2

votes

Raw milk/meat study question

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 03, 2012 at 4:42 AM

I was looking for something else, and found this on Wiki:

Meat study

In one study, one group of cats was fed a diet of two-thirds raw meat, one-third raw milk, and cod-liver oil while the second group was fed a diet of two-thirds cooked meat, one-third raw milk, and cod-liver oil. The cats fed the all-raw diet were healthy while the cats fed the cooked meat diet developed various health problems.

By the end of the first generation the cats started to develop degenerative diseases and became quite lazy. By the end of the second generation, the cats had developed degenerative diseases by mid-life and started losing their coordination. By the end of the third generation the cats had developed degenerative diseases very early in life and some were born blind and weak and had a much shorter life span. Many of the third generation cats couldn't even produce offspring. There was an abundance of parasites and vermin while skin diseases and allergies increased from an incidence of five percent in normal cats to over 90 percent in the third generation of deficient cats. Kittens of the third generation did not survive six months. Bones became soft and pliable and the cats suffered from adverse personality changes. Males became docile while females became more aggressive.

The cats suffered from most of the degenerative diseases encountered in human medicine and died out totally by the fourth generation.

At the time of Pottenger's Study the amino acid taurine had been discovered but had not yet been identified as an essential amino acid for Cats. Today many cats thrive on a cooked meat diet where taurine has been added after cooking. The deficient diets lacked sufficient taurine to allow the cats to properly form protein structures and resulted in the health effects observed. Pottenger himself concluded that there was likely an "as yet unknown" protein factor that may have been heat sensitive.

Milk Study

In another study, dubbed the "Milk Study," the cats were fed 2/3 milk and 1/3 meat. All groups were fed raw meat with different groups getting raw, pasteurized, evaporated, sweetened condensed or raw metabolized vitamin D milk. The cats on raw milk were the healthiest while the rest exhibited varying degrees of health problems similar to the previous cooked meat study.

This particular Pottenger cat study has been cited by advocates of raw milk as evidence that it is likely healthier for humans than pasteurized milk.

Questions:

  1. How similar are people to cats?

  2. Are there similar studies done in humans?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 04, 2013
at 06:36 PM

The idea of eating raw meat always grossed me out till I ... tried it. Delicious! Look up a video on Youtube - a little girl eating raw meat.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 03, 2012
at 05:31 AM

Lactose intolerant cats? Wow. And I thought I had it bad. Thanks!!!

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on December 03, 2012
at 05:24 AM

Good question. Also: WHY the benefits of raw? I've mostly read about raw food in the vegan-propaganda sense of the word, wherein the benefits are attributed to non-specific "enzymes that are destroyed by heat". What's the actual science behind it? Does it have any applicability for humans? Does the potential of parasites eclipse any potential benefit we could get from eating raw meat?

  • F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

    asked by

    (15515)
  • Views
    2.1K
  • Last Activity
    1522D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

2
4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on December 03, 2012
at 05:28 AM

The Value of Pottenger's study is not about the milk and meat itself, but rather looking at the cumulative effects of diet and malnutrition through the generations.

Cats can be just as lactose intolerant as humans can, and some "lactose intolerance" is more pasteurization intolerance (aka, raw milk is fine but pasteurized milk is not), so the milk study is not a surprise.

I would not take either study as a "Humans should do X," but I dont take that view with modern rat studies either.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 03, 2012
at 05:31 AM

Lactose intolerant cats? Wow. And I thought I had it bad. Thanks!!!

1
1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

on May 04, 2013
at 04:26 PM

This is an old question, but, according to Primal Body, Primal Mind, (Nora Geudagas (?) -unsure about spelling of last name): Cats will suffer from consuming cooked milk, as raw milk contains an enzyme or chemical which cats need, and do not produce themselves.

Humans do produce this chemical/enzyme.

That said, based on what (little) I know certainly, raw milk does appear to have many enzymes and compounds which aid in the breakdown and absorption of things like vitamins A and D, which appear to be crucial to a number of brain, organ, etc. functions, and tend to be deficient in modern-day (not just standard bad-food) diets.

If I remember accurately, it might also contain vitamin K2, which -- must go, will finish answer in a bit. K2 is important for synthesis of A & D in bodies and rich in traditional peoples' diets.

Raw meat - unsure at the moment how that works. Haven't researched properly. Is fascinating. Will look more into.

Sabertooth

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 04, 2013
at 06:36 PM

The idea of eating raw meat always grossed me out till I ... tried it. Delicious! Look up a video on Youtube - a little girl eating raw meat.

1
F8fb7f16a02306405a796cc670a0f3f9

on December 03, 2012
at 03:47 PM

Cats also demand quite a bit more taurine than us- it's why they add it to cat food and is found most abundantly in raw meat- and did not evolve to eat cooked food, which it seems we did. I've never seen a cat pan sear a steak.

http://therenegadevarietyhour.tumblr.com/

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!