2

votes

Raw Goat Cheese Mold

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 21, 2012 at 3:07 AM

The (hard) raw goat cheese that I buy at my local grocery store often starts to mold (just a tab bit) a day or two after purchasing. Should I just eat the small specs of mold or stay away from it?

I know I'm going to survive if I eat it and I know our bodies are meant to adapt to our environment, but I want some solid arguments that are either for or against the consumption of the minimal amounts of natural mold.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on August 21, 2012
at 02:09 PM

Unless you can identify the mold, it isn't safe to eat, elektrosaman. See Matt's response.

Ee04db68fcab556868524acb55ac5fd4

on August 21, 2012
at 01:27 PM

Ok so what about Blue Cheese? That's mold from goat cheese. http://www.ehow.com/list_6060211_health-benefits-blue-cheese_.html

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on August 21, 2012
at 01:12 PM

The 1-inch cut around the mold is definitely important. Mold grows tendrils into the food that you may not be able to see. I forgot about that until I saw your answer.

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4 Answers

3
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 21, 2012
at 11:33 AM

Avoid mold. Many mycotoxins (compounds formed by molds) are well-known carcinogens (e.g. aflatoxin). While the mold you might be culturing on your cheese could be benign, it could also be one with some toxicity. I'd say let the cheesemakers deal with getting the correct mold growing on the cheese, experimenting at home would be akin to picking random mushrooms from your backyard.

1
Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

on August 21, 2012
at 06:14 AM

Don't eat the mold. However, you're in luck, because hard cheese is the only food you can eat after it starts to mold, just cut it away with a good one inch to spare and then go ahead and eat the remainder.

Edited to add: This is basic foodsafe information. You should not eat food molds like that.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on August 21, 2012
at 02:09 PM

Unless you can identify the mold, it isn't safe to eat, elektrosaman. See Matt's response.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on August 21, 2012
at 01:12 PM

The 1-inch cut around the mold is definitely important. Mold grows tendrils into the food that you may not be able to see. I forgot about that until I saw your answer.

Ee04db68fcab556868524acb55ac5fd4

on August 21, 2012
at 01:27 PM

Ok so what about Blue Cheese? That's mold from goat cheese. http://www.ehow.com/list_6060211_health-benefits-blue-cheese_.html

0
Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

on August 21, 2012
at 05:56 AM

If you don't mind the taste, eat it. If it tastes bad, don't eat it.

If it tastes great, go buy some more.

0
194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on August 21, 2012
at 04:15 AM

Perhaps there's something to be said about listening to that primal voice from within when it says "ew that's gross."

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