlikely and gluose is administered steadily, the shock i describe is different from the state of shock... I guess the days of real arguments on PH are over.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 04:01 PM

I'd rather have a strong immune system the rest of the time, thank you very much. This is getting beyond silly.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 01, 2011
at 02:48 PM

You've got it dean. If eating an all meat/fat diet turns an easily digestible food into case of pneumonia, there's one good reason to avoid an all meat/fat diet. Going beyond the metabolic issue, if you're a VLC eater and get in an accident, would you be OK on the glucose IV at the hospital? Or would the sudden reintroduction of high glucose send you into shock?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 02:29 PM

Please. Deify tubers if it makes you sleep better at night. ಠ_ಠ

D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on December 01, 2011
at 02:02 PM

Exactly the point; why would you think plant foods such as tubers wouldn't have made up a significant proportion of the diet?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:31 PM

Let me get this right, you are suggesting that because he was exposed to a major, proven stressor that suppressed his immune system, he should have been exposing himself to it regularly, even though he was feeling healthier than ever without it, to build up a tolerance? Seriously?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:29 PM

Let me get this right, you are suggesting that because he was exposed to a major, proven, unnatural stressor that suppressed his immune system, he should have been exposing himself to it regularly, even though he was feeling healthier than ever without it, to build up a tolerance? Seriously?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:26 PM

Let me get this right, you are suggesting that because he was exposed to a major, proven, unnatural stressor, he should have been exposing himself to it regularly, even though he was feeling healthier than ever without it, to build up a tolerance? Seriously?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:05 PM

That's about a candy bar's worth of glucose. If an all-meat/fat diet induces a negative health reaction of that magnitude to such a small dose of sugar, you'd best stay on a mixed diet. Many LC hackers here report nasty health effects from carb reintroduction, though I haven't seen any this severe.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on December 01, 2011
at 12:07 PM

what does that say for the all meat diet? If you all of sudden have to eat carbs in an emergency situation you might suffer some sort of attack?

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on December 01, 2011
at 12:05 PM

so one dose of 100g of glucose caused the not his year long diet of nothing but meat?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 02:59 AM

He didn't even have a heart attack. He had pneumonia. Sugar is known to suppress the immune system and it was probably an especially big shock to his system after not being exposed to it for a while.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:07 AM

From the same paper: "the clinical observations and laboratory studies gave no evidence that any ill effects had occurred from the prolonged use of the exclusive meat diet." You should really know better cliff, this study is famous for that last quote.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:05 AM

WOW cliff, you should really check your sources instead of quoting such BS! This is a more complete quote: "On the morning of February 15, he took 100 gm. of glucose for a glucose tolerance test. That evening he had pain in the right chest, a severe chill, and rapidly rising temperature. The next day the sputum was rusty in color, the temperature was 40.0’ (104’F.), and signs of consolidation were present over the rigbt lower lobe. A diagnosis of lobar pneumonia was made. The infecting organism was the pneumococcus, Type II." http://www.jbc.org/content/87/3/651.full.pdf+html

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on November 30, 2011
at 03:41 PM

Arguing about manganese rich plants is completely beside the point anyways since it's easy to cover manganese RDA when eating plants.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 30, 2011
at 02:17 PM

No, My first thought would never involve doing mental math or tracking what I ate. It would be to think about what foods contained the vitamin and reflect about whether or not I ate those kinds of foods regularly over the past week or a month. If I didn't, I might think about upping intake the next week or month.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on November 30, 2011
at 01:32 PM

Gydle, I am not sure if people misinterpret so much as it's a lot easier to track one's daily consumption of a nutrient than monthly. If someone told you that you needed an X amount of a vitamin per month, wouldn't your first thought be to divide it by 30 to figure out how much you needed per day?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 30, 2011
at 01:27 PM

It is problematic to guess nutrient intakes from wild prehistoric foods based on modern agricultural foods.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 30, 2011
at 01:05 PM

People misinterpret everything.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:55 PM

Who was talking about muscle meat only, JRAC?

D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:52 PM

Too right Cliff, I just ate some pineapple, plently in there. :-)

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:46 PM

certain fruits are extremly rich in manganese

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:45 PM

Plenty of tubers can be eaten raw.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:43 PM

"Sounds like a heart attack. Not that strange when you consider that the subjects’ cholesterol level rose to 800. [Cardiologists consider a total cholesterol count of 240 to be the level at which you need to intervene because of the danger of a heart attack, Ed.] "

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:43 PM

Don't forget that the people in that experiment experienced health problems "The men lost large amounts of calcium – about 400 mg per day. Meat contains little calcium, but the calcium metabolism cycle continued in the men’s bodies. [J. Biol. Chem. 1930 87: 669-680.] Even more serious is what happened to Karsten Anderson after a year on the meat diet. In the spring of 1929 the polar explorer developed "pain in the right chest, a severe chill, and rapidly rising temperature. The next day the sputum was rusty in color, the temperature was 40 degrees", the researchers wrote. [J. Biol. Chem. 1930

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:25 PM

@Matthew maybe so, but people interpret them as daily needs and take supplements accordingly.

