2

votes

If I microwave raw milk, will I lose the benefits?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 02, 2011 at 7:37 PM

Sometimes I like to drink my raw goat milk warmed up. Will this defeat the purpose of drinking raw milk at all? Will it destroy all of the beneficial properties of the milk?

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on November 03, 2011
at 02:54 PM

Perhaps use a kitchen thermometer to test how hot it's getting after heating?

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on November 03, 2011
at 02:54 PM

Perhaps use a thermometer to test how hot it's getting?

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on November 02, 2011
at 09:28 PM

I've found that if I heat my milk in a stainless steel pot on the stove (from cold), that as soon as the condensation on the outside has evaporated, it's the perfect temperature for hot chocolate. According to The Healthy Home Economist, anything over 118 degrees will burn you, so, using that as my gauge, it's perfectly fine.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 02, 2011
at 08:24 PM

Thanks for the clarification! I knew I had read 140F somewhere, but I wasn't sure it was in the right context.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

6
Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on November 02, 2011
at 08:22 PM

118 degrees deactivates enzymes with moist heat, and 140 degrees dry. Vitamin denaturing depends on the vitamin.

118 degrees will, to most, feel too hot to comfortably drink, so if you're just warming it slightly the nutrients will remain intact.

As Kewpie said, the mic creates hot spots and thus it's hard to control, but if you keep an eye on it and keep stirring it, that should help minimize any hot spot nutrient degradation.

Other than that, the microwave oven has no unique ability to destroy nutrients just by dint of using microwaves. Microwaves cause water molecules in the food to vibrate, which creates heat, which cooks the food.

Mmm, goat's milk...now I want some. :)

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 02, 2011
at 08:24 PM

Thanks for the clarification! I knew I had read 140F somewhere, but I wasn't sure it was in the right context.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on November 02, 2011
at 09:28 PM

I've found that if I heat my milk in a stainless steel pot on the stove (from cold), that as soon as the condensation on the outside has evaporated, it's the perfect temperature for hot chocolate. According to The Healthy Home Economist, anything over 118 degrees will burn you, so, using that as my gauge, it's perfectly fine.

5
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 02, 2011
at 08:11 PM

It depends how high you heat it. If you stay under a certain temp (140F, maybe?), it shouldn't destroy any of the milk's properties. However, a microwave isn't easy to control in that regard since it creates spots of very high heat. If you want to drink warm milk, slowly warming it on a stove would definitely be preferable.

If you want it warm away from home, you could set it out at room temp for a couple of hours before drinking. It wouldn't necessarily be warm, but it would take the chill off.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!