2

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Do you think cavemen really cooked all their food?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 01, 2012 at 12:51 AM

Do you think cavemen ate the majority of their food raw? Is it more beneficial to consume veggies, eggs, and meats raw? How does one eat raw chicken and beef? How is it prepared?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 01, 2012
at 08:49 PM

Before slow cookers, before cast iron, before clay, before hot rocks in baskets there was pit cooking. Paleos may have eaten some meat well done, but stews are Neolithic fare.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 01, 2012
at 08:45 PM

Before ladles one needed fire annealed hands.

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on June 01, 2012
at 08:28 AM

Isn't there a cave painting of that in Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc?

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on June 01, 2012
at 02:31 AM

Is dried meat raw? I think a lot of it was eaten dried as that is the easiest way to preserve it.

F38f19b6ec74b2c6bf49531fe5dae567

(486)

on June 01, 2012
at 02:04 AM

Where's the evidence that suggests that they cooked the "vast majority"? Did you cite that from the book?

Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

(4400)

on June 01, 2012
at 01:13 AM

I have read it. It's a must read for Paleo folks. The answer is yes, people cooked a lot, and there's evidence in our genes and biology.

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6 Answers

best answer

3
F8f38dfefde197df8ac1782ab6e65a60

on June 01, 2012
at 01:58 AM

Actually even if food was cooked by cavemen such as meat, it would not be a piece the size of and thickness of a typical steak from the supermarket and would certainly not be cooked to "well done". If hunter gatherers did cook meat it would have been a whole animal. Lets say a deer for example they would have simply put it on the fire and let it cook, but due to its size and thickness, inside would have still been rare, red and full of blood. I highly doubt the majority of their meat was charred or cooked right through. This is where many paleo enthusiasts make the mistake. Most of our meat was either raw or cooked but only cooked to rare in "most" cases.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 01, 2012
at 08:49 PM

Before slow cookers, before cast iron, before clay, before hot rocks in baskets there was pit cooking. Paleos may have eaten some meat well done, but stews are Neolithic fare.

3
26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on June 01, 2012
at 01:10 AM

Yes. All boysenberry sauce was properly rendered in a clay double-boiler. Then, the sauce was carefully gourd-ladeled over a nice fire-broiled boar chop.

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on June 01, 2012
at 08:28 AM

Isn't there a cave painting of that in Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 01, 2012
at 08:45 PM

Before ladles one needed fire annealed hands.

2
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on June 01, 2012
at 12:58 AM

Cooking is a large part of what makes us human! Cavemen cooked the vast majority of their food. Cooking allowed our stomachs to shrink and, by making digestion easier, freed up energy for brain development. Additionally, cooking fostered an atmosphere of socialization and bonding around fire, as opposed to spending the day foraging and grazing. It is an essential aspect of being human.

If you want to learn more I definitely suggest reading "Catching Fire" by Richard Wrangham.

F38f19b6ec74b2c6bf49531fe5dae567

(486)

on June 01, 2012
at 02:04 AM

Where's the evidence that suggests that they cooked the "vast majority"? Did you cite that from the book?

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 01, 2012
at 12:57 AM

I haven't read it yet, but it sounds intriguing: Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human. Certainly makes sense that cooking differentiated us, evolutionarily.

Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

(4400)

on June 01, 2012
at 01:13 AM

I have read it. It's a must read for Paleo folks. The answer is yes, people cooked a lot, and there's evidence in our genes and biology.

0
Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

on June 01, 2012
at 03:32 AM

In some instances, I'm sure they did eat some stuff raw. Beef is safer to eat raw than chicken or pork. I've had it in restaurants raw. For a piece of steak, the bacteria sits on the surface, which is why you can eat a steak rare, but not a hamburger. If you just cook the surface of the steak, the inside is safe. With ground beef, the grinding mixes the surface all through the meat, so it's all contaminated.

However, I'm sure that they would have had more exposure to food borne toxins than we do, and developed a higher tolerance for it. They still would have had food poisoning symptoms regularly. People today regularly get food poisoning and think they've contracted a "24 hour bug", but there are no "24 hour bugs". If you suddenly develop nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting, and it clears up in 24 hours, you had food poisoning, not the flu.

All food molds are toxic, and food borne pathogens can be on fruits and veggies. Bacillus Cereus is a serious one, and it is most commonly found in rice, which is a dish most people would not consider very dangerous.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacillus_cereus

0
C3bc92e6b5eba45dc55f43ac3c70cc25

on June 01, 2012
at 03:05 AM

There are raw paleo followers, groups & message boards if you're seeking more info.

Cooked food is not going to kill you. So dont let those raw foodies bully you about eating all those AGEs. Personally I think its ok eating some "safer" raw foods occasionally. Like sauerkraut, sashimi,Tartar carpacci. Just be certain it's from reputable sources.

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