D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:09 PM

Yams have 30% of RDA in a 200 calorie portion...

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:01 PM

It takes over 850g of sweet potato and 1600g potato to reach the RDA of manganese. No, just no.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:56 AM

You could sooner make an argument for manganese from clams/mussels than from tubers, really. By the point our ancestors were smart enough to dig for and COOK tubers - you know, to make them digestible - evolution had already happened. You got me on the toxicity argument. What about the others? btw: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20855239

D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:51 AM

All micronutrients are toxic at a certain level; I don't see that as a reason to avoid any particular food. In circles outside of the paleosphere (and VLC paleosphere) it's well known hominids have been eating tubers and roots for a long time. In fact, some theorise some of the first tools were used for digging for underground starchy veg. Tools and intelligence made us who we are, we dig for food as many animals do not, we could crack bones open and eventually become intelligent enough to hunt big game. Not bad going for a feeble little naked ape like ourselves. :-)

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:44 AM

If only it were that simple, right? Alas, there are several problems with such cause and effect logic. I look at the rates at which manganese is excreted, at magnesium fulfilling some it's functions, at higher manganese content in drinking water correlating with lowered intelligence, at it's toxicity, at the fact that tubers need to be cooked and there not being any single plant food group that we would have evolved to require. Maybe the RDA is off? Wait, did I say drinking water? Yeah, maybe that was the source of such TRACE minerals.

D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:40 AM

Grok: ''I'm only at 95% of my calcium requirement for the day, bugger! Better run down to the supplement tree before 23:59'' :-)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:34 AM

RDAs are daily averages over a period of time. There is no requirement to eat a certain amount everyday. They are often calculated as the daily average from a week or months worth of food intake for convenience.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:32 AM

RDAs are daily averages over a period of time. There is no requirement to eat a certain amount everyday. They are often calculated from a week or months worth of food intake for convenience.

D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:22 AM

Do you know what are high in manganese? Tubers! Wait, wait. I hear ''there's no essential carbohydrate being screamed'' as the myth on humans being 100% carnivorous falls to pieces.

D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:13 AM

The problem with RDAs is different diets have different nutritional requirements. I don't think muscle meat + vegetables is a great diet (although will still be miles better than what Joe Bloggs gets).

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on November 30, 2011
at 10:40 AM

An example: Animal foods are low in manganese. They would rarely have met the RDA of manganese unless they carried nuts at all times or eaten copious amounts of vegetables daily, both of which seems doubtful.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 30, 2011
at 10:28 AM

Why do you think that their diets would not have met the RDAs?

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9 Answers

10
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 30, 2011
at 10:28 AM

RDA is an institutional construct and IMHO has little to do with reality. Grok and Grokkina probably got a balanced ratio of nutrients over a longer time period - probably weekly or monthly, perhaps, as in vitamin D, even seasonally. For some reason, contemporary medicine has shrunk the period for obtaining nutrient balance down to t=24hours. It would be interesting to delve, Taubes-like, into the reasons why. Methinks money might be involved.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:32 AM

RDAs are daily averages over a period of time. There is no requirement to eat a certain amount everyday. They are often calculated from a week or months worth of food intake for convenience.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 30, 2011
at 01:05 PM

People misinterpret everything.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:25 PM

@Matthew maybe so, but people interpret them as daily needs and take supplements accordingly.

D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:40 AM

Grok: ''I'm only at 95% of my calcium requirement for the day, bugger! Better run down to the supplement tree before 23:59'' :-)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:34 AM

RDAs are daily averages over a period of time. There is no requirement to eat a certain amount everyday. They are often calculated as the daily average from a week or months worth of food intake for convenience.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on November 30, 2011
at 01:32 PM

Gydle, I am not sure if people misinterpret so much as it's a lot easier to track one's daily consumption of a nutrient than monthly. If someone told you that you needed an X amount of a vitamin per month, wouldn't your first thought be to divide it by 30 to figure out how much you needed per day?

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 30, 2011
at 02:17 PM

No, My first thought would never involve doing mental math or tracking what I ate. It would be to think about what foods contained the vitamin and reflect about whether or not I ate those kinds of foods regularly over the past week or a month. If I didn't, I might think about upping intake the next week or month.

