0

votes

Raw Milk on low histamine paleo diet?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 25, 2013 at 9:04 PM

I'm trying to implement a low histamine paleo diet.

I've been reading about raw milk and since it is legal here in Pennsylvania, I was interested in giving it a try.

I read something in a German publication of a case study where a person did not do well with ultra high temperature processed milk or cream.

I would have assumed that pasteurization (the higher the better) would have resulted in lower histamines because the bacteria which could convert protein into histamine have been killed.

Any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Mike

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 07, 2013
at 02:54 AM

A lovely (and complete unintelligible) copy-paste job with no reference.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on February 26, 2013
at 12:02 AM

Thanks August. I'm new to the histamine thing and am in the final phases or repeat challenges to make sure I don't make a wrong conclusion, and that histamines is actually what's going on with me. As you know, it's tricky because you rarely eat an isolated food item or chemical constituent. If you are reacting to cheese, is it the milk protein, the histamine, sodium, etc.? It's taken me forever to construct challenges that isolate one item at a time.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

best answer

1
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on February 25, 2013
at 10:29 PM

I think it could work, assuming the milk does not sit anywhere for very long. Histamines form as things sit around, so if you can get it really fresh, you will probably be okay. If it hangs around, even in the fridge, for several days, then however many histamines can form have a chance to. So, you could get it really fresh and drink it right away and/or freeze it in appropriate serving sizes and just defrost it as you need it.

I'm still new to this myself; I didn't seem sensitive to histamine until I started working out.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on February 26, 2013
at 12:02 AM

Thanks August. I'm new to the histamine thing and am in the final phases or repeat challenges to make sure I don't make a wrong conclusion, and that histamines is actually what's going on with me. As you know, it's tricky because you rarely eat an isolated food item or chemical constituent. If you are reacting to cheese, is it the milk protein, the histamine, sodium, etc.? It's taken me forever to construct challenges that isolate one item at a time.

0
3cbf147cc0345e57831c8541350c819c

on April 07, 2013
at 02:12 AM

ultra pasteurization of milk is a process of heating the milk for about 3 seconds to temperatures of about 270 degrees F. This process kills all the good and bad bacteria present in raw milk. The resulting ultra pasteurized milk is simply dead protein remains of the good and bad bacteria. The final milk product includes all the dead proteins referred to as a cytotoxins or histamines when ingested in the human body. The human body's reaction to the dead protein is as to an allergen - the body cannot identify the dead proteins, so the body attacks the dead proteins. The milk is essentially a poison to the human body at the point of being ultra pasteurized. Raw milk, whether from human breast milk, or from animal sources, contains living bacteria, and would not produce the allergic reaction that the ultra pasteurized milk produces. The human baby finds the mother's breast milk useful because of the good bacteria/protein that is passed during nursing - and is necessary for populating the baby's stomach with bacteria. Any milk that is not raw, has lost the essential nutrients for which milk consumption was originally intended. Although, nowadays, the milk industry adds Algal Oil as a substitute for Linoleic Acid (a fatty acid comprising Omega-3 oils that is often expensively sought in fish oil; related to Conjugated Linoleic Acid, CLA, from animal sources) that is neutralized during the pasteurization process. Questionable still, is whether the total worth of algal oil present in a 1/2 gallon of ultra pasteurized milk could not be sourced cheaper in a powder form, as harvest algae often assumes.

source: medical literature online

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 07, 2013
at 02:54 AM

A lovely (and complete unintelligible) copy-paste job with no reference.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!