12

votes

Is honey sold in supermarkets good?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 18, 2012 at 3:25 PM

I apologize if this has been asked before but I am confused about raw honey vs honey in the supermarkets. Is it that the ones in the stores are pasteurized? How exactly are they different and am I wasting my money on store bought honey.

Af49bced416926d9f88e47a7e705d99d

(20)

on June 29, 2012
at 10:33 AM

if you have no other source, y.s. bee farms has a raw organic honey. check it out on amazon. whole foods has it in my area as well.

Af49bced416926d9f88e47a7e705d99d

(20)

on June 29, 2012
at 10:30 AM

i don't think that's necessarily the case. i have bought from several honey producers at the farmers market that are more clear and runny (as opposed to the stuff that's a semi solid and light colored). they claim it is raw. i think they filter it and heat it just enough to be able to bottle it, around 105 degrees. but yes... not all raw honey is equal. obviously the unfiltered stuff is better.

Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

(3125)

on January 24, 2012
at 10:56 PM

most honey is adulterated. or cut with corn syrup. the innocent looking guy at the farmers market can buy drums of grade B bakers honey and turn a nifty profit selling it for 6 dollars a pound.Its just the world we live in. Olive oil is no different.

Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

(3125)

on January 24, 2012
at 10:51 PM

humans have salivary amylase, we are good at digesting honey.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 21, 2012
at 03:42 PM

Hey Warren - apparently the enzymes, phytochemicals and essential nutrients contained in honey will be destroyed when it is heated above 152 degrees C. I've also read that when it's not pasteurized its easier to digest due to the amount of amylase in the raw product.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on January 19, 2012
at 03:17 AM

Nope, I checked. Andy M is permanently banned. I don't see any evidence Cliff or any of these other users are downvoting you either. Please do not accuse people of having a vendetta against you unless you have real evidence.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 18, 2012
at 11:28 PM

I believe the site is true. Assuming all you are interested is in the sugar content. That's why it's so easy to fake honey with HFCS and other sugar + water. As for it not being Paleo, I think you are wrong. I don't doubt that early man did its best to get the honey goodness from the hives back then. Not particularly hard, asides from the stingers.

9143379e9450c76e3246db057133833d

(273)

on January 18, 2012
at 09:21 PM

Huh. Well, it wasn't me considering I don't disagree with anything you said there (except the possibility that HFCS may have higher calories than stated, but not sure the science is very firm on that yet). Just because I don't demonize sugar in certain contexts doesn't mean I believe everyone should be eating it in all forms on a constant basis. If someone is following something with set rules within Paleo, Primal or PH then so be it. If someone doesn't agree with you on a thread and offers another view doesn't mean they're a "troll". I suppose whoever downvoted you may qualify though. ;)

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 18, 2012
at 07:52 PM

I think that some of that info is questionable (I think FoodSafetyNews has an agenda). But I would buy local from someone I know, vs from a big store. To be honest, I don't buy/use much honey, so it's a minor issue for me.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 18, 2012
at 07:17 PM

That is because it is accurate and the gang of AndyMs,Cliffs, PrimalCGs, and all their other aliases that troll PaleoHacks looking to insert absurd Dr Ray Peat pseudo science claims like to down vote my posts. Its all good though, I even included a pro-bee-pro-honey website link which proves that honey is no different than any other 'fructose containing sugar', including its ultra-low-micro nutrient content.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 18, 2012
at 07:15 PM

There's no real research to quantify it. Just the understanding of what pasteurizing does and how it affects those components.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 18, 2012
at 07:15 PM

That is because it is accurate and the gang of AndyMs,Cliffs, PrimalCGs, and all their other aliases that troll PaleoHacks looking to insert absurd Dr Ray Peat pseudo science claims like to down vote my posts. Its all good though, I even included a pro-bee-pro-honey website link which proves that honey is no different than any other 'sugar', including its ultra-low-micro nutrient properties.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 18, 2012
at 05:03 PM

Does the pastuerising really destroy all of the "goodies" or are there some left?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 18, 2012
at 05:00 PM

Strange how this has been marked down several times but nobody has bothered to dispute what you are saying.

778b36f4f699f202de135ef176fe9ab7

(1123)

on January 18, 2012
at 04:27 PM

Good question! Thanks for asking it :)

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6 Answers

9
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 18, 2012
at 03:53 PM

Honey at the grocery, unless stated it's "raw" is pasteurized so it will be clear and golden. Raw honey is off-white and cloudy. Definitely buy local if you can, any greenmarket should be able to hook you up, support your farmer :) I know that Trader Joe's does carry raw at a good price.

Most definitely there are benefits over pasteurized, as the pasteurizing process destroys all the goodies in raw: enzymes, phytochemicals, nutrients.

Also, raw honey has a high potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, protein, and vitamin C content. It is also a strong antibacterial, and awesome immunity builder. I know people use raw when they get burns as it works as an antiseptic and a painkiller. Neat right? Magical bees!

Nerd Alert:

Egyptians used a salve of honey and grease as wound dressing. It was also used by the German physicians during World War I to treat gunshot wounds. In 1946, Professor S. Smirnov from the Tomsk Medical Institute applied honey on bullet wounds in 75 cases and concluded that it stimulates the growth of tissue in wounds that take a very long time to heal.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 18, 2012
at 05:03 PM

Does the pastuerising really destroy all of the "goodies" or are there some left?

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 18, 2012
at 07:15 PM

There's no real research to quantify it. Just the understanding of what pasteurizing does and how it affects those components.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 21, 2012
at 03:42 PM

Hey Warren - apparently the enzymes, phytochemicals and essential nutrients contained in honey will be destroyed when it is heated above 152 degrees C. I've also read that when it's not pasteurized its easier to digest due to the amount of amylase in the raw product.

Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

(3125)

on January 24, 2012
at 10:51 PM

humans have salivary amylase, we are good at digesting honey.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 18, 2012
at 07:52 PM

I think that some of that info is questionable (I think FoodSafetyNews has an agenda). But I would buy local from someone I know, vs from a big store. To be honest, I don't buy/use much honey, so it's a minor issue for me.

3
Medium avatar

(2923)

on January 18, 2012
at 04:15 PM

You want to look for three things (and finding all three at a supermarket is pretty hard, your best bet is your local farmers market, failing that, a Whole Foods or other health food store):

  1. Raw - Jesuisjuba listed the advantages of raw honey, raw honey is yet another of those miracle foods
  2. Unfiltered - goes along with the raw, the nutrients haven't been removed to make it look pretty
  3. Local - the advantage of local is the honey's pollen content. This allows seasonal allergy suffers a chance to lessen their response when exposed to airborne pollen.

1
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 18, 2012
at 04:16 PM

As has been noted here, store bought honey is basically just sugar, with few/none of the ancillary benefits usually attributed to honey.

Short story: buy your honey from your local farmer's market, or find an apiary nearby that will sell to you.

Longer story has two parts.

1) Honey that is pasteurized has likely also been stripped entirely of it's pollen. Besides losing the possibility of health benefits from pollen, stripping the pollen also makes the honey untraceable, since the pollen acts as a "fingerprint" of the locale it's from. What this means is that you are getting honey from who-knows-where, and readied for market by who-knows-what methods. See here for more info: http://motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2011/11/supermarkets-sell-fake-honey .

2) If you want a dash of sweetness from honey, and are also already getting your honey locally like you're supposed to ;-) , then consider also getting honeycomb. Honeycomb is delectable in it's own right, and pairs fantastically with meats. Eating the honeycomb ensures that you are getting the widest range of the various trace minerals and vitamins the bees bring into the comb. I find the honeycomb "wax" to be tasty and quite palatable (I've never had it chewy in a gross way ever).

1
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on January 18, 2012
at 03:52 PM

Honey from the supermarket has either a glucose-fructose ratio of 1:1 or 30:70. Or somewhere in the middle. It is either identical to sucrose, or high fructose corn syrup in its sugar contents and type.

Here is a nice pro-bee website which proves that there is such little difference between sucrose and honey they are for all practical application the same thing.

http://www.buzzaboutbees.net/honey-vs-sugar.html

If your doing the Paleo, Primal or Perfect Health Diet, Honey clearly falls under the 'Do Not Eat Sugar' category. Sorry bee-keepers.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 18, 2012
at 11:28 PM

I believe the site is true. Assuming all you are interested is in the sugar content. That's why it's so easy to fake honey with HFCS and other sugar + water. As for it not being Paleo, I think you are wrong. I don't doubt that early man did its best to get the honey goodness from the hives back then. Not particularly hard, asides from the stingers.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 18, 2012
at 07:17 PM

That is because it is accurate and the gang of AndyMs,Cliffs, PrimalCGs, and all their other aliases that troll PaleoHacks looking to insert absurd Dr Ray Peat pseudo science claims like to down vote my posts. Its all good though, I even included a pro-bee-pro-honey website link which proves that honey is no different than any other 'fructose containing sugar', including its ultra-low-micro nutrient content.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 18, 2012
at 07:15 PM

That is because it is accurate and the gang of AndyMs,Cliffs, PrimalCGs, and all their other aliases that troll PaleoHacks looking to insert absurd Dr Ray Peat pseudo science claims like to down vote my posts. Its all good though, I even included a pro-bee-pro-honey website link which proves that honey is no different than any other 'sugar', including its ultra-low-micro nutrient properties.

9143379e9450c76e3246db057133833d

(273)

on January 18, 2012
at 09:21 PM

Huh. Well, it wasn't me considering I don't disagree with anything you said there (except the possibility that HFCS may have higher calories than stated, but not sure the science is very firm on that yet). Just because I don't demonize sugar in certain contexts doesn't mean I believe everyone should be eating it in all forms on a constant basis. If someone is following something with set rules within Paleo, Primal or PH then so be it. If someone doesn't agree with you on a thread and offers another view doesn't mean they're a "troll". I suppose whoever downvoted you may qualify though. ;)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 18, 2012
at 05:00 PM

Strange how this has been marked down several times but nobody has bothered to dispute what you are saying.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on January 19, 2012
at 03:17 AM

Nope, I checked. Andy M is permanently banned. I don't see any evidence Cliff or any of these other users are downvoting you either. Please do not accuse people of having a vendetta against you unless you have real evidence.

Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

(3125)

on January 24, 2012
at 10:56 PM

most honey is adulterated. or cut with corn syrup. the innocent looking guy at the farmers market can buy drums of grade B bakers honey and turn a nifty profit selling it for 6 dollars a pound.Its just the world we live in. Olive oil is no different.

0
Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

on January 18, 2012
at 03:31 PM

Essentially if it's a clear runny liquid then yes, it's been pasteurized, and so has much fewer nutrients than found in raw honey. There's lots of different levels as well, as with other foods, so not all raw honeys are created equal. If you want some honey, then you're not wasting your money to get the stuff from the store - it's a reasonable, palatable source of sugar. But if you want the bonus nutrition that bees have to offer, then there's better options available.

Af49bced416926d9f88e47a7e705d99d

(20)

on June 29, 2012
at 10:30 AM

i don't think that's necessarily the case. i have bought from several honey producers at the farmers market that are more clear and runny (as opposed to the stuff that's a semi solid and light colored). they claim it is raw. i think they filter it and heat it just enough to be able to bottle it, around 105 degrees. but yes... not all raw honey is equal. obviously the unfiltered stuff is better.

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