4
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:12 AM

Grok managed his RDA the old-fashioned way; he either survived/thrived on the available foods or died. Those who lived to raise offspring at least to adolescence were those who did the best on whatever could be scrounged/hunted/foraged.

Over time, the RDA became those foods that were available in the natural environment. With the ebb and flow of glaciers up north and forests/savannahs down south, he was even more challenged and again either found a way to survive or died out--and fossils show that many did the latter.

And here we are today! (Unfortunately trying to live on cereal and manufactured food-like products.)

4
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:47 PM

Wild foods in general are much more nutritious and HG's eat very varied diets. Many tribes probably did suffer from certain deficiencies as well(and had health problems), its a logical fallacy to assume they all got perfect nutrition and had good health.

3
D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on November 30, 2011
at 10:50 AM

We're also told to eat wholegrains...

RDA is a starting point but it's hardly a basis for health. I could meet the minimum requirement for vitamin C and end up with scurvy if I had a condition that depleted vitamin C rapidly and was not raising insulin enough (to recycle it). Equally you could think you'd be getting enough vitamin A from the RDA and actually getting no usable amount for a number of reasons (inability to convert carotene to vitamin A, lack of fat etc).

Eating nutrient dense low toxicity foods is the best route to health. If I were eating lean meats and vegetables I'd be worried too. :-)

Also, who ever said Grok was never lacking in some nutrients?

1
Medium avatar

on December 01, 2011
at 04:10 AM

Great question. Eating the organs of animals will provide a lot of the nutrients our ancestors needed, but they weren't available to them all the time like they are to us. This is where evolution comes in, because they survived when certain nutrients were low or nonexistent in their food supply for various amounts of time. We have the needs we recognize today because of the foods that were/weren't in our ancestors diet that changed their needs for each nutrient. They evolved to produce the molecules that filled the most important functions of our body, and if they didn't evolve to make certain molecules or lost the ability to do so (like vitamin C) it was because there was evolutionary pressure against producing that molecule because it could be found in the food supply. Keep in mind they ate many things from the soil and the soil back then was nutrient rich so they got a lot more minerals that way. Also, they could afford to be low in certain nutrients at various times because they ate the best foods for their bodies so they weren't putting the stress on their bodies many people in modern times do from a bad diet and poor lifestyle choices which depletes various nutrients in the body.

1
27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on November 30, 2011
at 09:39 PM

@ Cliff: The link below has the full text of the journal article you quoted from. The part you quote about Anderson is on bottom of page 654 and continued on top of page 655 and refers to what happened after the all meat/fat diet. It specifically speaks of Anderson having completed the 367 days on the all meat/fat diet (January 24, 1929) and then being tested for 3 additional subsequent weeks on a "variety" of diets "all high fat" but not all meat/fat. He became ill during this additional 3 week period of variety diets and mid-February got the attack. Most importantly, on the morning of the attack, he was subjected to 100 grams of glucose for a glucose tolerance test. Full text is in the link above. The devil is in the details.

http://www.jbc.org/content/87/3/651.full.pdf+html

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:05 PM

That's about a candy bar's worth of glucose. If an all-meat/fat diet induces a negative health reaction of that magnitude to such a small dose of sugar, you'd best stay on a mixed diet. Many LC hackers here report nasty health effects from carb reintroduction, though I haven't seen any this severe.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 04:01 PM

I'd rather have a strong immune system the rest of the time, thank you very much. This is getting beyond silly.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on December 01, 2011
at 12:05 PM

so one dose of 100g of glucose caused the not his year long diet of nothing but meat?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:26 PM

Let me get this right, you are suggesting that because he was exposed to a major, proven, unnatural stressor, he should have been exposing himself to it regularly, even though he was feeling healthier than ever without it, to build up a tolerance? Seriously?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:31 PM

Let me get this right, you are suggesting that because he was exposed to a major, proven stressor that suppressed his immune system, he should have been exposing himself to it regularly, even though he was feeling healthier than ever without it, to build up a tolerance? Seriously?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 05:38 PM

I'm sorry, you're still doing it wrong. It's cliff and you who made that generalized assumption, I merely remarked about a fact that may have played a role in this case. I posted to correct the attribution of a carnivorous diet to a heart attack. I didn't call glucose a poison, I called it a stressor, and that it is, especially when one has been VLC.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:29 PM

Let me get this right, you are suggesting that because he was exposed to a major, proven, unnatural stressor that suppressed his immune system, he should have been exposing himself to it regularly, even though he was feeling healthier than ever without it, to build up a tolerance? Seriously?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 01, 2011
at 02:48 PM

You've got it dean. If eating an all meat/fat diet turns an easily digestible food into case of pneumonia, there's one good reason to avoid an all meat/fat diet. Going beyond the metabolic issue, if you're a VLC eater and get in an accident, would you be OK on the glucose IV at the hospital? Or would the sudden reintroduction of high glucose send you into shock?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 02:59 AM

He didn't even have a heart attack. He had pneumonia. Sugar is known to suppress the immune system and it was probably an especially big shock to his system after not being exposed to it for a while.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on December 01, 2011
at 12:07 PM

what does that say for the all meat diet? If you all of sudden have to eat carbs in an emergency situation you might suffer some sort of attack?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 01, 2011
at 06:05 PM

Instead of increasing the hyperbole I'll agree dean that I am wrong in raising the status of glucose from stressor to poison, though many on PH call it that. I'll also agree that has a strong effect on VLC dieters and leave it at that. Regarding IV glucose: that only occurred to me while thinking about places that glucose is administered as food, and that hospitals can sometimes be careless about checking patient histories before administering a variety of things. A bite of the food is probably more dangerous to a VLC than the IV.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 01, 2011
at 04:45 PM

dean it's hard to reconstruct what happened on an N=1 from 1929. It's silly to draw any conclusions from it, which is partly my point. But it's also humbug to call glucose a poison. We're omnivores and we don't die from eating a bunch of grapes, or 4 candy bars.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 05:41 PM

I'm sorry, you're still doing it wrong. It's cliff and you who made that generalized assumption, I merely remarked about a fact that may have played a role in this case. I posted to correct the attribution of a carnivorous diet to a heart attack. I didn't call glucose a poison, I called it a stressor, and that it is, especially when one has been VLC.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 04:08 PM

oh and plz get your facts straight. a candy bar has maybe 1/4 the glucose, few people in that situation will get pneumonia, insulin resistance when VLC is a natural and healthy state, a hospital situation like you describe is very unlikely and gluose is administered steadily, the shock i describe is different from the state of shock... I guess the days of real arguments on PH are over.

1
B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on November 30, 2011
at 10:51 AM

Don't forget about this : ZC experiment. Besides, if I stopped eating coconut oil and ate only meat and veggies instead, I'd hit the RDA for everything with no effort.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:55 PM

Who was talking about muscle meat only, JRAC?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:07 AM

From the same paper: "the clinical observations and laboratory studies gave no evidence that any ill effects had occurred from the prolonged use of the exclusive meat diet." You should really know better cliff, this study is famous for that last quote.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 01, 2011
at 01:05 AM

WOW cliff, you should really check your sources instead of quoting such BS! This is a more complete quote: "On the morning of February 15, he took 100 gm. of glucose for a glucose tolerance test. That evening he had pain in the right chest, a severe chill, and rapidly rising temperature. The next day the sputum was rusty in color, the temperature was 40.0’ (104’F.), and signs of consolidation were present over the rigbt lower lobe. A diagnosis of lobar pneumonia was made. The infecting organism was the pneumococcus, Type II." http://www.jbc.org/content/87/3/651.full.pdf+html

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:43 PM

Don't forget that the people in that experiment experienced health problems "The men lost large amounts of calcium – about 400 mg per day. Meat contains little calcium, but the calcium metabolism cycle continued in the men’s bodies. [J. Biol. Chem. 1930 87: 669-680.] Even more serious is what happened to Karsten Anderson after a year on the meat diet. In the spring of 1929 the polar explorer developed "pain in the right chest, a severe chill, and rapidly rising temperature. The next day the sputum was rusty in color, the temperature was 40 degrees", the researchers wrote. [J. Biol. Chem. 1930

D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on November 30, 2011
at 11:13 AM

The problem with RDAs is different diets have different nutritional requirements. I don't think muscle meat + vegetables is a great diet (although will still be miles better than what Joe Bloggs gets).

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:43 PM

"Sounds like a heart attack. Not that strange when you consider that the subjects’ cholesterol level rose to 800. [Cardiologists consider a total cholesterol count of 240 to be the level at which you need to intervene because of the danger of a heart attack, Ed.] "

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 30, 2011
at 02:07 PM

i am really confused about whole thing.

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 30, 2011
at 01:10 PM

Food availability determined where paleos could survive at all. Traveling distances greater than 5 miles was difficult and uncertain. Our ability to eat food in quantities far in excess of modern RDA, and to digest a wide range of nutrients, is a result of successful adaptation to survive in a small locality.

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